Texas Tribune

Texas Standard: February 12, 2021

It’s freezing out there. We’ll get a look at weather conditions across the state and what’s to come. We’ll also check in on how the state is weathering extended economic challenges posed by COVID-19. We’ll hear from the state’s top budget official. And the energy industry plays a part in that economic outlook. New proposals aim to tax some polluting practices. Plus a lesson in Texas border history that you might not be familiar with. And we’ll also wrap up the week in Texas politics and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: February 4, 2021

Beto for senate, Beto for President…now Beto for governor? What may be shaping into a high profile challenge to governor Greg Abbott. Evan smith, CEO of the Texas Tribune on the possibility of an Abbott vs Beto battle for the top office in Texas. Also not all vaccine rollouts in Texas are created equal. Just ask the folks in Amarillo where there’s no online signup, and people from other states are coming to get vaccinated. We’ll have a revealing picture from the panhandle. And amid jokes about coping with the isolation of pandemic, no laughing matter for people struggling with substance use. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 8, 2021

Will prominent Texas politicians who sided with unsubstantiated election fraud claims pay a price for that position after Wednesday? And what is a coup? It’s a question many Americans are asking about and arguing over after the invasion of the capitol. We’ll talk with a Texas scholar whose focus includes authoritarian regimes. And she’s one of the few health providers for miles around in a rural part of east Texas. And right now she’s overwhelmed with demand for vaccinations, we’ll talk with her. Also the impact of the pandemic on the future of Texas public schools, the week in Texas politics and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 13, 2020

As COVID-19 continues to tear through El Paso, an appellate judge lifts shutdown orders and more Texans pin their hopes on news about a vaccine. With hopes building around word of a covid vaccine said to be 90 percent effective, what’s next? A closer look at next steps and a realistic timetable. Also, not Biden his time: concession or no, the president elect must move forward with assembling a new administration and cabinet. Any Lone Stars set to make the short list? And in a season like no other, can the homecoming mum, and the many businesses built up around the tradition survive 2020? Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 5, 2020

According to a survey of Texans interested in the news, a majority say they now have grave questions about the usefulness of polling. We’ll try to get some questions answered. Also, is there a speaker in the house? Very soon there’ll be a new one. Ross Ramsey of the Texas Tribune on the growing line of lawmakers seeking the top job in Texas’ lower chamber. And anti-social media? The role of Twitter, Facebook and the rest in the information wars leading up to the election. And as COVID cases spike again in parts of Texas, a would-be hero emerges from the Alamo city: a virus killing robot. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 29, 2020

Early voting numbers in Texas have been high. Texas still leading in the raw numbers of youth turnout. But what’ll that mean come ballot counting time? We’ll explore. Plus, what’s going on at Texas Juvenile detention centers? A new complaint indicates some big concerns. We’ll have the details. And 5G is coming. You’ve probably heard it means faster speeds, but will it, really? And staying at home to watch your favorite scary movie is a pandemic-friendly option this Halloween. We’ll examine why The Texas Chainsaw Massacre might be the top choice in many homes across the state. All of that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 23, 2020

News of the first FDA-approved COVID-19 treatment comes at a time when cases in Texas are starting to spike. We’ll explore the details and what’s next. And: Did you get a chance to watch the presidential debate last night? What are your thoughts? We’ll have a recap. Also: A new documentary about the life of Horton Foote who won an Oscar for his screenplay adaptation of “To Kill a Mockingbird”. Plus: The week in Texas politics with our friends from The Texas Tribune and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 16, 2020

As Coronavirus cases tick upwards again in Texas, some schools are returning to laptops and tablets. But others are going the opposite direction. Coming up our conversations with the superintendents of two Texas school districts where back to school is the rule, despite concerns about an uptick in Coronavirus cases. We’ll hear the rationale. Also you’ve heard of the great recession. Now the spotlight turns to what Texas researchers are calling the economic “she-session” of 2020. Plus the week in Texas politics with the Texas Tribune and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 25, 2020

Setting the stage for the next legislative session, Governor Abbott proposes new sanctions he says aimed at shoring up police. We’ll hear more on what battles appear to loom for lawmakers: from Coronavirus cutbacks to issues surrounding policing and protests. Also a Texan brews up a beer proclaiming Black is Beautiful. And its going down better than even he expected. And with the announcement of a Supreme Court nominee imminent, judicial philosophy and gender politics. Plus the week that was with the Texas Tribune and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 16, 2020

Despite less money and name recognition than the incumbent, some think MJ Hegar has a strong chance of making political history in November. Many political analysts think air force veteran and teacher M.J. Hegar has the best chance of reclaiming a seat in the US senate for Texas democrats for the first time in two decades. Also what losing a newspaper means for a Texas town, a teachers’ struggle to wear a Black Lives Matter mask at school, and 80 million unrequested ballots sent to voters? A Politifact check of that claim by the president and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 11, 2020

A prescription for Coronavirus relief? Congress hasn’t come up with it, and there’s a major political price that could be paid in Texas, too. Less than two months till election day and the message from constituents: we need relief from the economic effects of the pandemic. Politicians on both sides of the aisle say they get it, so where’s the relief package? We’ll explore. Also what’s in a name: the push to identify heatwaves as we do hurricanes. And American gothic reimagined in a Texas of today. The week in politics with the Texas Tribune and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 28, 2020

On the day after Hurricane Laura’s assault on the northern gulf cost of Texas, what’s the view from local hospitals already dealing with a pandemic? We’ll have more on the aftermath of Hurricane Laura. Also, it’s a wrap for the Republicans as they close their 4 day convention. We’ll explore whether the message moved the needle in what many consider to be a more politically competitive Texas. And concerns about a looming eviction crisis, we’ll have details. Also border smuggling and the demand for bologna, the week that was in Texas politics and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 21, 2020

The party’s party’s over – now what? After the national convention, how do Texas democrats plan to seize on the momentum? A closer look today – our conversation with the head of the Texas democratic party on next steps in the run up to November. Plus, a Declaration of Independence for women in US politics. Also, a big arrest involving an effort to build a private border wall in South Texas – what’s known and what isn’t. A new batch of listener questions about COVID-19, a look back at the week in politics with the Texas Tribune and much more when the Texas Standard gets underway.

Texas Standard: August 14, 2020

A new bill coming before Texas lawmakers next year addresses police action and accountability. It’s called the George Floyd Act, we’ll have the latest. Also, a Texas federal prison has more COVID-19 positive inmates than any other facility in the country. What’s being done about it. And what are you still wondering about the Coronavirus? We put your questions to a doctor. Plus, what Kamala Harris said about Texas in this election season before she became the VP nominee. And 50 years later… why it’s still worth remembering a long-gone Austin music venue. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 7, 2020

With under three months until election day, the Biden campaign getting pressure to pull out the stops in Texas to seize an historic moment, we’ll have the latest. Also, face to face with an interface: in an era of zoom meetings, Child Protective Services takes family visits online. And presidential rhetoric reconsidered. The Texan author of Demagogue for President makes the case that some of it is genius. Plus listeners have more questions about COVID-19. Dr. Fred Campbell of UT Health San Antonio has answers. Plus the week in politics from the Texas Tribune and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 31, 2020

Ready for the new school year? School administrators across the Lone Star State say wait a minute. We’ll explore. Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton offers guidance but, it’s not enough. What school administrators are asking for. Could local police academies be scrapped? Are they a natural place to trim city budgets? We check in with one of Texas’ top police academy experts. What Title 42 Expulsions mean, our report from Mexico City. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 17, 2020

For many school districts: competing mandates from state leaders and local health officials leaving teachers parents and kids in limbo. Our conversation with superintendent of EL Paso ISD on the practical challenges of reopening public schools. Also, more on a newly unveiled proposal to cut 130 million dollars from state health services as the Coronavirus fight continues. And 5 years after the death of Sandra Bland, the mark she left at her alma mater, and on a movement. Plus the week in politics with the Texas Tribune and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 29, 2020

The U.S. Supreme Court upholds an important decision in a case concerning access to abortions, closely watched in the Lone Star State. We’ll have the latest. Also, amid a pandemic, the start of early voting statewide in primary runoff elections. What’s been called a dry run for November. And a second look at a string of police shootings in Houston that predate the killing of George Floyd, and what they could mean for the future of police transparency. Plus Texas researchers develop a sensor to distinguish between symptoms of the flu and COVID-19. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 24, 2020

Are you ready to get back to normal? Attitudes in Texans on a planned return to business as usual or something closer to it. A new UT Texas Tribune poll on how Texans are feeling about efforts to curb the impact of the Coronavirus. Also, how the school lockdown is playing out on the other side of students’ laptops. And the week in Texas politics with the Texas Tribune and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 10, 2020

The powers that be: how Lone Star State lawmakers are coming down on a resolution to limit the president’s use of the military against Iran, we’ll have details. Also, lots of private property blocking further border wall construction, but the Trump administration has found a way around it, and it’s making conservationists upset. John Burnett previews his upcoming story for NPR. Also, how smart is a smart home if it can’t help you conserve? A house in Junction Texas that may become a new model for the future. Plus the week that was in Texas politics with the Texas Tribune and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard: