economy

What a banking slowdown in Texas means for the economy

The relationship between U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas and Dallas billionaire Harlan Crow is under scrutiny after a ProPublica investigation reporting that Thomas accepted lavish vacations and more from the GOP donor.

The Texas House has passed a sweeping budget that reveals a lot about support for some key issues including school vouchers, gun-related crimes and more.

And the Texas Standard’s Sean Saldana with what a new survey of bankers tells us about the state of Texas’ economy.

What’s in the Texas House budget

The opioid fentanyl has become a scourge for many communities. But where is it coming from? New court filings shed light on the fentanyl supply chain. We’ll tell you where it comes from, and how it’s being smuggled into Texas.

The Texas economy just keeps growing. How does this keep happening, and when will it ever stop?

What if Shakespeare was from the Valley? We kind of have an answer. We’ll hear from the professors who compiled pieces from writer’s who’ve reimagined some of the playwright’s works by setting them along the border.

Plus the latest on the Legislature, the Typewriter Rodeo, and breaking news from across the state.

Pumped: Food, fuel and the future of Texas – A Texas Standard special

We don’t think of gas stations much, yet they are fixtures across Texas, and tell us a lot about who we are and where we’re going. There are more than 11,000 of them scattered across the state – along major highways and tiny backroads alike, they fuel up long haul trucks, hungry commuters and sometimes whole communities.

In some ways, the gas station is the backbone of our economy and the center of conversation and community. In other ways, they’re a blight on the landscape and, many feel, a soon-to-be anachronism. “Pumped: Food, fuel and the future of Texas” is an exploration of an often-overlooked staple of our life.

How Ro-Tel became a staple of Texas cooking

Lawmakers at the Capitol are considering changes to how Texas handles bail. The push would give judges more leeway to deny bail for violent offenses – and Democrats may have a considerable say in what happens.

More fallout from this month’s ice storm: why the Texas capital city may be looking for a new city manager soon.

Amid concerns about rising prices, layoffs and more, the Dallas Fed weighs in with a forecast on the Texas economy.

And why a can of diced tomatoes – you know the one – has such a rabid Texas following.

Plan to prevent the next blackout heads to the Legislature

Historic job growth, but how sustainable? Economist Ray Perryman weighs in on the latest numbers.

As lawmakers prepare for bruising legislative battles ahead, one thing some Texas Republicans and Democrats agree on? Dislike of a new proposal to prevent future statewide power grid blackouts.

Watch your wallets online: our go-to tech expert Omar Gallaga with the latest on data breaches.

And high hopes in some quarters for changes to Texas cannabis laws.

In Texas, you can be forced to sell your condo

Eight months after the school shooting in Uvalde, Democratic state Sen. Roland Gutierrez announces a package of gun safety reforms. Will Texas Republicans take it up?

A decades-old Texas is law forcing some condo owners to leave their homes.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the first lab-grown meat product for human consumption. But will consumers bite?

After conquering the hearts of many a Texan, Willie Nelson and Family take Sundance.

And a PolitiFact check of President Biden over whether wages are keeping up with inflation.

Native Austinite Gabriel Luna on ‘The Last of Us’

One year after an attack on a synagogue in north Texas: an appeal to fellow Texans to step up the fight against antisemitism. We’ll have details. Other stories we’re tracking: with a record surplus, a legislative wishlist from leaders of higher ed in Texas. And which comes first, chicken or eggs? Inflation forcing some tough choices for many Texans as grocery prices scramble home budgets. Also dry January? Or just drier than usual? Some considerations for those resolving to abstain from alcohol in the new year. And a post apocalyptic video game transformed into a TV series. Actor Gabriel Luna on the show’s ties to Texas as well as his own plus much more today on the Texas Standard:

How Austin is bringing healthcare to people experiencing homelessness

That light at the end of the tunnel, is it a sign that a rail strike can be averted or a freight train headed for the U.S. economy? With an economy already reeling from a multitude of challenges, president Biden gets the wheels rolling in congress to head off a potential nationwide rail strike. We’ll look at the potential impact for Texas and the prospects that a strike can be avoided. Also one of the last fully independent public institutions of higher learning set to join the UT system. What does Stephen F. Austin State University stand to gain or lose in the process? Also a closer look at the Texas economic forecast and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Las Jefecitas: using comida to sustain immigrant households.

Many immigrants have leveraged the delicious cuisines of their países as a means of income and work when they first arrive in the United States. Even before setting up a taco truck or even a brick and mortar, we see vendedoras earning their income by selling tacos out of their hieleritas in grocery store parking lots or wherever they know they’ll find foot traffic. In this episode we explore what motivates these women to leave their kitchens and go out into these parking lots. We discuss these informal economies and how they look in today’s digital age. We also spend time at La Mujer Obrera and Cafe Mayapán to see how the organization supports immigrant and indigenous women by training and employing them.

Texas Standard: September 28, 2022

In Florida, as flood warnings go out ahead of hurricane landfall, echoes of Texas’ Hurricane Harvey. The managing editor of space city weather with a live update on Hurricane Ian and parallels to a catastrophic storms in Houston. Also after relatively upbeat reports on Texas’ economy, is the Dallas fed changing its tune? Plus an update on the trial of the mass shooter accused in the attack on an El Paso Walmart. And non-profits taking a new tack to encourage Texas farmers to use less water. Plus a Politifact check of a claim about democrats objecting to presidential election outcomes. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 15, 2022

A major logistics catastrophe avoided. We’ll talk about the railroad worker strike that wasn’t. Railroad worker unions were prepared to go on strike without a contract that had better protections for sick time. We’ll have the latest on the deal that’s kept the trains on the tracks. Plus you’ve heard of blue books, the green book, but what about the beige book? It’s choc full of the economy’s secrets, and our own Sean Saldana’s been looking through a copy. And a major bridge project in Corpus Christi has produced major headaches. We’ll tell you why. That and the biggest headlines of the day, today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 08, 2022

One of the world’s top vaccine experts takes on questions as a new COVID-19 booster arrives in Texas; we’ll be talking with Dr. Peter Hotez about the new Omicron focused vaccines. Other stories we’re tracking: with pandemic disruptions, gun violence and other concerns, how some Texas school districts are trying to address students’ mental health. Plus, a longtime liberal activist who worked alongside Anne Richards talks about a life in Texas politics and the future of the causes she fought for. These stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 30, 2022

As a debate grows over whether or not the US is in a recession, where does Texas stand, and where’s the state’s economy headed? After the economic downturn of 2008, many people pointed to the resiliency of the Lone Star State as the Texas Miracle. But the current economic picture has many wondering about the toll on Texas and what it means going forward. We’ll talk with an economist at the Dallas Fed. Also after the Dobbs decision, why some LGBTQ couples across Texas are making plans to defend same sex marriage. And it survived two wars but will it survive a move tomorrow through the Houston ship channel? The future of the Battleship Texas. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 3, 2022

The city and people of El paso paying tribute to the 23 lives lost in a racially motivated mass shooting three years ago today. As El Pasoans come together to honor and remember victims of the August 3rd 2019 mass shooting, the accused shooter remains in jail and has yet to go to trial. Julian Aguilar of the Texas Newsroom with the latest. Also, in a part of Texas were democrats have long won election after election, republican fundraising efforts suggest a major shift. And almost 5 years after hurricane Harvey, how Houston and how the lives of those affected have changed. Plus a Politifact check and much more today on the Texas Standard:

The Great Resignation

The pandemic changed life as it once was. Many lost jobs. Others began remote work. Everyone took stock of what was most important. Even two years in, we’re not seeing a workforce that’s back to “normal.” That was the inspiration for this Typewriter Rodeo poem.

Texas Standard: June 6, 2022

When it comes to curbing mass shootings some experts say in Texas, politics is the problem. Or is it? As a familiar pattern among politicians emerges in the aftermath of the mass shooting in Uvalde, the democratic nominee for Lt. Governor says there’s the prospect for serious change. Our conversation with Mike Collier. Also gas prices hit a new all time record in Texas. Any prospects for relief? Industry analysts Matt Smith with the latest. And in the depths of space: is one potential solution to climate change “out there”? A Texas researcher exploring what she sees as some very real possibilities. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 8, 2022

A Houston native and American basketball icon arrested and detained in Russia. What can the U.S. do to secure her release? We’ll have more on WNBA star Brittney Griner and concerns she’s being held as a political prisoner in Russia as western pressure over Ukraine swells. Also, decades after NASA’s big move to Texas, economist Ray Perryman sizes up the space industry’s multi-billion dollar trajectory. And the Rolling Pines Fire reconsidered: a report on what caused the most recent big fire near Bastrop, and what it could mean long term. And the case for the face of the new right in Texas. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: February 28, 2022

It’s being called Ukraine’s Alamo; a moment that has underscored the country’s spirit of resistance and has inspired more sanctions against Russia and demonstrations across the west. Also, the latest on Russia’s invasion of Ukraine and why energy has been largely left off the table amid rising sanctions. Plus, with Texas primary elections tomorrow, the once mostly-obscure county officials who now find themselves in the spotlight. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: February 9, 2022

As more teachers quit, those who remain are taking on more students and more responsibilities; a survey suggests a new Texas public school crisis in the making. Also, efforts to ban certain books from school libraries and how what’s been happening in Hood County may be a harbinger of what’s ahead. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 24, 2022

Austin has ’em, so does San Antonio–now, almost five years after Hurricane Harvey, Harris County officials are looking into massive underground tunnels to help with flooding. Also, why Texas is one of only four states where employment numbers have bounced back to pre-pandemic levels. And, Austin-based author on her new book exploring the Mexican American experience in Texas. Those stories and more, today on the Texas Standard: