Elizabeth McQueen

Pause/Play Season 5 Trailer

The new season of Pause/Play starts on April 17th. This season is all about change. We’ll be looking at the impact that climate change, changes in laws, changes in ticketing, changes in venues, changes in tech, and more are having on the Austin music scene.

All About Our Listeners

All About the Census

In the latest episode, Peter Schwarz from Sound Music Cities about some of the results of the Greater Austin Music Census. You’ll also hear from Jonathan “Chaka” Mahone about why some Black community leaders didn’t feel included in the census.

Why doesn’t commercial music in the U.S. get any financial support outside of, say, fans?

Austin is home to a thriving music scene, but that scene hasn’t received much financial support outside of fans buying music and going to shows. That’s not uncommon in the U.S. While some art forms like the opera and the symphony get regular public and private investments, commercial music typically gets left to fend for itself. Why is that?

In the first episode of Season 4 of Pause/Play, Hosts Miles Bloxson and Elizabeth McQueen try to answer that question with the help of UT Professor Charles Carson.  They also examine the idea that the best music comes from struggle. And they explore what the city of Austin owes the music scene, and how the city might better support the for-profit music sector.

Charles Carson, an associate professor of music at the University of Texas at Austin, is pictured on campus on Oct. 18, 2022, in Austin. Michael Minasi / KUT News

NFTs and Music: Minting an NFT

Miles and Elizabeth go on a journey to mint an NFT. But in order to do that they have to write and record a song, buy cryptocurrency, set up a wallet, and list an NFT for sale. But things don’t quite go as they planned.

What Mayor Adler has to say about the Live Music Fund

Hear what Austin Mayor Steve Adler has to say about the history of the Live Music Fund, why he raised concerns about the Live Music Fund Event Program, and what he thinks should guide the conversation moving forward.

Musician pay for live shows in Austin hasn’t changed in 40 years. Here are some other ways they’ve found to make money with music.

Austin musicians are making the same amount of money per gig as they did in 1979. In the latest episode, we look at gig pay through the years and talk to musicians Greg Clifford and Beto Martinez about how they’ve found ways to make money from music that don’t involve playing live.

Drummer Greg Clifford is pictured in his home where he produces lo-fi music on Feb. 8, 2022, in Austin. Michael Minasi/KUTX

Musician and producer Beto Martinez is pictured in his home studio on Feb. 9, 2022, in Austin. Michael Minasi/KUTX

 

Live music doesn’t always pay the bills. So what else can you do?

In this episode, you’ll learn how much money the average Austin musician makes per gig, and why it can be hard to make a living playing live music.

Then you’ll learn all about an alternate revenue stream for musicians — sync licensing. Nathalie Phan, founder of SoundSync Music, will explain the ins and outs of sync licensing from an agent’s perspective and Austin rapper Tee-Double will walk you through the artist’s perspective.

During Nathalie’s segment you’ll hear the song “Black Tea” by Slug, Elijah Fox, Soul Food Horns and Yasper.

During Tee-Double’s segment you’ll hear “Caped Up” from his album Local Transplant.

Nathalie Phan is pictured in her home on Jan. 31, 2022, in South Austin. Michael Minasi/KUT

 

Hip-hop artist Tee-Double is pictured in his home studio on July 15, 2021, in Austin. Michael Minasi/KUTX

 

Could affordable housing save Austin’s music scene?

In the latest episode, you’ll learn how Austin non-profit Foundation Communities helped musician James Shelton find affordable housing the central Austin. And you’ll get a crash course in how affordable housing works from Foundation Communities Executive Director, Walter Moreau.

Walter Moreau of Foundation Communities is pictured on Jan. 12, 2022, outside of Bluebonnet Studios. Michael Minasi/KUTX

Read “The Artist Loft: Affordable Housing (for White People)” from the Atlantic

Read “The Rise of WhiteSegregated
Subsidized Housing
” from The Institute on Metropolitan Opportunity at the Minnesota School of Law.