Water

The Rio Grande is getting saltier. What’s that mean for agriculture?

The U.S. Supreme Court will weigh in on SB4, the controversial Texas law that allows state and local police to arrest and prosecute migrants who enter the state, after delaying implementation of the law last week.
A lack of medical insurance and access to treatment is making life in rural Texas tougher than many might imagine.
Energy insider Matt Smith has the latest on rising gas prices as many Texans hit the road for Spring Break.
The Rio Grande, the body of water that outlines the border between Texas and Mexico, is becoming saltier – affecting people, farmland and livestock on both sides of the border.
And: Amid a statewide teacher shortage, one Central Texas school district is trying to turn things around by creating its own pipeline of new recruits.

The latest on the Smokehouse Creek Fire in the Panhandle

The Smokehouse Creek Fire in the Panhandle, already the second biggest wildfire in Texas history, is so far 0% contained. We’ll talk with an evacuee and officials with the Texas A&M Forest Service to get the latest.
With increasingly unpredictable rainfall and extended droughts, you may be thinking about what to plant to survive our new weather reality. The Standard’s Alexandra Hart has ways you can cut water use without letting your lawn die.
Plus: Director Richard Linklater and filmmaker Alex Stapleton on the new HBO three-part series based on Lawrence Wright’s recent book “God Save Texas.”

A younger generation is taking over the Texas oil fields

For the first time in centuries, an American-built – and more specifically, Texas-built – spacecraft has touched down on the moon.
Multiple law enforcement officers who responded to the 2022 Uvalde school shooting have been ordered to appear before a grand jury investigating the failed police response.
The folks calling the shots in the Texas oil industry seem to be getting younger. What does this change mean for the industry?
A giant among advocates for people with disabilities in Texas steps down after a quarter century. We’ll talk with Dennis Borel of the Coalition of Texans with Disabilities about the challenges ahead.
Plus, the week in politics with The Texas Tribune.

Ballet folklórico competition comes to North Texas

Former president and presidential candidate Donald Trump wades into Texas politics with downballot endorsements.
Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton takes aim at a faith-based group in El Paso providing services for migrants.
In Texas farm country, concerns grow over a lack of water.
In the congressional district that includes 800 miles of the state’s border with Mexico, four republicans are challenging the GOP incumbent as polls show high voter interest in border security.
Plus: High schools push for competitive ballet folklórico.

KUT Morning Newscast for February 12, 2024

Central Texas top stories for February 12, 2024. The City of Leander moves into phase four of its water conservation plan. Texas GOP censures Texas House Speaker Dade Phelan. Shooting at Lakewood Church in Houston over the weekend. Del Valle ISD school board open seat application deadline is today. Landowners in Williamson County are raising concerns over the county’s water supply.

Texas frackers are going electric – but can the grid handle it?

With a push from Texas Republicans, the U.S. House moves a step closer toward a vote to impeach the head of Homeland Security.

Amid a shortage of teachers statewide, a move in Dallas to get more men of color in the classroom.

In the Texas oilfields, how a push for greener drilling has some worried about the effects on the power grid.

A browser update for the ages? Why new features in Google Chrome have one tech writer warning of the end of the human internet.

And Temu takeover? Why U.S. giants like Amazon and Walmart are rethinking their strategies as a China-based retailer turns up the heat.

Could Texas’ electric grid finally connect to other states?

A grand jury in Uvalde will consider possible charges over law enforcement’s failed response to the mass shooting at Robb Elementary.

An Air Force general who was stationed at Joint Base San Antonio-Randolph faces a court-martial over charges of sexually assaulting a subordinate.

The Texas power grid is famously separate from the rest of the country – but a plan has been quietly moving forward to connect it to a grid operating in the southeastern U.S.

And: Shipping lanes are shifting routes amid attacks in the Red Sea. What are the ripple effects in Texas?

Celebrating a century of Texas state parks

Dozens of Texas school districts have sued to stop changes in the A-F grading system used to evaluate schools.

The manager of the state’s power grid is out with a new forecast for winter. How prepared is Texas for another statewide freeze like 2021?

Israel, Hamas and disinformation on social media: Tech expert Omar Gallaga joins us with more.

New numbers in the race for mayor of Texas’ biggest city.

And a new book written by longtime Texas conservationist George Bristol, “Texas State Parks: The First 100 Years,” tells the story of how the state’s parks began.

Dallas pastor stuck in Israel shares what he’s seen amid renewed conflict with Hamas

A third special session of the Texas Legislature gets underway and it’s not just education that’s on the agenda. Although the governor’s push for a so-called education savings accounts is getting the lion’s share of attention as the session starts, border security is rising fast as a top issue. Julián Aguilar of the Texas Newsroom joins us with more.

As Texas lawmakers offer support for Israel, some Texans are feeling the effects of war firsthand. We’ll talk with the head of a Dallas interfaith group caught in Israel at the outbreak of fighting, now trying to get himself and his colleagues back home safely.

KUT Morning Newscast for September 20, 2023

Central Texas top stories for September 20, 2023. More information on the centuries old bodies in the Oakwood Cemetery. Vote on Central Health’s budget is delayed. City of Kyle starts buying water from San Marcos.

KUT Morning Newscast for September 18, 2023

Central Texas top stories for September 18, 2023. Ken Paxton’s trial ends and is acquitted. Austin ISD to take vote on special education plan. Georgetown school board discusses if Chaplins can be school councilors.

KUT Morning Newscast for September 1, 2023

Central Texas top stories for September 1, 2023. Updates on North Austin Arboretum shooting. Integral Care prepares for layoffs. New water restrictions for Central Texas.

KUT Morning Newscast for August 22 2023

Central Texas top stories for August 22 2023. Wildfire near Luling. CapMetro feedback. Hays County Database. Hutto Stage 3 Water Restrictions. Kids Fostering Seniors.  

Why the film and TV strikes are at an awful time for Texas

A change in leadership in the embattled Texas foster care system is bringing with it some optimism.

Texas doesn’t have enough space in psychiatric hospitals, so some people are staying in jails instead. We’ll explore their legal limbo.

A new investigation from the Dallas Morning News explores the history and impact of excessive use of police force in Dallas.

The film strikes in Hollywood are having more than just ripple effects here in Texas – why the timing was especially bad for the state.

And it’s Friday, so that means the Typewriter Rodeo and a wrap of the week in Texas politics.

Tours from Beyoncé and Taylor Swift are big for local economies

COVID cases in Texas rise by almost 25% in a week as concerns mount over a new variant. Although the vast majority of Texans have given up masks and social distancing, health officials say they’re still important tools as cases pick up and students return to the classroom. Dr. Catherine Troisi of UTHealth Houston joins us with an update.

Young plaintiffs in Montana score a high-profile victory in a fight to force their home state to take climate change more seriously. Could a similar approach work in Texas?

And: Tours from Beyoncé and Taylor Swift are generating huge spending on everything from concert tickets and merch to spillover effects on travel, clothing and more.

San Antonio nonprofit forges community for veterans through knife-making

An increasing border presence by state troopers has led to a rise in police chases ending in crashes in El Paso.

A once-pregnant prison guard who says she was told she couldn’t leave her shift as she was experiencing contraction-like pains is now suing over the death of her child. Texas Tribune reporter Jolie McCullough joins with more.

In the wake of a San Antonio police shooting of a woman with mental health issues and an investigation of officers involved, questions remain about how well the department polices itself.

And a San Antonio nonprofit, Reforged, helps veterans forge ahead through knife-making classes and a peer-support group.

Unraveling the ‘Iron Pipeline’ of gun smuggling from Texas to Mexico

Following the state’s takeover of Houston schools, a plan to eliminate libraries and use the space for kids who misbehave in class.

Watch that water bill: Not only is use up, some municipalities are raising rates to try to drive down demand.

A three-part series explores how the Texas Attorney General’s Office became an incubator for conservative legal strategies that are reshaping Texas and the nation. Eleanor Klibanoff of the Texas Tribune joins with more.

A new focus on trying to cut down the flow of arms from Texas into Mexico.

And we’ll talk to Sethward, the Texan who’s become a viral sensation for losing on “America’s Got Talent.”

Workers rally to fight state bill ending water breaks

As Texans brace for another week of extreme heat, there’s pushback against a new state law that nullifies local rules requiring mandatory water breaks for outdoor workers.

Austin has ended its policing partnership with the Department of Public Safety – but Gov. Greg Abbott is sending more troopers to the capital city.

Some legal experts say the Supreme Court’s student debt decision may have scrambled the issue of standing, or whether a plaintiff has enough interest in a particular matter to stand before the court to request legal intervention. UT Law professor Stephen Vladeck explains.

And a new documentary on Jesse Treviño honors the late San Antonio artist, long considered one of the city’s finest.

Musician Amanda Shires on her collaboration with Bobbie Nelson

Hundreds of nurses are on a one-day strike in Austin, in what’s expected to be the largest nurses’ strike in Texas history.

Texans know summer heat, but these temperatures can be dangerous. A doctor shares important information on protecting yourself and others.

Residents living in colonias on the border who lack clean, safe drinking water say they’re the target of predatory practices.

And musician Amanda Shires on her new album “Loving You,” a collaboration with the the late great Bobbie Nelson.

Texas House committee recommends impeaching Attorney General Ken Paxton

As the Texas Legislature moves into the final hours of the 88th session, a Republican-led House committee has issued 20 articles of impeachment against state Attorney General Ken Paxton, alleging a yearslong pattern of misconduct by the state’s top law enforcement official.

What happened to the $30 billion+ surplus lawmakers started out with this session?

Revenge of the Swifties: A bill signed into law this week cracks down on robot ticket scalpers.

And Mando Rayo on the art of the taco truck.