flooding

Texas Standard: July 24, 2020

Storm clouds gathering along the Texas coast as a tropical depression bears down on the Lone Star State. We’ll have more on the weather situation and what south Texas should be prepared for this weekend. Also as schools scramble to assemble reopening plans, high school football teams prepare to return to the field. We’ll have the latest. Plus, a cyber truck factory cruises into Texas, the 30th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, the week in politics with the Texas Tribune and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 15, 2020

National trends suggest people of color disproportionately affected by COVID-19. But in Texas, a data gap is leaving health officials empty handed. African American leaders call for the state to address concerns about a lack of data that could be the difference between life and death in some Texas communities. Harris County Commissioner and former State Senator Rodney Ellis joins us. Also, a much anticipated forecast ahead of hurricane season. And it’s only a game, or is it? How many Texans are spending their downtime online and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 26, 2019

A newly declassified complaint at the center of an historic hearing on Capitol Hill may test the question, is a cover up really worse than the crime? We’ll have a Texas perspective on the rising push toward impeachment. Also, after two major flood events more residents of the biggest city in Texas are asking, is Houston worth it? And an innovative program among women incarcerated in Texas to bring recidivism to zero. Plus, what the spectacular rise and fall of we work says about the state of the tech industry. All of that and then some today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 19, 2019

Life threatening conditions in parts of Southeast Texas as a tropical depression named Imelda moves inland and takes its toll. Water rescues underway as the first named storm since Harvey hits the Houston region. We’ll have details. Also, accusations of rising crime rates feeding into a big city mayoral contest in Texas. And, new smartphones hit the streets. Our go to tech guy on whether to buy in. All those stories and then some today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 11, 2019

The latest disturbance in the Gulf seems to be on track to hit Louisiana. But the next one could head this way. We’ll take a look at how Houston’s prepared since Harvey. Plus, a new school being built in the Texas Hill Country is billed as the most water efficient in the state. How it’s doing that and whether the model can be replicated. And strife in the tech industry. We’ll take a look at how planned Amazon protests are just one example of a potential shake-up. Also, we’ll look at teen curfews. Why some cities are reconsidering laws that punish minors for being out late or on a school day. All of that and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: February 14, 2019

A year and a half after the worst natural disaster in Texas history, 55 counties are still waiting for relief funds. What’s the hold up? Some counties in Harvey hit Texas say they stand to lose billions in federal funds if they can’t match what’s on the table, and the clock is ticking. We’ll have the latest. Also, property tax relief now on the fast track, we’ll have details. And plans for a new energy facility in Brownsville getting complicated because of a cat. Those stories and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 19, 2018

As Midterms approach, so do thousands of migrants from Honduras and Guatemala en route to the U.S. We’ll have the latest on not one but now two caravans of Central Americans headed north. Mexico sends its military to stop them, as many in the U.S. ponder the political implications in a heated election year. Also the Khashoggi affair hits home for a Texas based journalist and author. Lawrence wright on the death of a friend and the threat to freedom. Plus the week in politics with the Texas Tribune and much more on today’s Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 12, 2018

Turkey says it has tapes of the murder and torture of a Washington Post columnsit at the hands of the Saudis. How should the U.S. respond? The disappearance of journalist Jamal Khashoggi is creating geopolitical ripples, as Turkey works with U.S. officials over the Khashoggi affair, and this morning, orders the release of a U.S. pastor detained there. Also, counting casulaties in the wake of Hurricane Michael: after Hurricanes Harvey and Maria, why the numbers don’t seem to add up. Plus, the week in politics with the Texas Tribune and much more. No matter where you are, it’s Texas Standard time.

Texas Standard: September 26, 2018

The Texas Attorney General is now getting involved in a court fight over whether Texas school children should be required to say the pledge of allegiance, we’ll explore the implications. Also, should toothless inmates in Texas be provided dentures? Right now, many are not. We’ll take a look at the policy some say needs to change. And something that may be in your garage or shed right now could be contributing to the decline in the bee population. We’ll take a look. Plus, speaking of bees, we’ll get the goods on honey. What is it exactly? We’ll hear from our insect expert. Plus, tracking especially high rates of asthma in Dallas. All that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 25, 2018

Proposed changes to legal immigration here in the U.S. that would especially affect the poor. We’ll take a look at the possible impacts. Plus, President Trump has signed the largest VA budget ever. What the money is going towards and where it’s coming from. And we’ll head to Sonora, Texas where unprecedented flooding has damaged hundreds of homes. Also we’ll hear how Texas waterways when not causing the damage like in that city, can provide access to parts of the state that are otherwise off-limits. Plus why Mexico’s new president-elect could change the messaging on birth control, and why Laredo city officials have found themselves in a tough position when it comes to next steps for a border wall. All those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 14, 2018

The Harvey effect: as Florence bears down on the Carolinas, meteorologists say theres an shift in how major hurricanes are doing damage, we’ll have the latest. Also, Walmart bets big on high end out door gear, but some brands are telling Walmart to take a hike, we’ll hear why. And remember smokin in the boys room, or girls room? Nowadays its vaping in the classroom, for real. Texas teachers trying to get students to kick the habit amid calls for a federal crackdown on the marketing of vape pens. Plus the police chief leading the charge to make Corsicana the Hollywood of Texas, and it appears to be working. All that and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 30, 2018

The state department denying US passports to American citizens born near the border. The accusation: fraudulent birth certificates. We’ll talk to the Washington post reporter who found that the citizenship of hundreds, possibly thousands of hispanics with American birth certificates are being stripped of their passports, and their legal status in the US thrown into question. We’ll hear the how and why. Also, Harvey trapped hundreds of thousands of Texans when major freeways flooded across Houston. Now the effort to fix what’s causing clogged arteries during storms. And smart enough to set up a smart home? A new industry emerges to help. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 22, 2018

Texas plastic bag bans get sacked in a unanimous ruling by the Texas Supreme Court. We’ll take a look at the ruling, the reasoning and the impact. And: Warehousing migrants is big business, and right now business is good for those companies. Manny Fernandez of The New York Times joins us. Plus: The president’s proposed a sixth military branch, the space force. Though its not quite ready for liftoff. Science fiction or defense necessity? Those stories and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 30, 2018

Through hail and high water, communities in Texas stand again because the weather is NOT gonna keep us down. Join me for a virtual tour. We’ll hit Refugio, Port Arthur, Austin and even Washington DC. Plus, the bombs that destroyed the facade of racial harmony: we’ll tell you more. And who exactly is Ronny Jackson? And can he manage a 200 billion dollar budget? Also oil, cattle-ranching, big hair and Cadillacs. Nothing better than a good soap opera! Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: December 27, 2017

Trips to Israel by Texas officials are costing taxpayers. Is it worth it? We’ll explore. Also we’ll take a look at the longstanding economic ties between Texas, and oil! Plus while all eyes have been on the North Pole the last few days we turn our attention to the South Pole. We’ll hear from a couple who spent time there for research on a future journey to Mars. And if you’ve got a poinsettia in the house, check the leaves. We’ll tell you why. And we’ll look to commentator WF Strong for some predictions for Texas not in 2018… but in 2118. Those stories and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 4, 2017

Over 95 percent of Houston is now dry, says the mayor- as the city issues new mandatory evacuation orders. The latest today on the Texas Standard.

Last night the 4th largest city in the nation started cutting power to some residents trying to get them to leave their homes. We’ll hear what officials are concerned about even as the city dries out.

In Victoria–as people try to return home, many are greeted by eviction notices? The Harvey-hit working poor at a tipping point.

You’ve navigated the floodwaters: can you navigate the process to get help?

Plus: a decision on DACA? Reading, writing and the rural retention of teachers and a whole lot more.

Texas Standard: August 31, 2017

As waters recede, the death toll rises in the aftermath of Harvey- and fears grow of more grim discoveries. Today, from the gulf coast, this is the Texas Standard.

Coming up, the latest on rescue and recovery efforts in the states largest metropolitan area, plus, explosions reported at a flooded-out chemical plant northeast of Houston.

As the biggest rainstorm in the history of the US mainland makes it way well beyond our borders, Governor Abbott announces the worst is not over for southeast Texas.

Also, an important ruling on the eve of the so-called sanctuary city bill.

We’re live from the Galveston County Daily News. And no matter where you are, It’s Texas Standard time.

Texas Standard: August 30, 2017

Roadsigns down, trees uprooted, power and food in short supply- but on the horizon, unmistakable signs of hope. The road to recovery, today on the Texas Standard

As Tropical Storm Harvey moves northeast dumping torrential rain on the golden triangle and the Texas / Louisiana border, recovery eforts kick into gear further south. Today we’re broadcasting live from the Corpus Christi area – where Harvey first made landfall a few miles north of us: destruction so severe, there’s still a curfew in place.
We’ll hear how the area’s trying to move forward…and what’s still needed.

Also, a warning on filing insurance claims and why “500 year” floods are more frequent than the name suggests.
We’re live from the coastal bend and it’s Texas Standard time.

Texas Standard: August 28, 2017

The official forecast was spot on: an unprecedented event and beyond anything experienced. How Texas is weathering Harvey. It started out with staggering winds making landfall north of Corpus Christi, the view from near Rockport described as apocalyptic. No longer a hurricane, Harvey unleashed its fury further north, plunging the third largest metropolitan area into a flood of historic dimensions. We’ll have the latest today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: December 7, 2016

Not since 1787 has the US had a constitutional convention. Now, what was once considered the unthinkable looks possible. The story today on the Texas Standard

The problems of prognostication. Politics: you’re not alone. We’ll look at forecasting through an unlikely lens.

Also a new Texas rule to require burial of fetal remains–for those seeking an abortion, what this means as a practical matter.

They’re calling it the flooding capitol of the nation. It’s also set to become the third largest city in the US. As development continues, can a flood czar help? Or is it too late?