Houston

Texas Standard: February 25, 2021

After days of finger pointing and demands for accountability, hearings get underway at the Texas Capitol to get the the bottom of last weeks outages. We’ll have the latest. Also, details from the governor’s statewide address last night on what comes next as Texans demand answers in the wake of last week, and solutions to prevent such failures in the future. And what Texas can learn from Australia when it comes to massive power outages and the politics of renewable energy. Plus a federal judge puts an indefinite hold on President Biden’s attempts to freeze deportations at the border. The implications plus much today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: February 22, 2021

Stop right there: an order from the public utility commission to put the brakes on outrageous power bills after the winter storm. As lawmakers step in to get answers to ongoing questions about who and what’s to blame for the meltdown in utilities statewide, another long term ripple effect looms: the impact to Texas’s reputation. We’ll hear more. Also hurricanes, pandemic, then a winter storm… what compounding natural disasters can do to mental health in Texas, and what to look out for, yourself. Plus with the power back on for most, many Texans still dealing with water issues. We’ll have expert advice on tap and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: February 3, 2021

New executive orders on asylum seekers and family separation policies at the border get a lukewarm reception from advocates for change. President Biden orders an official review of the remain in Mexico policies. Some are asking why not just change the policy? Also COVID-19 and the double squeeze on nonprofits. More demand for their services, but less money to provide those services… We’ll explore. And the governor’s call for legislation to further restrict abortion access in Texas. Are republican lawmakers hoping for a fight in the high court? Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 27, 2021

6 days into the Biden Administration and Texas’ Attorney General has successfully, if temporarily, reversed a deportation ban. Ken Paxton’s lawsuit against the Biden administration puts a temporary stop on the president’s attempts to change immigration enforcement. What happens next? We’ll explore. Also, for many the symptoms of COVID-19 don’t last very long. Now, what Texas researchers are finding out about those who suffer long term. And another take on the impact of increasing the minimum wage, more harm than good? We’ll explore. And a day of remembrance for a time we must ‘never forget’. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 26, 2021

In Texas’ most populous metro area, a rethink of how the COVID-19 vaccine is being distributed, we’ll have the latest. Plus, when the Texas capitol city cut the budget for its police department by almost a third last year, Texas’ governor warned there would be a price to pay. Now, with the Texas legislature in session, what the governor plans to do to keep other Texas cities from following Austin’s move. And the Biden administration’s plan to increase the minimum wage. Is now the right time and do the numbers add up? Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: December 2, 2020

With Texas reporting new record high numbers of Coronavirus cases, a warning from Washington that more needs to be done, we’ll have details. Also, as the fight against COVID-19 continues, setbacks reported in the war against human trafficking in Texas. Plus high hopes versus realistic expectations: with change at the White House, what Texas immigrant rights advocates think they’ll see when it comes to changes on the ground. And rarely has a nation been so well served by a people so ill treated. Now the postal service set to celebrate the Japanese American soldiers who saved thousands of Texans in WWII. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 19, 2020

Millions of Texans turn out for week one of early voting in a state notorious for low turnout. A hint of a more fundamental change in Texas politics? That and more today on the Texas Standard.

In this most unconventional election season the state to watch is Texas: so declares veteran political journalist Dan Balz of the Washington Post. We’ll ask him what makes Texas the most intriguing place in politics in the nation right now.

Also, a rule change for social workers in Texas dialing back anti-discrimination protections based on sexual orientation, gender identity and disability. Many social workers call it a gut punch.

Texas Standard: October 12, 2020

Just one day away from the first in-person voting in the 2020 general election in Texas, and a major legal fight still n play over absentee ballots. A bitter back and forth over drop off points for mail in ballots, even as they’re already being collected. What this last-minute legal battle portends for an unprecedented number of Texas voters. Also, answers to listener questions about mail in voting, and the pandemic. And an unexpected boom in natural gas prices. Plus, going going gone? historic letters under lock and key in Mexico city discovered at auction. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 18, 2020

We are open for business is the latest announcement from Texas Governor Greg Abbott, we’ll have the latest. Nursing homes gear up to receive visitors next week. And protests are part of civic life and so is voting. Will summer protestors turn into fall voters? Also when contact tracing is lost in translation. How that affects in the fight against COVID-19. And how a photojournalist’s life is marked by a loss she experienced as a baby. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 15, 2020

No other state has shown as many cracks in its system of counting COVID-19 cases as Texas. Now the numbers are set to shift again. Why is Texas having such trouble with Coronavirus case counts? Edgar Walters of the Texas Tribune has the latest. Also, a plan for affordable housing gets slammed as a tax windfall for developers, we’ll hear why. And an indigenous tribe pushes the University of Texas to hand over Native American remains. Plus the ultimate how to book for those ready to leave it all behind: How to Astronaut. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 11, 2020

Half of Houstonians rent their homes but the city hasn’t passed protections against eviction in this current economic situation. We’ll take a closer look. Plus- to play ball or not. The field of college sports is starting to look very different as we near the start of seasons. And another uncertain future? American agriculture. Actually, the future looks certainly dire unless there are some changes. Then there’s school reopening. We’ll hear from a former U.S. Secretary of Education about why we have to try and how to do it safer. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 5, 2020

After first asking for an extension to complete the census count, a sudden u-turn. The impact on Texas could last for a decade or more, we’ll have details. Also, more women are unemployed now than at any time since the late 1940’s, and women of color are among the hardest hit. What some are calling America’s first female recession, and what’s behind it. And residents along the gulf coast finding more effective ways to deal with an active hurricane season amid a pandemic. Plus a claim that 1 in 3 texans can’t access health insurance. A Politifact check and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 4, 2020

New numbers on COVID-19 testing in Texas tell us what, exactly? An investigative report by the Houston Chronicle says many Coronavirus test results are not included in official counts trying to chart the spread of COVID-19. We’ll hear why not and what it means for efforts to stem the spread of the virus. Also, El Paso students reflect on the deadliest attack on Latinos in modern U.S. history, one year on. And newsman Dan Rather on a plan to improve education. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 23, 2020

According to published reports, the Rio Grande Valley may have the worst rate of COVID-19 hospitalization in the country. We’ll talk with the mayor of Harlingen today. Also, food banks across the Lone Star State brace for increased demand in August. We’ll hear why. Plus more on the abrupt shutdown of the Chinese consulate in Houston as the Trump administration ratchets up pressure with espionage claims. And the app from a China based company that some lawmakers are trying to ban. Tech expert Omar Gallaga with details. All of that and then some today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 22, 2020

The state’s largest school district has plans to start the year online and could extend that a little more. Houston ISD’s interim superintendent joins us to talk about the weight of planning this school year. We’ll also hear from teachers who are frankly afraid for themselves and their families, but also love being in the classroom. And a Texas law expert joins us to parse out exactly what’s going on with federal agents arresting people in Portland. Plus a harrowing story about COVID-19 and Texas ICE detention centers. That and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 14, 2020

New York City: once considered the national epicenter in the fight against COVID-19, now health experts fear a Texas city has taken its place. Hospitals in Houston struggling to deal with the pandemic on a scale similar to that of New York City in late spring. Our conversation with New York Times reporter Dr.Sherri Fink. Also, a warning from climatologists about a coming drought that could reshape Texas for the long term. And getting schooled by Selena: a Texas University launches a first of its kind course. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 9, 2020

Calling it a clear and present danger to Texas’ biggest city, the mayor of Houston cancels the upcoming Texas Republican Convention, we’ll have details. Also, as metro areas sound alarms over the rise of Coronavirus cases, few counties have been as hard hit as one in a remote part of northeast Texas: the view from Titus county. Also in a state that likes to toot its horn as number one, new numbers from the census are nothing to brag about. Why Texas ranks near the bottom in an important census year metric, and what that could add up to. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 3, 2020

After days of resisting calls from local leaders, governor Abbott imposes fines for those who refuse to use facial coverings in public, saying it’s a necessary step to avoid a return to another lockdown as virus cases set new records in Texas. We’ll have the latest. Also, a first person story of becoming a U.S. citizen in a period of pandemic. Plus the week in politics with the Texas Tribune and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 29, 2020

The U.S. Supreme Court upholds an important decision in a case concerning access to abortions, closely watched in the Lone Star State. We’ll have the latest. Also, amid a pandemic, the start of early voting statewide in primary runoff elections. What’s been called a dry run for November. And a second look at a string of police shootings in Houston that predate the killing of George Floyd, and what they could mean for the future of police transparency. Plus Texas researchers develop a sensor to distinguish between symptoms of the flu and COVID-19. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 15, 2020

A spike in COVID-19 hospitalizations in Texas raising concerns, we’ll have the latest. Other stories we’re tracking: troops that refused to deploy to cities during demonstrations over the killing of George Floyd now face possible discipline. Also the tweet from Texas that sparked a national conversation about life as a person of color in higher ed’s ivory tower. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard: