Water

Texas Standard: May 23, 2022

Plans to lift Title 42 at the border today are now on hold. We’ll look at what this means for the future of immigration and deportations. Other stories we’re tracking: how the mass shooting in Buffalo, New York is resonating in El Paso, the site of a racist shooting at a Wal Mart three years ago. Also what a political runoff in South Texas tells us about an intra-party ideological battle among Texas Democrats. And more than a year ago, the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality announced a social justice initiative. So what’s happened since, and what hasn’t? And a new film that puts a more human face on a larger than life Texas baseball legend. All that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 5, 2022

With the Supreme Court now widely expected to overturn Roe vs. Wade, new numbers of where Texans stand on the issue of Abortion. From abortion to border security, the state’s population growth and the economy, Texans weigh in on a range of issues that could have a profound effect at the polls come November. Jim Henson with the results of a new survey by the Texas Politics Project. Also, Texas’ attempt to treat gender-affirming care as “Child Abuse”. A new report examines the underlying scientific claims being made by officials leading the push. Plus, say cheese, Texas: why a place better known for its beef is challenging dominant states in the dairy business. All this and then some today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 15, 2022

The business of border security. Who’s making millions, and who’s paying the price tag? An investigation by the Houston Chronicle takes a closer look. Also, new commercial checkpoints at the border set up by Governor Abbott now opening back up for business? We’ll have the latest. Plus presidential debates and their impartiality. How debatable? The GOP says Republicans running for president will have to sign a pledge not to participate with the Commission on Presidential Debates. Ricard Pineda of the University of Texas at El Paso talks about the implications. And Kristen Cabrera cracks open the story of an Easter tradition especially widespread in south Texas and northern Mexico. All that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 11, 2022

A woman charged with murder in Texas after an alleged self induced abortion has been released, but that’s far from the end of the story. Many fear the arrest and murder charge in Starr County could be a harbinger of what’s to come amid a rise in abortion restrictions and an expected ruling from the United States Supreme Court. We’ll hear more. Also the hype over hemp: what new data says about the legalization of the hemp industry in Texas and whether it has turned out to be as big an economic boon as advocates had hoped. And the race to save the stories behind a musical movement: reclaiming and preserving San Antonio’s Westside sound. All of that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: February 18, 2022

Nineteen indictments of Austin police officers in what appears to be one of the biggest indictments of a single police department in connection with the racial justice demonstrations of 2020. Also, the week in politics with the Texas Tribune. These stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: December 1, 2021

Four new laws aimed at improving the lives of almost a million and a half Texas residents who served in the military. We’ll have Details. Other stories we’re following: young authors and librarians weigh in on the Governor’s attempts to purge what he calls pornography from public schools. Also big news for a small city: what the decision to locate a new multi-billion dollar semiconductor facility means for the town of Taylor in Central Texas. Also what’s in the name “Brackenridge” and a Politifact check of a claim that U.S. households are on track to spend 19 billion dollars more on energy by 2030. All that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 18, 2021

Among Texas democrats, few potential challengers to the incumbent have his name recognition. But will it be enough? We’ll have all the details on O’Rourke Vs Abbott. Also, as retailers and consumers gear up for high shopping season, a supply chain bottleneck at Texas’ biggest ports of entry. The view from Houston. And millions earmarked for Texas’ aging water infrastructure…just a drop in the bucket? Also, Commentator Peniel Joseph on expected exonerations in the murder of Malcolm X, opening new questions about race and the criminal justice system. Plus the Texas-based ballet soloist turned social media sensation. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 4, 2021

Kids between 5 and 11 in Texas begin getting vaccinated for COVID-19, and reports indicate demand for vaccination is high. The first shots to young children in Texas and among the first in the nation have been administered at a hospital in Houston. We’ll hear from the COVID-19 Task Force Co-Chair at Texas Children’s Hospital. Also, the Texas gulf coast getting swallowed up? A new investigative report shows direct effects of climate change. And you’ve heard of CPS, Chld Protective Services, but what about APS? The Standard’s Joy Diaz with more on a lesser known safety net for adults. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 3, 2021

Eight constitutional amendments, all 8 approved by voters. And local ballot measures, too. Any way to tease out political change in Texas? We’ll explore. Other stories we’re tracking: wind turbines set to join oil rigs in along the Texas coast? We’ll have more on big plans for renewable power generation in the Gulf of Mexico. Also more people, less water. How North Texas is planning for the future and why some residents are not going with the flow. And Texas has been home to many icons, including some iconic words. Commentator W.F. Strong on a certain noun with Texas ties that’s gone global. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 2, 2021

SB8, the state’s new abortion law, is in the crosshairs of the U.S. Supreme Court. On the day after oral arguments, where does the law stand? What clues can be drawn about the future of abortion restrictions after yesterday’s high court questioning in two cases challenging SB8? We’ll explore. Other stories we’re tracking: a new poll shows a tight race between Governor Greg Abbott and a certain democrat yet to officially announce his intentions. We’ll have details. Also, you’ve heard about winterization to avoid a repeat of last winters massive blackouts…but what does that actually entail? Those stories and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 5, 2021

Two Black members of congress give testimony at the state capitol. At stake: political maps that would break up communities of color. We’ll have the latest on the fight over representation and redistricting in Texas. Also, it started as a petition to force the hiring of more police officers. Now, why a local proposition could have echoes and reverberations statewide. And an estimated 40% of Texas nursing home workers are unvaccinated. How a change in the law may create a shortage of nursing home workers, and the help that facilities are asking for from the state. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 8, 2021

We’ve gathered up reporters from around the state and have their expertise on how a special legislative session works and what can be accomplished. Also, what is Critical Race Theory and who is teaching it in Texas? And how the city of Abilene hopes to never lose access to water again. Plus a theater play called “Family Dollar”, how a community’s true stories of gentrification gave birth to this play. And the philosophy and goals of QAnon in Texas’ politics, from local to state-wide. Also, to unwind and relax – how about an outdoor movie and you be the host? Everything you need to know to put together your home-made theater is next. That and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 6, 2021

Today is the day when you will learn what SB7 stands for. In short it’s the voting bill that was killed but could come back, we’ll have the latest. Also, Immigration courts are re-opening today after being out for a year, we’ll have details. Plus, are you one of the 3.4 million Texans who are caring for an adult family member? It’s pricey and it’s uncomfortable to put a price tag on their care, but there may be some help on the way. And do you know your history? What about your Asian American history? And speaking of history and historic moments – the story of the first astronaut to do an untethered space walk. All of that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 1, 2021

As March rolls in, the effects of the February winter storm continue to ripple across rural Texas. We’ll have a conversation with local officials. Also, a new month, the rent is due, and the home is still a wreck broken pipes, to water damage and worse. Any of this sound familiar? What are your rights? We’ll get answers from an expert. Also a new COVID-19 vaccine gets federal approval. What it means for Texans waiting to get the shot. And the state’s biggest university temporarily waves the SAT and ACT requirement. The shape of longer-term things to come in higher ed? And Texas researchers connect the dots on dinosaur extinction. All those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Winter 2021

Texans have been suffering this week in the prolonged bitter cold, without power and without water. This Typewriter Rodeo poem is recognition of that suffering combined with the hope we continue to help each other through it.

Texas Standard: February 18, 2021

What did ERCOT know and when did they know it? As millions of Texans still struggle with power outages pressure builds for clear answers. Members of Congress among others demanding straightforward explanations for the collapse of the power grid and uneven distribution of so-called rolling blackouts that left many in the dark and cold for days. Compounding matters, sources for safe water drying up in several parts of Texas as supplies are shut off to deal with cracked pipes and treatment issues. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: February 15, 2021

As the temperatures fall, along with precipitation, millions of Texans stranded or worse by winter weather. Coming up, conversations with reporters from across Texas on how Texans are weathering conditions that have brought large parts of the state to a standstill. Also, missing out on the vaccine but getting something else instead: scammed. A report from Houston. Plus a major disconnect with rural Texas: concerns that a lack of broadband is leaving some Texas towns far behind. And new efforts to reunite families separated by U.S. immigration policies. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 7, 2020

With under three months until election day, the Biden campaign getting pressure to pull out the stops in Texas to seize an historic moment, we’ll have the latest. Also, face to face with an interface: in an era of zoom meetings, Child Protective Services takes family visits online. And presidential rhetoric reconsidered. The Texan author of Demagogue for President makes the case that some of it is genius. Plus listeners have more questions about COVID-19. Dr. Fred Campbell of UT Health San Antonio has answers. Plus the week in politics from the Texas Tribune and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 24, 2020

Houstonians shaken overnight by an explosion. We’ll explore the details. Also, we remember PBS host Jim Lehrer, the national star who spent years in the Lone star state died Thursday. Plus perceptions of U.S. troops stationed in Ukraine amid the president’s impeachment trial. And is this hemp or is it marijuana? Well, if in Austin there’s no need to fret if carrying small amounts. Also, adding and subtracting with Texas Instruments, the brand that brought us the calculators of the past is making news. All of those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 15, 2020

The Democratic presidential debate: the last before voting begins in this years contest. We’ll explore whether anything might have made a difference to voters in the Lone Star State. Also, wage violations: a new law likely to insulate some of America’s biggest franchises. And a unique way of talking among many Texans: has Spanglish become a language all its own? All those stores plus a Politifact check and more today on the Standard: