texas

Voters in Texas have elected their first slate of property appraisal board members

A former Texas oil exec is being punished for allegedly raising the price of oil. Is it the tip of the iceberg or water under the bridge?
In spring elections across larger Texas counties, voters got a more direct say in who runs the obscure agencies that oversee the property appraisal process – agencies that determine how much you pay in property taxes.
The promise of solar panels seems bright, but some companies are getting some heat for misrepresentation. What you need to know.
New Mexico has a booming recreational marijuana industry thanks in part to some Texans making the trip. Will laws change on this side of the border?
Plus the most beautiful spot in Texas? Some point to a place out west that’s a bit off the beaten path.

Are unlicensed teachers affecting student performance in Texas?

After the worst-ever wildfire disaster for Texas agriculture, there’s now an effort to help ranchers who lost large numbers of pregnant cows.
A year after the mall shooting in Allen, what the data reveals about gun violence there more broadly.
A new report documents how unlicensed teachers are becoming fixtures in many Texas schools.
Organizers of the Texas Eclipse Festival in Burnet County are now offering partial refunds to attendees because the event ended a day early.
Also, just how smart is artificial intelligence getting? Commentator W.F. Strong tried a little experiment.

An AI Experiment

There’s been a lot of talk lately about artificial intelligence — what it can do and what its limitations are. And if you’ve been keeping tabs on it at all, there’s no doubt that it seems to be getting better — and fast.

Texas Standard commentator WF Strong wanted to find out for himself just how good its become. So he did a little experiment.

The latest on the bird flu outbreak among dairy cows

Storms continue to wreak havoc with flooding in some places north of Houston, the worst they’ve seen since Hurricane Harvey.

A preview of a big election tomorrow to fill a seat that hasn’t been vacant since the early 80’s.

Efforts to curb property taxes. How well’s that actually going?

The United Methodist Church does a 180 on LGBTQ clergy. We’ll talk with the Bishop of the Rio Texas Conference.

A big night for Dallas sports fans on more than one front. We’ll hear why and what’s at stake.

Do’s and don’ts for Cinco de Mayo.

Plus the week in politics with the Texas Tribune.

What does Drake’s A.I. Diss Song Mean for Rap?

Fresh defends Drake’s “Taylor Made Freestyle,” which uses dupes of Snoop and Tupac’s voices. Plus hear Confucius’ take on the University of Texas’ response to a recent pro-Palestinian protest along with other headlines, and Hip-Hop Facts.

The Future of Work in Texas – A Texas Standard special

Texas is changing, and so is the world. If we squint to try to look at the future job landscape, what do we see? There are more than 15 million working Texans right now, but while the state boasts steady growth and “record high levels” for jobs and the labor force, there are always unknowns on the horizon.
Among them: tech advancements and the impacts of climate change. So how will the jobs of tomorrow look different? We’re exploring all that and more today in The Future of Work in Texas.

The move away from fossil fuels may exacerbate water scarcity in South Texas

Corpus Christi at the intersection of a clash between dueling demands – one for water, another for energy alternatives.
Dallas City Council votes to expand historical preservation efforts, with a specific outreach to communities of color.
If you’re looking for an apartment in Texas, do you know what you’ll really be paying each month? A warning to renters about the rise of so-called junk fees.
A Houston print shop, long popular with musicians, now the center of a labor dispute. Raul Alonzo with that, plus the week in politics with the Texas Tribune and much more.

Counting Cattle With the Fathers

Longtime listeners may know — Texas Standard is fast approaching a milestone birthday. We’re turning 10 next March. With us almost from the beginning have been signature segments including the Typewriter Rodeo and Stories From Texas — these bi-weekly commentaries from WF Strong. He says he has a goal beyond entertainment.

Revisiting the exploits of a notorious Texas jewel thief

As Texas eclipse watchers bask in the afterglow, we’re checking in on one event that was forced to end festivities early due to inclement weather.
A quarterly report offers a look at the health of Texas’ oil and gas industry. Energy analyst Matt Smith breaks it down.
The new book “The King of Diamonds” by Rena Pederson follows the trail of an elusive jewel thief who made off with millions by slipping into the homes of Dallas’ wealthiest residents.
Sea turtle nesting season is underway on South Padre Island. How many hatchlings are expected this year?
Plus: We’ll delve into the benefits of couples sleeping separately.

Texas Extra: More from Bill Nye on the total solar eclipse

“Science Guy” Bill Nye has been beloved by children for generations. He was so kind and generous in a recent interview with the Standard focused on the upcoming total solar eclipse. He also answered a question about why he has been making headlines with his thoughts on climate change. This extended version also includes an introduction with personal stories about both of Nye’s parents.

What ‘Cowboy Carter’ says about Blackness, Beyoncé and country music

Questions are still swirling around the deal cut with Attorney General Ken Paxton over securities fraud charges, with prosecutors pointing fingers – at each other. Investigative reporter Lauren McGaughy of The Texas Newsroom has the latest.
As Texans prepare for a once-in-a-lifetime moment, why some say viewing Monday’s total eclipse could make you a better person.
Beyoncé’s exploration of country music in “Cowboy Carter” has sparked conversations about genre stereotypes and cultural boundaries.
Plus: the week in politics with The Texas Tribune.

With the eclipse days away, this small city is more prepared than most

A plan will cap co-pays for state subsidized child care – how much of a difference will it make in stemming a childcare crisis?
On Wednesday, a federal appeals court heard the latest arguments over SB 4, Texas’ controversial new immigration enforcement law. In the meantime, where does the legal back-and-forth leave migrants?
Ennis, a North Texas town that attracts 100,000 visitors each April to see its bluebonnets, has an extra draw for tourists this year: It’s in the eclipse’s path of totality.
And: Why the Judd Foundation, named for Marfa’s most famous modern artist, is taking on Kim Kardashian in court.

Bill Nye the Science Guy is coming to Texas for the eclipse

Dade Phelan’s fight to hang on to his Beaumont-based seat is seen as a proxy war for fights over the future direction of Texas Republicans. We’ll hear about how his fellow GOP opponents are seizing on an issue they think can topple the current House speaker.
The issue that is rapidly turning bipartisan: Both Republicans and Democrats are calling for solutions to a housing crisis in Texas.
Bill Nye the Science Guy is coming to Texas for the total eclipse and shares his top tips for experiencing the event.

From small startups to fossil fuel giants, Texans are rethinking the future of energy

What’s the connection between credit card fees and Texas? It’s a question at the heart of a case that could affect consumers nationwide.
In Texas’ energy mix, gas and oil are giving way to more and more alternate sources: think wind, solar and small-scale nuclear – and many of the projects are run by veterans of the fossil fuel industry.
Corpus Christi is making plans to deal with a lack of drinking water, but some locals are pushing back against one potential solution.
Also: North Texas is making plans to host World Cup games, but they’re racing against the clock.

Inside the international friendly match between El Paso Locomotive FC and Juárez FC

Looking back at the week in politics with The Texas Tribune, from Gov. Greg Abbott calling for college students to be disciplined over anti-Semitic speech to a Texas congressman under investigation by the House ethics committee.
Red flags have been raised over group homes for Texans with intellectual disabilities.
For the first time last week, El Paso Locomotive FC and Juárez FC faced off in front of a sold-out crowd. Texas Standard intern Alan Tiscareno shares more from the international friendly match.
And: Texas music legend Alejandro Escovedo ties together a lifetime of songs in his new album.

An Indigenous perspective on the solar eclipse from a traditional healer

In a long-running securities fraud case against Ken Paxton, a deal has been reached that will let the attorney general avoid trial or an admission of guilt.
The U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral arguments today in what could be the most important case on reproductive rights since the Dobbs decision, this time on access to medication abortion.
Autonomous vehicles are getting a lot of bad press. Could smart roads pave the way to self-driving cars and trucks? A smart highway in Texas may put that to the test.
Marika Alvarado, who describes herself as a “direct descendant of generations of Medicine Women: traditional native healers of body, midwives and plant medicine,” shares her Indigenous perspective on the solar eclipse.
And: A UT San Antonio professor has dubbed the upcoming eclipse “the most profitable 22 minutes in Texas history.” Bulent Temel joins the show with more.

Introducing Rhizome, Laredo’s unique art project and community collaboration

The Texas Medical Board has offered a wide definition of emergency medical exemptions to the state’s strict ban on abortion.
Health care is also at the center of a massive cyberattack that’s been crippling insurance payments, but consumer information is very likely involved.
Police high-speed chases can be extremely dangerous for the general public, not just the vehicles involved. What we’ve learned in a deep dive into the data for North Texas chases.
The price at the pump has been going up again and global uncertainties could affect that further.
And we’ll take a trip to Laredo to explore Rhizome, a community art project, and hear from artist Crystal Wagner.

House Speaker Dade Phelan has drawn an opponent

The Justice Department has filed an antitrust lawsuit against Apple, alleging that the maker of the iPhone violated antitrust law by maintaining an illegal monopoly in the smartphone market. We’ll hear more from Jason Snell, one of the nation’s top Apple watchers.
House Speaker Dade Phelan faces another challenge: not just re-election in his home district, but now a rival for his leadership position from state Rep. Tom Oliverson.
An update on the Standard’s Music Madness bracket, and how you can make your picks for the Elite Eight.
Plus: The week in politics with The Texas Tribune.