austin music

Free Hamze: “nothing4granted” (prod. Sekko)

Valentine’s Day’s not just for the couples. No, there’s an extensive list of local events offering RSVPs to love fools, lonely hearts and relationship-skippers alike. Among that full house of options? Austin’s very own Free Hamze.

Originally enticed into the genre by the Arabic incorporations of Mos Def and Lupe Fiasco (and the early/mid-2000s sound they helped proliferate), this Lebanese-born rapper’s really been blazing up an electic reputation since releasing his debut record Green Alchemy back in Summer 2022. Aside from his sword-surpassing penmanship and complex flow cadences, Free Hamze’s also somewhat of a bleeding heart, having founded the pro bono endeavor Sahar Studios and begun developing a 40-acre sustainable desert community. And while music is unmistakably Free Hamze’s brightest guiding light, principles of relentless liberation, of (true to his handle) freedom in any form, definitely inform Free’s impressive drive, which continued last winter with FREETAPE 3: Survival of the Realest.

So if you’re already falling in love with the idea of feeling Free Hamze’s heat tomorrow night, make it a date and drop by Electric Lounge 7PM then – followed by Kizzy Zeniba at 8 and Space Goonz at 9. But if you’d rather stay home and feel too cool for this Hallmark holiday, sub out a bottle of prosecco with a fresh production from Sekko that came out last Friday, nothing4granted. Hazy guitar chords, sensually subtle drums, and laid back lyrical triplets steal the show on this new sentimental standalone, one that easily elevates Free Hamze over the cookie cutter “mumble rap” slurs of his contemporaries.

Tommy Taylor: “Ghost Town”

Here in Austin, we like to make a big fuss over our Central Texas music icons, erecting statues and renaming streets in their honor. So while the respective likeness and namesake of Stevie Ray Vaughan and Willie Nelson have become local landmarks, in reality, our city limits have several legends just hiding in plain sight.

Like Tommy Taylor, whose deft drumming on Christopher Cross’ ’79 debut undeniably helped make it the timeless classic it is today. But that’s just scratching the surface; on top of a longtime spot in Eric Johnson’s band, Taylor’s played with the likes of SRV, Charlie Sexton, Jerry Jeff Walker, Shawn Colvin, Ray Benson and many more over what must be an incredibly fulfilling career. Turns out though that Tommy Taylor wasn’t too keen on just letting those records speak for themselves, since after several years of encouragement, he recently put his voice front and center of his own tunes.

Created in collaboration with fellow legend and multi-Grammy winner Michael Omartian, Across the Stars came out last September. Between Omartian’s top notch production techniques and Taylor’s well-seasoned sense of songwriting (fleshed out characters and all), Across the Stars is an astronomical entry for this pair of yacht rock royals. So don’t expect any tumbleweeds or crickets when the silence comes at the end of this nine-song journey, because even early pieces like the album opener “Ghost Town” just sound plain great. Since we’re guessing there’s a galaxy’s worth of other material under Taylor’s belt, here’s hoping Across the Stars won’t be a standalone in Tommy’s discography.

The 2024 Grammys / Professional DMs

Confucius and Fresh recap their likes and dislikes of The Grammys and break down how to best approach them for music consideration. You’ll hear some great Hip-Hop Facts, fun takes when Confucius Reads the News, and an Unpopular Opinion about the impact of media inspired by the 2005 film Havoc.

Alesia Lani: “homebody” (feat. FLOST8)

Listening to Alesia Lani is like the first kiss from a longtime crush. Her music makes hearts skip beats and occupies thoughts long after it’s left. But even though Alesia Lani’s flirtations with R&B-Soul are strong enough to make a full standing room swoon, she’s got a bit of an introverted nature underneath the tunes. And despite a SoFar Sounds Valentine’s Day show 8PM next Wednesday for all the wannabe lovers, Lani just dropped an anthem of sorts for us wallflowers.

It comes ahead of her next album love like lofi, out March 8th. Based on the name, we’re expecting a little less production fidelity than what we heard on last October’s Self Titled, but based on the quality of content from that last LP, the caliber of songwriting and performance has still gotta be high. So with showers in the forecast, this morning Alesia Lani drew back the curtain on love like lofi with the record’s lead single, “homebody“, one that finds her teaming up with eclectic beatmaker FLOST8.

The pitter patter of precipitation trickles past the pane to prime “homebody” and its ode to the rainy day mentality. Order a pizza, sprawl out on the couch, roll up something nice, flick on the mood lighting, and snuggle with the cat. Because it’s not lazy. It’s just lowkey.

Ash and the Endings: “Victor’s Trap”

In the eons since Prometheus’ divine theft, we’ve figured out that starting a fire from anything is better than completely starting from scratch, even if it’s a step up from a random damp spot to a ring of rock. It’s true; even if your last burn didn’t leave any charcoal, the ashes of the past can still kindle in new contexts. And that’s not just Camping 101. It also rings true for a local outfit.

And that’s Ash and the Endings, founded and fronted by namesake lead singer Ashton Chase alongside four embers…er…members. Ranging from quadruple digit sessions and concerts, to acting and penning theatre, to running a floral design company, each member’s background lends itself to Ash and the Endings’ eclectic style and ability to give old experiences new beginnings. Starting off with their eponymous Summer 2022 LP, this quintet’s continued to dust off nooks of psych rock, three-part harmonies and all, across their expansive alt-rock attic.

If you want to catch Ash et al live, they’ll be celebrating Valentine’s Day 8PM next Wednesday at Far Out Lounge with openers Betty Benedeadly at 7 and closers NSFWho at 9. And although their latest studio offering doesn’t officially drop until tomorrow, the band was gracious enough to pry back the spring and let us crawl into “Victor’s Trap”. A perfect preface to Valentine’s Day, this reflection on intrinsic attractiveness, dating apps, and sex appeal in commercial music will easily infiltrate any ’90s grunge playlist. It might not be as romantic as a Victor Hugo novel, but it kicks off with a stirring bass line, that gears you up for gritty guitar, impressive vocal intervals, obliterating drums, and one heck of a long tail after a rolling cadence of a bridge. Not a fan of Ash and the Endings yet? “Victor’s Trap” might just snatch you up.

Confession & Song: Wood Belly – “Late Bloomer”

Colorado “new grass” aficionados, Wood Belly, turn our confessor’s low key embarrassing first romantic encounter into high key folk pop delight in OUR FIRST EPISODE OF OUR THIRD FULL SEASON. HuZzAH!!! In this here part 1, you’ll hear the song and confession, and Zac talk about meeting his wife. In part 2, you’ll hear Wood Belly member Brennan tell you about the band’s history and what exactly it sounds like when doves cry.

Check out more Wood Belly here: https://www.woodbellymusic.com/

Got a story you want to confess and maybe have it turned into a song? Join the Song Confessional mailing list to stay up to date on all of our latest episode, news, and the whereabouts of our confessional booth: https://songconfessional.com/connect.

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Matt the Electrician: “Human Echo”

It’s been a long time since Matt the Electrician made his last official house call. But although the days of his eponymous trade are behind us, Matt’s still got the spark to put a tap in our foot and a smile on our face each time he plays. In our ever-crowding, sometimes cocky live scene, Matt the Electrician really does humble the competition thanks to decades of astute observations and unpretentious performances, unplugged or otherwise. And with a discography as deep as his, comparing the output from his folk rock contemporaries to Matt the Electrician is almost like a drop in the ocean.

Speaking of which, Matt the Electrician just finished up his latest installation last Friday with his full-length The Ocean Knocked Me Down, a sixteen-track tidal wave of lighthearted fun and buoyant optimism that features some Austin favorites. Over the next couple weeks, this electrician will be workin’ on a regional circuit, with stops in Arkansas, Missouri, and Kansas before returning to Texas in March. Glancing at Matt the Electrician’s calendar, there’s a suspicious gap right where SXSW lands, but we do know for sure that he’ll have another Austin show on April 20th at The Rollins Theater.

Until then, if you’ve depleted your remaining surplus of holiday cheer, let The Ocean Knocked Me Down wash away that wintertime blues with charming originals like “Human Echo”. The second track in The Ocean…‘s new batch, “Human Echo” reverberates with skanky ukulele, unruffled trumpet riffs, big bear hugs of group vocals, tasteful key chords, and the jocund wisdom that whatever it will be…is whatever it will be.

Baby the Band: “Not Forever”

You never want to spread your style thin by dabbling with too many different sounds, especially when you’re starting out. We’re not saying you should oversimplify things when those bits of inspiration hit. If you can successfully finesse ’em in there without derailing your stylistic strengths, then more power to you. But a little consistency early on can do wonders for an artist’s reliability down the road.

That said, we really love what we’ve been hearing from Austin’s Baby the Band. Not to be confused with fellow Texas musicians Babythe band. Considering core member Norrie Swofford, a veteran of Nolan Potter’s Nightmare Band who’s currently behind synth and keys for Dayglow, it makes sense that Baby the Band sort of sits in the middle; they scour off some of Dayglow’s pristine pop polish and reel in a bit of that absolute Nolan Potter madness. Baby the Band’s mellow wheelhouse of ethereal psych-pop-rock crafts with consistent timbres and mixing techniques, which made them a dream come true when they first appeared on streaming right after lockdown.

Far from a blemish on their legacy, Baby the Band gave us the new two-parter “Stain” / “Not Forever” just a couple weeks back. The former’s just as good as the latter, and the seamless flow between the two proves the pieces’ companionship. But we gotta give special credit to “Not Forever” for its execution of brevity without cutting the jam too short, wailing hard on a near-two-minute-long sax solo and never letting the energy drag. Either way, both’ll sound nifty if you’re trippin’! And both are aural euphoria at the press of “play”.

Caelin: “Will I Ever Love Again”

Love at first sight has ignited countless fairy tales, both modern and classic. But as common as those instantaneous head-over-heels plunges are in day-to-day life, statistically speaking, “happy endings” are a lot less likely. And breakups sure do suck…but that’s why breakup songs go so hard, regardless of your relationship status.

This is where we call in Caelin, an Austin singer-songwriter who categorizes their sound as “dreamy emo country”, which, while accurate, excludes the elements of folk, R&B, indie Americana, and pop we heard on her debut record save me from me that dropped last May. This year, Caelin’s coming hot off some caught feelings…well…more like getting over an intense infatuation. And she’s set to expand on that timeless “loved and lost” outlook over the course of her sophomore EP Strangers In Love, out sometime around late Spring or early Summer.

For Strangers In Love, Caelin enlisted the production talent of KUTX favorite Walker Lukens as well as the Big Apple’s Ben Coleman to help this poignant post-mortem panoply of past memories and soul searching really pop. This morning Caelin released Strangers In Love‘s introduction, “Will I Ever Love Again”, ahead of a show 9PM tonight at Mohawk alongside Madison Baker, Barb, and a DJ set from Vonne. Just in time for the flurry of Valentine’s Day drivel that always floods the first half of February, this Lukens-produced lead single captures the enduring, existential pain of occupied thoughts over the one who got away for a wholly pensive effect…all without sounding pouty or puerile. Between an ethereal arrangement, lyrics that scour emotional scars, and one hell of a vocal performance, “Will I Ever Love Again” might bury you alive in heartbreak. So remember. The magic may be momentary. But the music and its empathic abilities last forever.

The Lonesome Heroes: “Placebo Sun”

It’s nifty how different sorts of sporty recreation mingle with specific subgenres of music; think surf, skate punk, or yacht rock. But since you can also just longboard down the access road, sippin’ Ocean Spray to some classic Fleetwood Mac without a care in the world, the rules clearly aren’t hard and fast. What’s most important is the meditation in motion, a flow state inspired by the movement of the music itself.

So even though roller skating may be most closely associated to disco (at least historically speaking), there’s an Austin outfit putting those trucks on a whole new set of wheels. That’s The Lonesome Heroes, who’ve endured the rinks of the local live scene (and far beyond) for nearly twenty years now, weaving between the best parts of indie, country, and Americana. Most recently, this veteran quintet scored another milestone with their sixth LP Seasons Change, which has already racked up some impressive streaming numbers in the short time since its November release.

And in line with frontman Rich Russell’s decision to open up the record’s writing process to a few Austin friends, these hometown heroes are lookin’ a little less lonesome in the album opener “Placebo Sun”‘s new music video…as a matter of fact they rounded up a whole roller posse to kick off their boots and strap on some skates! To fully soak up the authentic cosmic Americana radiance of “Placebo Sun”, you’ll have to keep The Lonesome Heroes company 10PM tonight at Hotel Vegas ahead of Alien Eyelid at 10:45, Shinglers at 11:30, and Automatic Weekend half past midnight, no paddling, skiing or interstellar travel required…maybe just a show-stealing, shot-bombing pooch.

Leila Sunier: “All I Choose”

Just like the three wise monkeys, it can be enticing to turn a blind eye rather than than process a harsh reality. So even though switching on tunnel vision is probably your best bet when passing a bad roadside accident, it’s a lot tougher to avert your gaze from a “dumpster fire” at large. Because what you choose to observe directly affects both your wisdom and skepticism.

At least that’s the vibe we get from singer-songwriter-guitarist-producer Leila Sunier, who moved down here from her native New York not too long after dropping her 2020 sophomore Where Everything Is Perfect. A big fan of filled-out arrangements and compressor-contradicting dynamics, Sunier’s indie-pop-folk-alt-rock concoction has caught plenty of attention, including that of At the Drive-In producer Alex Newport and Austin’s own Ghostland Observatory, for whom she opened up last June.

Now that those flavors have ripened within Austin’s “blueberry in the tomato soup”, Leila Sunier’s set to hit high marks for self-reflection and social commentary on Too Big For Right Now, out this July. Ahead of a gig 10:30PM this Friday at Captain Quackenbush’s (with openers Taylor Kron at 8:30 and Howdy Cherry at 9:30), last weekend Leila shared the latest in a panoply of delicate-yet-purposeful folk forays off Too Big For Right Now, “All I Choose”. So if you typically try to cram multiple shows into the start of your weekend, maybe just stick with the obvious choice this time around. For right now, though, feast on the meditative roadside visuals of “All I Choose”, whose minimalist eggshell sonics swell into something much bigger than expected without becoming bombastic. It’s beautiful. It’s brilliant. And it’s a sure sign that Sunier will keep on soaring upward.

Muchacho Sanchez: “First Mind”

Thanks to a nationwide renaissance, Chicano Soul’s been getting a lot of recent praise for its bridging of Mexican and American, of Spanish and English, in a way that blurs national and ethnic boundaries. And if we’re talking about musical movements in the same ilk, right down to its name, Tejano has to be be towards the top of that list.Of course, to authentically contribute to that sound, an artist has to have substantial experience on both sides of the border. Which brings us to Muchacho Sanchez. Sanchez split his early days between the L.A. metro and the majestic ranchos of Durango before spending a chunk of his twenties traveling across the country, soaking up every inspiring sight and unique sound in the process. Well, even though Sanchez settled down in Austin back in 2012, that nomadic drive is still alive and well in Muchacho’s music, as heard and seen in the backdrop of a trío of YouTube demos.This morning we received the debut studio single from Muchacho Sanchez, one that proves this young troubadour’s already shaping up to be a rad hombre. Recorded and produced by Charley Crockett/Sentimental Family Band collaborator Billy Horton, “First Mind” is a passionate primer paso empowered by Sanchez’ pure soul and road-wise experience. So if you’re craving some quality Tex-Mex but only have time for a quick two-step, turns Muchacho’s volume up to the max and let loose, because “First Mind” absolutely hits the spot in three minutes flat.

Shakey Graves & Jess Williamson: “True Love Will Find You In The End” (Live at Longhorn Cavern)

When it comes to natural landmarks, Texas is absolutely teeming with them. From meteor craters and sinkholes to canyons, rivers, forests, mountain ranges, lakes, and caverns, our vast landscape offers a ton of variety to make up for those long car rides. And none of that Earth-born beauty could be conserved as well as it has been without the Texas Parks & Wildlife Foundation, who just celebrated the centennial of Texas State Parks last year.

If you missed it, TPWF recently teamed up with KUTX favorite Walker Lukens to produce Texas Wild, a collection of iconic Texas tunes performed by some of the Lone Star’s finest to commemorate that hundred-year legacy of astonishing state parks. That eleven-track vinyl packs a wallop on its own, no doubt, but because everything’s bigger when you’re here, the Texas Wild team just had to make some extra hay for this salute.

So, alongside the KUTX Multimedia Crew, Walker, The Bright Light Social Hour, Shakey Graves, and Jess Williamson took a field trip out to Longhorn Cavern State Park in Burnet to bask in the ancestral acoustics and primal reverb that only an eon-old limestone cave can provide. Their chamber-filling rendition of Daniel Johnston’s “True Love Will Find You In The End” can haunt any home stereo, but to fully immerse yourself in this one-of-a-kind space, you gotta check out the video. Because like witnessing all-star set of stalagmites suddenly come to life, with outward reverence for their surroundings and instruments at the ready, it’s a visual treat that plants you into a truly magical habitat, one you won’t want to leave when the music’s over.

Urban Heat: “Sanitizer”

After naming them as our July 2022 Artist of the Month, we here at KUTX have gotten an awful lot of opportunities to gush about the Austin synth-goth gargantua that is Urban Heat. With a blacked-out sense of fashion and all the industrial analogue toys a bitter boy could want, Urban Heat instantly evokes an impossibly-slick sense of 1980s nihilism, perfectly primed for our pandemic era and an entire dejected generation. Of course, there’s still a ton of synth-pop beauty in the bass-and-beat-driven bleakness, as heard throughout Urban Heat’s 2022 album Wellness and the handful of singles they’ve shared since.

So, sure, the Wellness stalwart “Have You Ever” has climbed past millions of streams, but that success hasn’t slowed Urban Heat’s ascension to The Tower, out this summer. If we’d just heard this next record’s first lead single, “Like This”, we’d honestly expect much of the same from Wellness. Turns out though, that Wellness was just the foundation for The Tower, as made clear by the full-length’s second preview, “Sanitizer”.

Far from a sterile sound, “Sanitizer” oozes infectious electro elements like drastically-saturated bass tones, scalpel-sharp drums, and pitch wheel synth sirens that’ll elevate your heartbeat with what’s easily Urban Heat’s most aggressive original to date. Clearly, there’s no musical malpractice when it comes to these goth doctors…but the same can’t be said for the trio’s trauma team characters in the music video for “Sanitizer”. It’s gross. It’s hilarious. It’ll tear your heart right out. And you’d better believe Urban Heat turns the O.R. into a dance floor for their lucky pair of patients (dancers Larissa Dali and Quentin Arispe). So between Urban Heat kickoff of a tour in support of Twin Tribes tonight in Pomona and their return to Texas in early February, remember: a play of “Sanitizer” a day keeps bad music away.

Alma Jette: “Demons”

When an artist spends precious set time talking about a song’s inspiration, they’re sometimes met with the demand of “less talk, more rock”. Which is pretty unfair, because when your tunes are left up to interpretation, setting the stage for your lyrics is just as important as contextualizing an ajar journal entry.

So we gotta applaud the admirable candor of Mary Bryce, who, on top of keeping her Substack regularly updated, is also quite the accomplished poet, painter, and singer-songwriter, best known in the latter category among locals as a member of long-gone Austin outfit SMiiLE. Like the best of us, Mary seized the start of the pandemic to begin working on a new creative outlet – Alma Jette (alongside a solo album recorded straight to tape) before re-locating to Los Angeles with her then-partner/SMiiLE frontman Jake Miles. But that brief period between the LP’s affectionate origins and the present hasn’t been without tumult; just last year, Bryce’s long-term relationship with Miles ended shortly after the pair’s L.A. home burned down.

Fortunately, those circumstances haven’t left too sour a taste in Bryce’s mouth. At least not enough to scrap the whole project. Instead, like a phoenix, those ten intimate snapshots have taken on more, wiser nuance with Alma Jette’s debut full-length, I Found A Reason, out late April. And since Bryce now splits her time between LA and ATX, it’s definitely worth catching Alma Jette in town for a single release this Friday ’round midnight at Sagebrush after openers Sammy G at 9PM, Other Vessels at 10PM, and Harry & Emmy at 11PM. That single – “Demons” – cuts straight to the chase of its title in its first handful of seconds before an enchanting orchestral arrangement pushes emotions to the top. It’s almost like a just-discovered Joni Mitchell folk rock single at a thematic midpoint between Kacey Musgraves’ Golden Hour and Star-Crossed. Just don’t blame Bryce when the waterworks start flowing…

The new season of Song Confessional starts Feb 7th!

The new season of the Song Confessional podcast arrives on Feb 7th! Walker Lukens and Zac Catanzaro travel around the world collecting anonymous confessions from everyday people and then give them to songwriters and bands who turn them into new original songs. This season features new songs from artists like Golden Dawn Arkestra, Woodbelly, Buffalo Hunt, Pigeon John, and more !

Breadcouch: “WAIT” (feat. Ben Buck)

We’re struggling to find the exact quote, so maybe we just imagined it, but we’re pretty sure Notorious B.I.G. said something along the lines of, “Ready to Die was 10% skill and 90% the chronic”, alluding to his lauded lyricism. And while we don’t advocate for substance use as a sole source of inspiration, we do appreciate how much a quick smoke session can convince a lyricist to get comfortable and let the beat play as long as it needs. Because when an un-rushed set of free-association bars have spent enough time in the oven, they often come out hotter and fresher than your run-of-the-mill one-take freestyle.

That brings us to Austin’s Breadcouch, who’s been baking his eccentric brand of alternative hip-hop/R&B since 2020. The multi-genre fusion of Breadcouch’s boundary-less beats really lends itself to the versatility of his vocals, which switch between rapping and singing for evenly-toasted slices of bedroom soul-pop, electronica, trap, boom bap, and even indie rock, all from the same, surprisingly-cohesive loaf. And although you could sample a few brief crumbs from Breadcouch’s expansive catalogue and label his style as “wordy” or “busy”, we respect the grains of brevity that Breadcouch brings to his hooks.

Case in point: a new tune featuring fellow Austin rapper-producer Ben Buck, “WAIT”. They’ll both be performing at Hole in the Wall tonight for the Speaker Bump Social, so smoke ’em if you got ’em, and let the hazy wordplay, sativa-scented samples, blunt-ready bass, and doja-derived drums of “WAIT” whisk you through this showery Wednesday.

King Warbler: “Lifestyle”

If you’ve been keeping tally of unique local releases just over the past month, you already know 2024’s shaping up to be a big year. And King Warbler is definitely among that elite subset of Austin specimens who always perk our ears up within the first couple notes of their distinct calls.

With chief songwriter/vocalist/piano-keyboardist Jack Van Norman ever steering the formation forward, the five-player flock recently took another interesting turn in the long migration from 2016’s Rosanky. A half decade removed from the distortion-heavy 2018 EP Wake Up Blonde, King Warbler’s maintains that elevated production level on their upcoming sophomore full-length, Texas Sky, albeit with an extra element of ’70s sass showing up to the party.

Texas Sky touches down this Friday, followed by an LP release show 9:30PM this Saturday at Captain Quackenbush’s Soundscape alongside Abram Shook at 8:30 and Batty Jr. at 10:30. And based on the pair of lead singles that got shared a couple weeks back, Texas Sky is looking like a horizon-filling collection of sounds. Such as the blue-eyed “Lifestyle”, which circles the docks of early yacht rock on feathers of Allen Toussaint and Elton John with a little crest of Leon Russell on top. With a drum shuffle we think Bernard Purdie’d approve of, jazz-adjacent piano chords that give off Steely feels, beautifully-busy, scale-spanning bass licks, some tasteful electric guitar soaring past every once in a while, and impressive vocal intervals to boot, “Lifestyle” is a graceful, mature, and warmly-welcomed addition to Love Austin Music Month.

2024: Year of the Austin Breakthrough?

Confucius and Fresh kick this week off by weighing the odds of an Austin hip-hop/R&B artist breaking out into the national mainstream before tackling the latest from everyone’s favorite controversy-maker – Lil Nas X. Get all that, Hip-Hop Facts, an Unpopular Opinion about hip-hop’s hatred of Drake, and Confucius Reads the News in this edition.

West 22nd: “Sleeping Alone”

In the midst of this drizzly, nippy, and overall kind of crummy weather, we can’t really fault anyone maximizing their time under the covers. And on behalf of the bounty of additional body heat, everyone with a significant other, a temporary cuffing acquaintance, or just a fuzzy friend willing to curl up really ought to feel thankful. Because the alternative is feeling extra frigid right about now. Fortunately for those battling Old Man Winter solo, there’s a new homegrown anthem that’ll warm any bitter spirits right on up.

It comes from Austin indie rock quintet West 22nd, the five friends who only crept up onto streaming services last August with their debut EP All the Way Home. Despite their recent shared confrontations with adulthood and the less-than-picture-perfect realities of relationships that come with it, West 22nd still maintains an undeniably youthful energy in their originals – not necessarily what we’d call wise, but certainly not puerile either.

And they’ve hit the ground running in the new year, having played not too far from their namesake last weekend at The Ballroom and performing again this Friday at Mohawk Outdoors alongside Sounds by Moonbby and Polo Perks opening for Skaiwater. So while West 22nd’s English counterparts may scoff at us Texans shivering from a brief week of freezing, we’d like to think that fellow chilly mammals Arctic Monkeys may not have anything bad to say about “Sleeping Alone”, released last Friday. Emblematic of that iconic early-millennium indie rock renaissance, “Sleeping Alone” sticks it to The Strokes with a nuanced arrangement and considerably less reliance on studio magic. So if you find yourself tossing and turning, maybe missing that special someone, crank “Sleeping Alone” all the way up, delete that has-been from your contacts, and maybe even plan on meeting someone new this Friday at the Mohawk.