Women

How Ro-Tel became a staple of Texas cooking

Lawmakers at the Capitol are considering changes to how Texas handles bail. The push would give judges more leeway to deny bail for violent offenses – and Democrats may have a considerable say in what happens.

More fallout from this month’s ice storm: why the Texas capital city may be looking for a new city manager soon.

Amid concerns about rising prices, layoffs and more, the Dallas Fed weighs in with a forecast on the Texas economy.

And why a can of diced tomatoes – you know the one – has such a rabid Texas following.

How Austin has changed

Last night’s State of the Union touched on immigration, inflation, gun violence and other issues. Richard Pineda of the University of Texas at El Paso joins us with analysis of the annual message by the president to Congress.

A legal challenge to an abortion drug and a possible decision from a federal judge in Amarillo that could come as early as this week, with potential implications nationwide.

Wage gains for migrants filling jobs in the U.S. and why a visa program for seasonal workers may not be working for U.S. employers.

And author Lawrence Wright on the astonishing transformation of the Texas capital city.

Big Bend National Park to add thousands of acres of parkland

Tridemic? One of the world leading virologists says its more like a Septademic. Dr. Peter Hotez joins us and talks about staying healthy during the holidays. Also as the humanitarian crisis on the border grows Governor Abbott is calling for an investigation of some of the non-profits helping migrants. We’ll explain. Plus, Google is making some changes that affect the results that show up in your searches including those shopping ads. Our go to tech expert Omar Gallaga takes us behind the curtains. And Big Bend National Park is about to get a little bigger with new areas to explore. All that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Largest teacher prep program in Texas at risk of losing accreditation

A long awaited report on Maternal Mortality in Texas is now two months delayed and may not be available for the next legislative session. We’ll have the latest. Other stories we’re tracking: amid a statewide teacher shortage, the biggest teacher accreditation program in Texas now facing the possible loss of accreditation. We’ll hear more. And after several local ordinances to decriminalize marijuana pass on the November ballot, a pushback from many local officials. Also a singer from El Paso who’s new release, Frontera, is turning a spotlight on latino voices in country music. Our conversation with Valerie Ponzio, the week in Texas politics with the Texas Tribune and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Demand for mental health care continues to soar

Psychologists are seeing a surge in demand for mental health treatment. How can they meet a growing need? 60% of the nation’s psychologists are too busy to take on new patients. We’ll tell you how they’re trying to meet the post-pandemic demand. Plus there’s a runoff in Austin’s mayoral election. We’ll hear from both candidates on why they should lead the capital city, starting today with Kirk Watson. And we’ll go back in time in south Texas, when Vaqueros roped and ranged through the desert scrub. All that plus a World Cup update and the latest headlines today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 18, 2022

Iranian made drones rain fire on Ukraines capitol of Kyiv, we’ll look at the significance and long term implications. Coming up a Texas A&M expert takes a closer look at Russia’s new round of drone attacks and the potential for further escalation in Ukraine. Also, Houston, we have a problem: a new report says several of the city’s suburbs are sinking. We’ll hear why and what can be done to stop it. And disinformation in Spanish speaking media sparks a demand from a coalition of Latino organizations is asking social media platforms to intervene. Plus seeking sterilization in a post Roe Texas. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Las Jefecitas: using comida to sustain immigrant households.

Many immigrants have leveraged the delicious cuisines of their países as a means of income and work when they first arrive in the United States. Even before setting up a taco truck or even a brick and mortar, we see vendedoras earning their income by selling tacos out of their hieleritas in grocery store parking lots or wherever they know they’ll find foot traffic. In this episode we explore what motivates these women to leave their kitchens and go out into these parking lots. We discuss these informal economies and how they look in today’s digital age. We also spend time at La Mujer Obrera and Cafe Mayapán to see how the organization supports immigrant and indigenous women by training and employing them.

Texas Standard: October 10, 2022

Protests by parents in Uvalde and a major shakeup in security for schools there. Uvalde suspends all activities for its school police unit with workers reassigned, placed on leave or resigning. DPS has been asked to help with school security. We’ll have the latest on continued fallout from the mass shooting at Robb Elementary in May. Also after dipping a bit, gas prices rising once more. Our go to energy expert on what behind pump prices and some of the larger ripple effects as well. And the Texas author calling for a healthier vision for boys and masculinity moreover. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 5, 2022

Monkeypox declared a public health emergency nationwide. We’ll talk with the state epidemiologist about what Texans need to know. Other stories we’re covering: after the Dobbs decision, more than 100 military installations in states where abortion is now banned. What this means for service members seeking abortion care. And as temps hover in the triple digits across much of Texas, the new season of a podcast examines whether the power grid can stand the strain. Mose Buchele, host of the disconnect, joins us. And a Texas based band garnering international attention for its Texas-themed tales of a “Bummer Year”. A conversation with the frontman of the band Good Looks and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 26, 2022

The House Committee Report on the school shooting in Uvalde and what may be conspicuous omissions. Jim Henson of the Texas Politics Projects says a closer inspection of the House report on Uvalde may be revealing about the intersection between the investigation and politics as usual. We’ll hear more. Also what’s behind a low-key review of votes from 2020 in Tarrant County? And the Feds open a civil rights investigation into Houston’s response to complaints about illegal dumping. Plus will abortion restrictions translate into more young Texans turning out at the polls this November? Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 25, 2022

An immigration decision from the supreme court with a big impact on Texas…though it might not be the last word on the matter. We’ll have more on the decision. Also, how extreme heat is affecting migrants trying to get around border checkpoints on foot and what’s being done for their safety. And why gas prices in Texas are going down. These stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 18, 2022

Systemic failures and poor decision-making cited in a damning report on the Uvalde school shooting. More on the Texas House committee’s 77 page report released this weekend. Also, Texas Democrats gather in Dallas; what’s the game plan for November? And more on record-setting heat expected all week in the Lone Star State. These stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 15, 2022

The state of Texas is suing the Biden administration over abortion guidance to hospitals. The federal rules instruct emergency room doctors to provide abortion services in emergency conditions. Texas’ own law provides exceptions for the health of the pregnant patient. So why is the state suing? Also, the state terminating its guardianship over scores of young runaways once in the care of child protective services. What happens to those young people? Other stories include the Austinite who many believe invented psychedelic rock. Plus the week in politics and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 27, 2022

Did the Dobbs decision revive longstanding but dormant Pre-Roe anti-abortion laws on the books in Texas? Also, the impact of the SCOTUS opinion on the state’s sex education, the disproportionate impact of anti-abortion laws on disabled persons, and the specter of other rights being toppled raised by the Thomas concurrence. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 16, 2022

In the wake of the Uvalde shooting, state lawmakers talking more money for mental health resources and for law enforcement, we’ll have the latest. Other stories we’re tracking: a widely expected reversal of Roe vs Wade. Sergio Martínez-Beltrán of the Texas Newsroom with a closer look at changes to Texas abortion laws over the last decade. And the water’s back on in Odessa, but don’t drink it just yet. How a city of more than a hundred thousand has coped without water during days of blistering temperatures. And this week’s election results from South Texas that have political observers here (and way beyond) buzzing big time. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 16, 2022

Early voting starts today in the primary runoff elections. What you need to know about what’s on the ballot, and voting by mail. Also, one of the highest-profile races on the Republican ballot is for Attorney General. Incumbent Ken Paxton was considered vulnerable, but will current Land Commissioner George P. Bush be able to defeat him? And language in Texas’ recent abortion legislation has some doctors and pharmacists concerned about providing care for miscarriages. We’ll take a look at why. Also take a closer look at the Texas electric grid and why hot temperatures have so far been a challenge. Plus a conversation with a Texas researcher involved in that new photo of a black hole. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 11, 2022

What happened to more than a billion dollars in federal COVID-19 relief funds for Texas? Officials want to know whether the money was misspent. Were COVID-19 relief funds used to defray the costs of the governor’s border crackdown? That story plus, how nominally non-partisan school board elections in Texas became a magnet for big money donations, and what that could mean for what’s taught in public school classrooms. Also higher ed in Texas prisons: a new report outlines big gender disparities in opportunity. And the work of the code inspector, and why it often isn’t working to help many apartment renters. Plus a Politifact check on SB8 and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 9, 2022

Texans overwhelming approved two constitutional amendments promising some tax relief. So what happens now? We’ll take a look. We’ll also dive deep into one Dallas neighborhood for some understanding of the challenges facing lower-income renters everywhere. And the head of the state’s juvenile justice department resigned just over a week ago. Why the timing has some advocates worried. Plus eyes are on an annual celebration in Russia this year, we’ll have what a Texas-based expert is watching for. And Lockhart, Texas is synonymous with BBQ, but it’s a veggie-growing enterprise there that’s caught our attention. We took a trip to find out why what’s going on there is so cutting edge. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 11, 2022

A woman charged with murder in Texas after an alleged self induced abortion has been released, but that’s far from the end of the story. Many fear the arrest and murder charge in Starr County could be a harbinger of what’s to come amid a rise in abortion restrictions and an expected ruling from the United States Supreme Court. We’ll hear more. Also the hype over hemp: what new data says about the legalization of the hemp industry in Texas and whether it has turned out to be as big an economic boon as advocates had hoped. And the race to save the stories behind a musical movement: reclaiming and preserving San Antonio’s Westside sound. All of that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 4, 2022

The Biden administration is set to end a Trump era policy aimed at keeping migrants out of the US due to pandemic concerns. Also, what’s the difference between Greg Abbott and Beto O’Rourke? According to a new survey of potential Texas voters: about 2 points; the research director of the Texas Lyceum Poll on the Governor Abbott’s slim lead. And Richard Linklater on his new film celebrating growing up in Texas during the space age. These stories and more today on the Texas Standard: