flooding

Four dead after severe storms batter Houston, East Texas

Deadly and destructive storms sweep across downtown Houston, killing four and leaving hundreds of thousands without power. We’ll have an update on the latest as damage assessment and recovery efforts are underway.
A new controversy surrounding Houston Superintendent Mike Miles is getting the attention of state lawmakers and the Texas Education Agency – this one involving an apparent transfer of Texas education dollars to charter schools in Colorado.
Plus: the week in politics with Matthew Watkins of The Texas Tribune.

As floodwaters recede, how to protect your home from mold

Voting maps in Galveston County are in the spotlight as the 5th Circuit takes up an unusual challenge to allegations of racial gerrymandering. Why the outcome could have broader implications.
After flooding in East Texas due to recent storms, what can be done to prevent the risk of mold?
Starting a small business with members of the family – what could go wrong? Austin-based entrepreneur and business coach Andy O’Brien shares his new book on red flags and how to deal with them.
And: Can a bite of Texas barbecue really change your life? Texas Monthly’s Daniel Vaughn on a bite that changed his.

What does Azerbaijan want with Texas politicians?

After weeks of rains in East Texas, hope for a shift into recovery mode is on hold with more rain tap for today and much of this week.
Strong winds, hail damage, what next? Sangita Menon of KUT News looks at the next steps of navigating insurance.
What does Azerbaijan want from Texas? Christopher Hooks of Texas Monthly shares how the indictment of U.S. Rep. Henry Cuellar may be just the tip of the iceberg.
For decades, the Tower Life building defined San Antonio’s skyline. Changes are on the horizon after the building’s recent sale – but tours are being offered first.
Also: A new report on the pace of global renewable energy shows how Texas and the U.S. stack up.

What we know about the bribery charges faced by U.S. Rep. Henry Cuellar

Heavy rains led to severe flooding in parts of Harris County and counties to the north, prompting evacuations, boat rescues and substantial property damage. We’ll get an update on the latest.
Texans voted in numerous municipal elections over the weekend. How some closely watched races turned out.
Democratic U.S. Rep. Henry Cuellar and his wife were indicted late last week on conspiracy and bribery charges, accused of accepting bribes in connection with Azerbaijan.
On the one-year anniversary of a mass shooting at an outlet mall in Allen, Asian American groups call for a hate crime designation.
And: PETA has released the results of a years-long investigation into unlicensed horse racing, which they call particularly prevalent in Texas.

Is Tesla running out of power?

Twisters up north, flooding to the east, wildfire dangers out in the far west and a forecast that won’t let up… yet. Boat rescues reported in central east Texas and many road closures as riverbanks swell from the rain. Meteorologist Eric Berger with the latest and what to expect.
On the heels of layoffs in April, the state’s wealthiest resident moves to make deeper cuts at the nation’s top EV maker. A tipping point for Tesla?
An update on what Travis County officials describe as the worst outbreak of opioid overdoses in years.
Plus, a preview of a new podcast exploring the state’s takeover of the Texas’ biggest school district.

The growing union drive in tech

Extreme weather brings flooding and evacuations to an area near the Trinity River. We’ll find out how folks are coping with all that water.
Police remove protestors trying to set up camp on the UT Austin campus.
A new book takes a look at the Republic of Texas – an armed secession movement in the Davis Mountains of West Texas. It happened nearly 30 years ago. Could we see it again?
Also, as union membership grows across the Lone Star State, what does that mean for tech workers and why they face challenges unionizing?

Texas Eclipse Festival attendees with disabilities describe treacherous conditions

Landowners in southeast Texas say they should be able to sue the state over their flooded property, and the U.S. Supreme Court agrees. People in Winnie, Texas, say their land only started to flood after the state rebuilt part of nearby Interstate 10. Now, they can seek compensation for the damages.
Live music seems more expensive, but are musicians getting paid more? Not really. We’ll talk to someone trying to change that.
And the attorney general crusades against a media outlet on behalf of Elon Musk.

The state welcomed 475,000 new Texans in a year

Large parts of North Texas are cleaning up after severe storms swept the region, but weather dangers continue.
As sea levels rise, cities along the Texas Gulf Coast are sinking. A new report is raising red flags.
Boom times in Texas continue, with new census figures showing the Lone Star State growing faster than any other.
Should Texas’ senior senator, John Cornyn, be worried about a political challenge from AG Ken Paxton? Gromer Jeffers of the Dallas Morning News explains.
Plus: The week in politics with the Texas Tribune and more.

KUT Morning Newscast for January 23, 2024

Central Texas top stories for January 23, 2024. Flood risk. CapMetro’s on-demand transit service Pickup is struggling to stay on schedule. More reactions to Art Acevedo’s return to Austin. Texas teacher demographics. Federal hearing reveals abuse incidents in Texas foster placements.

KUT Afternoon Newscast for October 26, 2023

Central Texas top stories for October 26, 2023. Severe weather in Central Texas. Flood safety. Drought monitor. United Airlines flight attendants protest. National drug takeback day in Kyle. School voucher pushback. Georgetown drag show. CapMetro rules on alcohol consumption.

Texas Standard: September 29, 2022

The push among some republicans for Greg Abbott to declare an invasion at the southern border with Mexico. We’ll have the latest. Also, Texas #1 again: this time for toxic waste in water. Details of a new environmental report. Plus long COVID-19 has made so many Texans so sick, they can’t return to work. We take a closer look at the impact. And staying private online and why the usual changes to your settings may not be enough. Also one of the new stars of the Netflix series ‘Fate: The Winx Saga’ is a Texan in a role demanded by fans. We’ll talk with actor Paulina Chavez. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 28, 2022

In Florida, as flood warnings go out ahead of hurricane landfall, echoes of Texas’ Hurricane Harvey. The managing editor of space city weather with a live update on Hurricane Ian and parallels to a catastrophic storms in Houston. Also after relatively upbeat reports on Texas’ economy, is the Dallas fed changing its tune? Plus an update on the trial of the mass shooter accused in the attack on an El Paso Walmart. And non-profits taking a new tack to encourage Texas farmers to use less water. Plus a Politifact check of a claim about democrats objecting to presidential election outcomes. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 2, 2022

A vote about a change to the social studies curriculum in Texas public schools. Only it’s not the sort of vote some advocates wanted. Proposals to add teaching about Junetheenth, the murder of George Floyd and LGBTQ rights are on long term pause. We’ll hear the backstory. Also how what’s happening in San Antonio could give larger clues about how climate change is affecting Texas. And a perfect storm for animal shelters as more pets are abandoned, costs rising with inflation, and a shortage of vets and staffers have shelters scrambling. Plus the end of the bitcoin mining gold rush in Texas? The week in politics with the Texas tribune and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 25, 2022

Are billions in school debt owed by Texans about to be written off the books? We’ll look at what President Biden’s announcement adds up to for Texans. Other stories we’re tracking: buying out of flood prone property: what it could mean for a region ravaged by Hurricane Harvey 5 years ago. Also after this weeks rains in North Texas, how the struggle’s just beginning for some families. And as housing prices skyrocket across Texas and many parts of the nation, military allowances not keeping up. And is the University of Texas about to pass Harvard as the country’s wealthiest university?Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 13, 2021

Was election day in South Texas 2020 an omen for Democrats in 2022 and beyond? A prediction and a prescription getting a lot of attention. Coming up, a warning for democrats hoping to pick up swing states, and what it could mean for Texas. Also the Biden Administration’s plans for a border reopening. Angela Kocherga has more from El Paso. And the image of the firefighter: iconic, and often male. An effort to give teenage girls hands on experience that could lead to careers fighting wildfires. Plus Texas bracing for the effects of hurricane Pamela. We’ll have the latest on that front and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 13, 2021

Making good on a threat: Texas is suing over school mask mandates. We’ll take a look at what we know about a lawsuit against six Texas school districts. Also tropical storm Nicholas is headed towards the Texas Gulf Coast. We’ll discuss what the state and coastal cities are doing now and the implications as oil production is still offline from Hurricane Ida in Louisiana. And twenty years ago today… a disaster along the South Texas Coast. Remembering the Queen Isabella Causeway Collapse. Plus the Republican Party and Texas are practically synonymous in current politics but things have changed over the decades. A look back today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 10, 2021

The US attorney general says the Texas abortion law is one “all Americans should fear” in announcing a legal challenge to new abortion restrictions in Texas. We’ll hear about the justice departments plans. Plus officials hesitant to issue sweeping vaccine mandates out of fears of being sued may have it all wrong. So says a Texas scholar, we’ll hear why. And veterans, Gen-Z and 9/11… how different groups of Texans are reflecting on the attacks of 20 years ago. Plus the week in politics and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 9, 2021

For some communities in Texas when it rains, it pours. We’ll speak with the mayor of Rockport about the ongoing storms. Plus, a look at how vulnerable Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton may be on his next bid for office. And how proving that major transportation projects do not discriminate against riders can unleash massive amounts of money from the federal government. And how the punishment for a men’s soccer team is affecting a women’s soccer team, today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 31, 2021

Manslaughter indictments in the 2019 death of a Black motorist raising issues about the role of reality TV on policing, and the abuse of police power. Investigative reporter Tony Plohetski with details. Also, debunking myths about migrant children and teens being held in Texas, a Politifact check of claims about what’s happening at the border, the ripple effects of this year’s Suez bottleneck half a world away in the Lone Star State. Those stories and more coming up today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 24, 2020

Storm clouds gathering along the Texas coast as a tropical depression bears down on the Lone Star State. We’ll have more on the weather situation and what south Texas should be prepared for this weekend. Also as schools scramble to assemble reopening plans, high school football teams prepare to return to the field. We’ll have the latest. Plus, a cyber truck factory cruises into Texas, the 30th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, the week in politics with the Texas Tribune and much more today on the Texas Standard: