economy

Texas Standard: December 27, 2021

As COVID-19 cases soar in Texas, we look at where Texas stands in the pandemic fight and what more we can do in the holiday season. Texas health experts weigh in on what’s happening with the rapid spread of the Omicron COVID-19 variant. Also what 2021 tells us about 2022 when it comes to Texas’ role as the world’s energy capitol. And inflation putting a pinch on many households. How much is this like the crisis of the 70’s? Perhaps less than one might think. Economist Ray Perryman weighs in. Plus the modern-day revival of an underground comics classic, one with a distinctly Texas accent. The freak Brothers backstory and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: December 15, 2021

With the window now closed for names to go on the primary ballot for statewide races in 2022, what are we learning about the state of Texas politics? We’ll take a look. Other stories we’re covering, in a state with more military bases than any other except California: active duty service members reach big deadline for covid vaccinations. Also some state’s call it junk science, but in Texas courts it can be called admissible evidence. We’ll have more on the history of what’s called forensic hypnosis. And many Texans in mourning this week over death of a man who was more than a soaring tenor but a cultural icon as well. Remembering Vicente Fernández and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 4, 2021

Demands for the ousting of a non-partisan county elections official for failing to be sufficiently Republican? Donald Trump took Hood County by 81%, but local Republicans want the election official there fired. We’ll hear why some think this could be a microcosm of Texas politics at the moment. Also with so much growth among Latinos in Texas according to the last census, where are they in the new redistricting maps? And recent viral images of border agents rounding up black migrants on horseback and the reverberations of racial violence in Texas. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 10, 2021

The Democrats have voter engagement strategies lined up ahead of the 2022 elections. But do they have a candidate for the top of the ticket? We’ll take a look. Also, Governor Greg Abbott has banned private businesses from requiring so-called “vaccine passports”. But can he do that? And what can businesses do? We’ll explore. And Texans rely heavily on groundwater resources. Would President Biden’s infrastructure plan really address concerns about its sustainability? Plus, you may by now have heard about Amazon Sidewalk. But what do you do about it? We ask our go-to tech expert. And prices are up on a whole lot of things. What’s behind the increase and is it permanent? Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 30, 2021

As the Texas Senate votes to force power generators to better prepare for weather extremes, new insights on what Texans actually want. A new University of Houston hobby school survey on the impact of the February freeze and power outages, and how Texans want the system to change. Also more on an 8 billion dollar plan being pitched to Texas lawmakers that promises a 7 day power backup in the event of future emergencies. And as vaccines are rolled out in Texas prisons, a new report card on how well lockups and juvenile facilities in Texas have tracked the spread of COVID-19. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 25, 2021

Once again, Texas in the spotlight as the nations attention turns to immigration and the thousands of undocumented minors coming across the southern border. Where to house them for how long and under what conditions? We’ll hear the latest from Dallas where a convention center has been converted into makeshift housing. Also, voter fraud prosecutions in Texas and a pattern of targeting people of color at disproportionate rates. And a major gulf coast energy project being shelved after much fanfare. All of those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 11, 2021

Texas Governor Greg Abbott was once Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott. What would the AG think of the Governor?? We’ll explore. Also, the stimulus package and how big Texans and little Texans could benefit from it. Plus ERCOT and the gray area in which it operates. It’s a non-profit but it looks like, works like and functions like a government agency. So why not comply with open records requests? And Twitter is 15 now and 15 year old girls in Texas should have a quinceañera. So we are throwing Twitter one. But we’re also asking is it time to start acting like a grown up? Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: February 19, 2021

Getting power back? Priceless. Losing power and heat and water and basic services? What price the winter storm of 2021? Coming up, the high price of being unprepared. Economist Ray Perryman on the difficulty calculating the impact of this week’s storm. Also, who should shoulder the costs of weatherizing power plants? According to the governor, it’s the taxpayer. We’ll hear more. And with power coming back and a lot of water damage its not too soon think about your own next steps: tips for talking to the insurance company, and a massive rescue of fellow Texas residents… But where do you shelter almost 5 thousand sea turtles? Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: February 12, 2021

It’s freezing out there. We’ll get a look at weather conditions across the state and what’s to come. We’ll also check in on how the state is weathering extended economic challenges posed by COVID-19. We’ll hear from the state’s top budget official. And the energy industry plays a part in that economic outlook. New proposals aim to tax some polluting practices. Plus a lesson in Texas border history that you might not be familiar with. And we’ll also wrap up the week in Texas politics and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: February 11, 2021

The second impeachment trial of Donald Trump is underway. So what have we learned and will any of it affect the chances of a conviction? We’ll explore. Also, the COVID-19 vaccine could put an end to this pandemic in the way we’ve been living it so far, but only if people get the vaccine. We’ll explore some challenges. And Mexico doesn’t get the credit it deserves when it comes to the way it’s shaped the global economy. That’s the premise behind a new book. What we could stand to learn about our neighbor to the south. And the growing backlog of unsolved murders in Texas and what it tells us about policing in the state. Plus we’ll take a break and nerd out a bit about gaming graphics. All that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 4, 2021

A Texas senator joins almost 11 colleagues in a pledge not to certify the electoral college results. Political theatre or something more? We’ll explore. Also, demand at food banks has doubled since the pandemic. What happens now with cuts to a critical fresh food program? How the pandemic has accelerated the widening of the gap between rich and poor. Also a federal crackdown on the marketing of CBD and what it might mean for Texas. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 1, 2021

It promises to be a new year like few others, if any in Texas history. What’s on the docket as state lawmakers get back to work at the capitol? This much seems certain: it’ll be a legislative session like few others in modern Texas history. From budget shortfalls, to an ongoing fight against a COVID-19 and political redistricting, much is at stake in the 87th lege. Coming up, we’ll talk to the person who’s been doing the numbers about where we stand financially. Also, the possibility of whether changes in drug laws in other states will spark change in Texas. And transparency of government during a pandemic. These stories and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: December 29, 2020

As many anticipate the start of the New Year, many Texas public school officials fear what the stroke of midnight might mean for them. A hold harmless guarantee for Texas public schools expected to expire on December 31st. For districts facing a drop off in attendance, will there be enough money to maintain operations? Also, racial disparities in the pandemic spark a rethink of who’s most at risk to COVID-19. We’ll also look at concerns about social isolation and seasonal affective disorder. And with the launch of a U.S. Space Force, plans to find a home for the U.S. space command. Could it be landing in Texas? Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Guacamole Chalupa With Beans, Please

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a widespread economic impact. Many small businesses have had to close their doors. This Typewriter Rodeo poem remembers one.

Texas Standard: December 1, 2020

A downturn in travel. Layoffs in the energy industry, struggling small businesses, what’s it all add up to? Comptroller Glenn Hegar delivers some grim news about the Texas budget to lawmakers. But there’s a bit of a surprise, too: the news is not as bad as some feared. We’ll talk with him. Also, the after effects of COVID-19: could they linger even after the pandemic has passed? What known and isn’t about longer term health effects. And decades after they took off from Texas bases during WWII, the women with silver wings get overdue recognition…their story and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 11, 2020

A prescription for Coronavirus relief? Congress hasn’t come up with it, and there’s a major political price that could be paid in Texas, too. Less than two months till election day and the message from constituents: we need relief from the economic effects of the pandemic. Politicians on both sides of the aisle say they get it, so where’s the relief package? We’ll explore. Also what’s in a name: the push to identify heatwaves as we do hurricanes. And American gothic reimagined in a Texas of today. The week in politics with the Texas Tribune and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 9, 2020

As many Texans struggle to make ends meet in a pandemic, politicians debate what sort of relief to offer. We’ll talk with Senator John Cornyn. Also, among the biggest cities in the US, residents of Houston appear to be facing the toughest challenges when it comes to personal finance and health. We’ll have details from a new survey by NPR and Harvard. Plus the politics of medicine amid a pandemic, how college campuses are trying to curb the spread amid rising COVID-19 numbers, the Fed changes its position on curbing inflation, what that might mean from most everyday folks and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 5, 2020

After first asking for an extension to complete the census count, a sudden u-turn. The impact on Texas could last for a decade or more, we’ll have details. Also, more women are unemployed now than at any time since the late 1940’s, and women of color are among the hardest hit. What some are calling America’s first female recession, and what’s behind it. And residents along the gulf coast finding more effective ways to deal with an active hurricane season amid a pandemic. Plus a claim that 1 in 3 texans can’t access health insurance. A Politifact check and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 21, 2020

A sweeping stay at home order in Hidalgo county to stop the spread of COVID-19. But Governor Abbott says there’s no enforcement mechanism. In the Rio Grande Valley, doctors say resources are so limited they’re at the point of making difficult treatment choices. We’ll talk to the health authority in Starr county. Also, a state prison inmate surrounded by fellow inmates testing positive for COVID-19 is approved for parole but dies before his release. As his daughter grieves, she’s also demanding changes to the system. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 29, 2020

The U.S. Supreme Court upholds an important decision in a case concerning access to abortions, closely watched in the Lone Star State. We’ll have the latest. Also, amid a pandemic, the start of early voting statewide in primary runoff elections. What’s been called a dry run for November. And a second look at a string of police shootings in Houston that predate the killing of George Floyd, and what they could mean for the future of police transparency. Plus Texas researchers develop a sensor to distinguish between symptoms of the flu and COVID-19. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard: