Texas Tribune

Why is Texas launching its own stock exchange?

Finance titans BlackRock and Citadel Securities are teaming with investors to raise $120 million to open the Texas Stock Exchange. The group still has some regulatory hurdles to clear before opening but plans to start listing stocks for sale as early as 2026.
On its fourth try, SpaceX achieved a breakthrough for its Starship rocket with a successful return to earth. But not all those gathered to witness the event from Boca Chica got what they were hoping for. The Standard’s Kristen Cabrera reports.
As more tourists flock to the remote West Texas town of Terlingua, bringing money and development, some locals are concerned the town’s running dry.
And: In the Big Bend-area town of Alpine, recovery efforts are underway after a fire destroyed a historic building in a central part of town.

Why is Ted Cruz proposing a bill to legislate in vitro fertilization?

There’s infighting among Texas Republicans over the next steps in their efforts to stop abortions in the state.
Canada is Texas’s second-biggest international trade partner, behind Mexico. We’re talking to Mary Ng, Canada’s minister of export, trade and economic development, during her visit to the Lone Star State this week.
After the Alabama Supreme Court ruled that frozen embryos are considered children under state law, Democrats raced to pass bills to protect in vitro fertilization. Now, U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz is pushing a similar bill – but what exactly would it do?
Ahead of Memorial Day on Monday, we’ll hear from a Texas family still working to make sure the legacy of their beloved serviceman is honored.
And: Today marks two years since the deadly shooting at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde. A survivor’s story.

Four dead after severe storms batter Houston, East Texas

Deadly and destructive storms sweep across downtown Houston, killing four and leaving hundreds of thousands without power. We’ll have an update on the latest as damage assessment and recovery efforts are underway.
A new controversy surrounding Houston Superintendent Mike Miles is getting the attention of state lawmakers and the Texas Education Agency – this one involving an apparent transfer of Texas education dollars to charter schools in Colorado.
Plus: the week in politics with Matthew Watkins of The Texas Tribune.

Historic church site in South Texas recognized as stop on Underground Railroad

A Galveston County judge has pushed back the start of a trial in a civil lawsuit against the parents of the accused gunman in the Santa Fe High School shooting, which left eight students and two teachers dead in 2018.
Houston has a new acting police chief in the wake of the abrupt retirement of Chief Troy Finner. We’ll have the latest.
The Jackson Ranch Church in the Rio Grande Valleyis being recognized as a stop on the Underground Railroad ushering enslaved people to freedom in Mexico.
Plus: A group of Gen Z rappers go on a road trip across Texas in the new film “Lost Soulz.”

The latest on the bird flu outbreak among dairy cows

Storms continue to wreak havoc with flooding in some places north of Houston, the worst they’ve seen since Hurricane Harvey.

A preview of a big election tomorrow to fill a seat that hasn’t been vacant since the early 80’s.

Efforts to curb property taxes. How well’s that actually going?

The United Methodist Church does a 180 on LGBTQ clergy. We’ll talk with the Bishop of the Rio Texas Conference.

A big night for Dallas sports fans on more than one front. We’ll hear why and what’s at stake.

Do’s and don’ts for Cinco de Mayo.

Plus the week in politics with the Texas Tribune.

What you need to know about upcoming spring elections

Get ready to cast your ballots. Local elections are scheduled in Texas for May 4, with early voting beginning on Monday. Katya Ehresman, voting rights coordinator at Common Cause Texas, gives us the lowdown.
What a trial run of a four-day workweek in the UK tells us about how well such a shift might work.
Don Louis, a Texan who once hoped to score big in the NFL, has moved the goalposts – now aiming for the country music charts.
Plus: The week in politics with the Texas Tribune.

The move away from fossil fuels may exacerbate water scarcity in South Texas

Corpus Christi at the intersection of a clash between dueling demands – one for water, another for energy alternatives.
Dallas City Council votes to expand historical preservation efforts, with a specific outreach to communities of color.
If you’re looking for an apartment in Texas, do you know what you’ll really be paying each month? A warning to renters about the rise of so-called junk fees.
A Houston print shop, long popular with musicians, now the center of a labor dispute. Raul Alonzo with that, plus the week in politics with the Texas Tribune and much more.

What ‘Cowboy Carter’ says about Blackness, Beyoncé and country music

Questions are still swirling around the deal cut with Attorney General Ken Paxton over securities fraud charges, with prosecutors pointing fingers – at each other. Investigative reporter Lauren McGaughy of The Texas Newsroom has the latest.
As Texans prepare for a once-in-a-lifetime moment, why some say viewing Monday’s total eclipse could make you a better person.
Beyoncé’s exploration of country music in “Cowboy Carter” has sparked conversations about genre stereotypes and cultural boundaries.
Plus: the week in politics with The Texas Tribune.

‘Flamin’ Hot’ shares the spicy story of a snack food phenomenon

Legislation on the governor’s desk known as the “Death Star” bill takes aim at local ordinances statewide. Will cities strike back?

In a place known for years of drought, heavy rain has forced evacuations in Amarillo and Hereford.

We’ll meet Houston’s Benchawan Jabthong Painter, winner of the James Beard Award for best Texas chef. Her secret recipe? Cooking with grandma in Thailand.

The new movie “Flamin’ Hot” tells the story of a janitor at Frito-Lay who set the snack world on fire. We’ll talk to the film’s director, Corpus Christi native Eva Longoria, and stars Jesse Garcia and Annie Gonzalez.

Plus the week in politics with the Texas Tribune.

Is there such a thing as climate-friendly beef?

Two high-profile Texas attorneys have been tapped to lead the case against Attorney General Ken Paxton in his Senate impeachment trial. Lauren McGaughy of the Dallas Morning News joins us with more about the legal top guns brought in by the Texas House.

A disagreement over property taxes between Gov. Greg Abbott and Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick may point to a much wider rift among Texas Republicans. USA Today’s John Moritz explains.

The USDA green-lights so-called climate-friendly beef. But when grilled about it, the lack of answers raises questions of whether it’s mostly marketing sizzle.

Also, James Barragán of the Texas Tribune with the week in politics.

What we know about the mass shooting at an Allen outlet mall

Another Texas community is reeling after a mass shooting that killed eight people, this time at an outlet mall in Allen, outside of Dallas.

Following local elections across the state, we’ll have reports on some closely watched propositions in San Antonio, El Paso and Austin.

Fort Hood in Central Texas is formally set to be renamed Fort Cavazos for the nation’s first Hispanic four-star general. Hispanic and Latino civil rights groups are applauding the move but looking for more substantive change.

And the the University of Texas at Austin is getting a new school of civic leadership – but some questions are being raised by some students and faculty.

Performers pay tribute to Willie Nelson for his 90th birthday

A push in the state Legislature to end countywide voting on Election Day. Nearly 100 counties in Texas allow voters to cast their Election Day ballots anywhere in the county. But now a move to require voters to cast their ballots in specific district locations. Why the push, and why it matters.

The Veterans Administration is looking into a new application for artificial intelligence: suicide prevention.

An oil tanker bound for Houston seized by Iran. What this move may signal.

And country music luminaries pool their talents for an album to celebrate the 90th birthday of the Red Headed Stranger Willie Nelson.

What’s in San Antonio’s ‘justice charter’?

Yes and no signs proliferate in San Antonio over Prop A. What’s behind the city’s so-called justice charter?

In Kyle, a corrections officer indicted in the shooting death of a person awaiting trial, and a family’s struggle to find answers.

Taking the STAAR tests online. Should there still be a paper option?

A push for more transitional housing for Muslim’s recently released from incarceration.

The story of a world premiere in Dallas for one of the most downloaded poets in the U.S.

And the week in politics with the Texas Tribune.

What a banking slowdown in Texas means for the economy

The relationship between U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas and Dallas billionaire Harlan Crow is under scrutiny after a ProPublica investigation reporting that Thomas accepted lavish vacations and more from the GOP donor.

The Texas House has passed a sweeping budget that reveals a lot about support for some key issues including school vouchers, gun-related crimes and more.

And the Texas Standard’s Sean Saldana with what a new survey of bankers tells us about the state of Texas’ economy.

Will Texas ban the death penalty for people with severe mental illness?

Thirty million people now call Texas home, but new numbers tell a story of uneven growth across the Lone Star State. Which areas are gaining and which are slipping as the Texas population continues to grow?

The Texas Standard’s Sean Saldana has details on a push to outlaw the death penalty for those with severe mental illness

The rising cost of living in Texas is hitting tacos, too. But what’s with a $5 difference just five blocks away? Likely more than meets the mouth, says taco journalist Mando Rayo.

Plus the week in politics with the Texas Tribune and the Typewriter Rodeo.

What’s in the Texas House budget

The opioid fentanyl has become a scourge for many communities. But where is it coming from? New court filings shed light on the fentanyl supply chain. We’ll tell you where it comes from, and how it’s being smuggled into Texas.

The Texas economy just keeps growing. How does this keep happening, and when will it ever stop?

What if Shakespeare was from the Valley? We kind of have an answer. We’ll hear from the professors who compiled pieces from writer’s who’ve reimagined some of the playwright’s works by setting them along the border.

Plus the latest on the Legislature, the Typewriter Rodeo, and breaking news from across the state.

This West Texas town has been under a boil-water notice for nearly 5 years

State lawmakers heard hours of testimony on a bill that would restrict gender-affirming care for minors. Senate Bill 14 wouldn’t just end access to gender-affirming care for young Texans, it would also revoke the medical license of any doctor who provides it.

How Texas’ first family of oil and gas both regulates and profits from the energy industry.

And in far West Texas, the community of Toyah is dealing with a boil-water notice that seems like it will never end.

Ideas for combatting the trucking shortage

Five men are handed over in Mexico along with a letter purportedly from the Gulf Cartel apologizing for the “senseless crime” of violently kidnapping four Americans, leaving two of them and one Mexican dead. U.S. officials say the apology seems authentic, though perhaps not sincere.

What’s being done to combat the nation’s shortage of truck drivers.

A sneak peek at the start of SXSW Film as the festival kicks off in Austin.

And the week in politics with the Texas Tribune.

Texas outlawed red-light cameras years ago – but this town still has them

As a deadline approaches for bills to be filed in the Texas Legislature, proposals on guns and secession are making headlines. There is rare bipartisan support building around a proposal that proponents say would boost the effectiveness of background checks for buying a firearm, a move prompted by the school shooting in Uvalde.

When it comes to property tax relief, are Texas Republicans a house divided? There is a possible battle looming between the Texas House and Senate.

And the last red-light cameras still giving out tickets in Texas – and the push to switch them off for good.

Fans turn out in Frisco as U.S. wins SheBelieves Cup

On the one-year anniversary of Russia’s war with Ukraine, Valerie Hudson, international affairs expert at Texas A&M, shares a Texas perspective on where the conflict stands today.

Author and commentator David Frum on concerns about moves being made by Mexico’s president that could turn back the clock on democratic change there – and the implications for Texas and beyond.

The Texas Standard’s Sarah Asch reports from the SheBelieves Cup soccer tournament in Frisco, where the U.S. Women’s National Team
took home the title.

Plus the week in politics with the Texas Tribune.