SCOTUS

Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg died September 18. She is remembered as a force in the legal community — staunchly working towards gender equality. She was the inspiration for this Typewriter Rodeo poem.

Texas Standard: April 10, 2020

Despite hundreds of suspected positives for COVID-19 at Texas nursing homes, the state is refusing to release detailed data. Why the secrecy? We’ll take a closer look. Plus, nearly 1 in 3 apartment renters didn’t pay anything to their landlord April 1st. What happens next depends on where you live. Some tips for tenants from an expert. Also eliminating the insanity defense, unconstitutional? You might be surprised by the answer. And our go to expert from UT Health San Antonio answers your COVID-19 questions. All of that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: February 25, 2020

The Supreme Court says it won’t intervene in a high profile Texas death row appeal. But that might not be their last word on the case of Rodney Reed, we’ll have details. Also after El Paso, Midland Odessa, Sutherland Springs and Santa Fe high, are attitudes about gun control shaping up to be a factor in the Texas vote this year? We’ll take a closer look. Plus a death by feral hog: why a Texas community is second-guessing the official account. All of those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: February 11, 2020

What’s in the President’s proposed budget and what are the many ways in which it affects Texans? Maintenance for the wall in the years to come. Who’ll be paying for that? We’ll take a look. And did you know California banned state-funded travel to Texas? Well, Texas is fighting back. We’ll take a look at what that means for children in state care. Plus, machines that discriminate. Can algorithms be less biased? Also, how well do you know your Civil War History? Those stories and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 11, 2019

What could be one of the most consequential Supreme Court cases this term, affecting tens of thousands of people in Texas. The nation’s highest court set to hear arguments over DACA, the program that protects some 700 thousand people from deportation. President trump’s tried to unravel it. We’ll look more closely at what’s at stake. Also, is Mexico taking a page from president Trump’s policy toward migrant families? Separation south of the border. And what does it mean to get good at responding to mass shootings? All of those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 9, 2019

What does sex mean? What’s at issue as the Supreme Court considers whether federal law prohibits discrimination against people who identify as LGBTQ. We’ll have the latest. Also, sparks fly as a Texas professor wins the Nobel Prize for his work on batteries, we’ll have details. And new numbers raise new questions over Border Patrol apprehensions, up 90 percent over last year. Plus a Texas researcher warns women using the pill, this is your brain on birth control. We’ll hear what she means and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 12, 2019

The President’s plan to dramatically cut the numbers of asylum seekers in the U.S. gets the green light from the U.S. Supreme court, at least temporarily. We’ll have the latest. Also, Texas back in the spotlight on the national political stage once again as Democrats descend on Houston for tonight’s round three of that party’s presidential debates. And confusion in Texas and elsewhere when it comes to kids and vaping. We’ll try to get some answers from the commissioner of state health services. Plus the legacy of T. Boone pickens and remembering Daniel Johnston. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 29, 2019

Defense Department Money reallocated to build a border wall gets the green light from the U.S. Supreme Court. What the decision means for Texas. Plus, one of the longest serving members of the Trump administration steps down, and a Texas congressman being talked about as his replacement as the new director of national intelligence, we’ll have details. And give me a home where the cattle won’t roam? The Texas attorney general gets tapped to weigh in on a fight over keeping cattle at home on the range:

Texas Standard: May 15, 2019

A potential challenge to Rowe vs. Wade by Alabama lawmakers as a federal appeals court hears a Texas case that could sharply curb abortion access, we’ll have the latest. Also thousands of fish, crabs and other sea life wash up dead along Galveston bay. Oystering there is closed until further notice. A clampdown on seafood safety on the Texas gulf after a chemical spill, we’ll have details. And the return of the so-called education degree in Texas. Plus, has Texas removed more Confederate monuments than any other state? A politifact check and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 24, 2019

The Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits employment discrimination on the basis of sex. But what about sexual orientation? We’ll take a closer look at the Supreme Court’s decision to hear a trio of cases with the potential of expanding gay lesbian and transgender rights. Also, 3 scientists being fired amid espionage fears at Houston’s prestigious M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. And we’ve been hearing about Central American migrants at the border: a surprising number waiting in Ciudad Ju├írez are coming in from Cuba. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 20, 2019

How much does Texas stand to lose if president Trump’s emergency declaration holds? The Pentagon does the numbers. Projects at Fort Bliss, Fort Hood and Joint Base San Antonio all on the chopping block if money is diverted to a border wall. We’ll have details. Also, what could be the next hot ticket for career builders: as the Texas University launches a masters degree in dementia studies. And when it comes to fortune 500 companies, does a texas city really hold the top spot in the nation? A Politifact check and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 25, 2019

Slate magazine claims the supreme court is preparing to make every states gun laws look like Texas, but is that claim on target? We’ll take a closer look. Also, when was the last time a nuclear arms treaty was making headlines? Why some are warning of a renewed arms race with Russia. And we’ll take a look at the week that was in Texas politics, plus an original Cosmic Cowboy comes home again: singer songwriter Michael Martin Murphy teams up with who’s who of Texas talent in search of old Austin. All those stories and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 23, 2019

The Supreme Court appears to take DACA off the table in shutdown negotiations, but where does that leave thousands of DACA recipients in Texas? We’ll explore. Also in the Texas Standard newsroom, another Supreme Court order we’re assessing: the impact of the reinstatement of the Trump administration’s so-called transgender military ban. We’ll take a look at the impact of those seeking to serve. And police, veterans, cancer research, political action committees have formed around lots of worthy causes. But where’s the money going? A look at so called scam pacs and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 3, 2019

The calendars have switched over to 2019 and that means some new Texas laws are or will soon go into effect. We’ll tell you what you need to know. Also, Mexico’s new president is making the entire border with the U.S. into a special zone to encourage would-be migrants to stay put. We’ll ask one expert whether the plan will work. Plus, jobs these days often involve sitting at a desk and getting food is as easy as pushing a button… How our hunter-gatherer bodies aren’t adapting. And have you ever seen an albino cockroach? It may not be what you think. All that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 10, 2018

With a Kavanaugh on the court, what does that mean for Texas?

Coming up, a scholar on politics and the law from Rice University weighs in on how the new Supreme Court nominee might tilt the balance on issues that have become hot buttons in Texas politics.

Also, Todd Gilmann on the Dallas Morning News, with more on what happens next and the role for Texas’ two senators…

Is Texas too small for two vet schools? A&M says yes, Texas Tech says rubbish- or something quite like that.

Also, songwriting legend Radney Foster, conjunto like your grandad never knew- and the rest of what’s making news in Texas on this Tuesday.

Texas Standard: July 9, 2018

The president announces his choice for the Supreme Court -but is it his pick or someone elses? A brief history of high court picks and how tonight fits in- today on the Standard.

The Attorney General spends half a million dollars on expert testimony defending the state’s abortion restrictions. How much bang for the buck? You might be surprised –the Houston Chronicle’s Alejandra Matos joins us.

Help wanted signs dot the oilfields, not enough men to fill the jobs, the push is on for more women. And now something that may make the work a bit for comfortable for those new female roughnecks.

Plus, what a so-called failed school in Houston could teach the rest of Texas.

Texas Standard: July 5, 2018

A new outbreak in Texas of a fast spreading parasitic disease. How bad is it and where’s it coming from? We’ll hear about the search for answers. Also, critics are calling it the treason trip. A group of Republicans from Capitol Hill spending their Independence Day break in Moscow meeting with Russian officials to discuss what exactly? And why does the trip appear shrouded in secrecy? And Elon Musk built a battery the size of a football field to supply solar power to south Australia. Now there’s a plan for something similar in west Texas. We’ll look at whether it could be enough to spark an energy revolution and why packing the court has returned to our political dialogue. All of that and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 4, 2018

Two years after Fisher vs. University of Texas, the Trump administration urges colleges to drop consideration of race in admissions, we’ll look at the implications. Also, how a debate over water flowing from Georgia to Florida is trickling into Texas. And 20 years ago this summer, a Texan trying to save his job not only struck paydirt, his little well would change the world, we’ll hear how and why. And a modern day dinosaur from Texas who took over TV screens around the world. Fire up the grill and grab a lawn chair, the Texas Standard is back on the air:

Texas Standard: June 26, 2018

Critics call it the tent city at Tornillo, now set to be dismantled. Is it a sign of a policy change or strictly a business decision? We’ll explore. Also, you’ll get your kids back if you sign this paper to deport yourself. That’s the claim being made by some detainees and their attorneys at a detention center south of Houston. The Texas Tribune got the story, we’ll talk with one of the reporters. And a win for Texas before the Supreme Court and what it means for future legal claims over race discrimination. Also the populist, nationalist, politically incorrect candidate polls say is set to win Mexico’s election: and how he could change fortunes in Texas. All that and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 30, 2018

After the Santa Fe massacre, and a week of roundtables, the Governor comes up with a blueprint to improve safety in Texas public schools, we’ll have the latest. Also, how high is that oft-cited wall between church and state? A new report from the associated press claims we’re witnessing an important moment for religiously conservative attorneys landing positions of power and policy behind the scenes, we’ll hear more. And U.S. politics may get dirty at times, but never as deadly as in Mexico right now. Record number of assassinations of candidates as the nation prepares to pick a president July 1st. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard: