Teacher

Are unlicensed teachers affecting student performance in Texas?

After the worst-ever wildfire disaster for Texas agriculture, there’s now an effort to help ranchers who lost large numbers of pregnant cows.
A year after the mall shooting in Allen, what the data reveals about gun violence there more broadly.
A new report documents how unlicensed teachers are becoming fixtures in many Texas schools.
Organizers of the Texas Eclipse Festival in Burnet County are now offering partial refunds to attendees because the event ended a day early.
Also, just how smart is artificial intelligence getting? Commentator W.F. Strong tried a little experiment.

From small startups to fossil fuel giants, Texans are rethinking the future of energy

What’s the connection between credit card fees and Texas? It’s a question at the heart of a case that could affect consumers nationwide.
In Texas’ energy mix, gas and oil are giving way to more and more alternate sources: think wind, solar and small-scale nuclear – and many of the projects are run by veterans of the fossil fuel industry.
Corpus Christi is making plans to deal with a lack of drinking water, but some locals are pushing back against one potential solution.
Also: North Texas is making plans to host World Cup games, but they’re racing against the clock.

The Rio Grande is getting saltier. What’s that mean for agriculture?

The U.S. Supreme Court will weigh in on SB4, the controversial Texas law that allows state and local police to arrest and prosecute migrants who enter the state, after delaying implementation of the law last week.
A lack of medical insurance and access to treatment is making life in rural Texas tougher than many might imagine.
Energy insider Matt Smith has the latest on rising gas prices as many Texans hit the road for Spring Break.
The Rio Grande, the body of water that outlines the border between Texas and Mexico, is becoming saltier – affecting people, farmland and livestock on both sides of the border.
And: Amid a statewide teacher shortage, one Central Texas school district is trying to turn things around by creating its own pipeline of new recruits.

Texas frackers are going electric – but can the grid handle it?

With a push from Texas Republicans, the U.S. House moves a step closer toward a vote to impeach the head of Homeland Security.

Amid a shortage of teachers statewide, a move in Dallas to get more men of color in the classroom.

In the Texas oilfields, how a push for greener drilling has some worried about the effects on the power grid.

A browser update for the ages? Why new features in Google Chrome have one tech writer warning of the end of the human internet.

And Temu takeover? Why U.S. giants like Amazon and Walmart are rethinking their strategies as a China-based retailer turns up the heat.

What’s behind the massive oil spill in the Gulf?

An oil spill in the Gulf is considered to be among the worst in U.S. history. After two weeks, why is it getting so little attention?

We’ll hear about an unintended impediment to the growth of electric vehicle manufacturing in the U.S.

After a political fight over a school voucher-like program, salary bumps for Texas teachers are off the table. Why some teachers say they’re OK with that.

Also: What’s behind Mark Cuban’s sale of the Dallas Mavericks, and what could it mean?

Public school teachers in Texas are protesting vouchers. They’ve enlisted plumbers to help.

A federal judge strikes down a redistricting map in Galveston County, saying it violated the rights of Black and Latino voters, and gives the county until Oct. 20 to fix its maps.

Public school teachers plan to travel to Austin to fight a plan to use taxpayer money to pay for private tuition. Who’ll teach the students when the teachers are gone? You might be surprised.

As Texas’ population swells, so does empty office space. We’ll dig into what that signals.

And: We continue our month of Tracking Texas Cryptids with the spooky story of La Lechuza.

Suburban school districts revolt against ‘recapture’ funding

What does Ron DeSantis really want from Texas? Jeremy Wallace of the Houston Chronicle weighs in on the GOP presidential candidate’s curious Texas tour.

Two North Texas school districts, Keller and Carroll, take steps to challenge one of the lynchpins of state education funding: revenue recapture.

What the auto strike means for the evolution to electric vehicles.

Fantastic Fest, a terrifying film festival that’s the biggest of its kind in the world, is back for its 18th year in Austin.

And we’ll meet the youngest reporter to cover Ken Paxton’s impeachment trial.

The bipartisan appeal of psychedelic research into treating veteran PTSD

With a big election season looming, Texas withdraws from a national tool designed to prevent voter fraud.

Texas wants to regulate carbon storage on its own. Now two Texas congressmen are pushing to prevent that.

Inflation cooling, good news for many Texas workers but potentially a double edged sword.

With many teachers leaving the profession, a small Texas district sets up its own pipeline for getting new teachers into classrooms.

And a Texas Republican part of a bipartisan attempt to loosen drug restrictions?

Kate the Chemist aims to answer ‘the big questions’ about science with new podcast

Erin Douglas of the Texas Tribune joins with details on water infrastructure efforts that have bipartisan support, but a chasm separating House and Senate proposals – and just 11 more days to come to agreement.

More money for Texas public school teachers? Some educators say the proposals on the table aren’t enough to keep them in the classroom.

In San Antonio, what appears to be a first-of-its-kind effort to dramatically improve access to public bathrooms for people with disabilities.

And UT-Austin chemistry professor Kate Biberdorf – aka Kate the Chemist – shares a preview of her new podcast, “Seeking a Scientist.”

Largest teacher prep program in Texas at risk of losing accreditation

A long awaited report on Maternal Mortality in Texas is now two months delayed and may not be available for the next legislative session. We’ll have the latest. Other stories we’re tracking: amid a statewide teacher shortage, the biggest teacher accreditation program in Texas now facing the possible loss of accreditation. We’ll hear more. And after several local ordinances to decriminalize marijuana pass on the November ballot, a pushback from many local officials. Also a singer from El Paso who’s new release, Frontera, is turning a spotlight on latino voices in country music. Our conversation with Valerie Ponzio, the week in Texas politics with the Texas Tribune and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 16, 2022

With an expected split in power on Capitol Hill, what does that mean for Texans? Coming up, the Texas Tribune’s Matthew Choi on bills that could affect Texas in a big way, and the potential for gridlock In Congress. Also, after the winter power disaster of 2021, Texas officials rolling out a plan to help one of the most vulnerable groups of Texans: dialysis patients. And for the first time since the end of the Apollo program, NASA takes a giant leap to the moon. More on today’s launch of Artemis 1 and what’s ahead. And with interest rates rising and turbulence in the housing market, the Dallas fed raises red flags. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 15, 2022

Citing what he calls widespread problems, Governor Abbott calls for an investigation into the midterm vote in Harris County. The Texas governor says allegations of improprieties on election day in Harris county include claims of insufficient paper ballots in Republican precincts. Taylor Goldenstein of the Houston Chronicle joins us with details. Also a Dallas Morning News investigation into an app designed to alert authorities to suspicious behavior and curb school shootings. Is it working? We’ll take a closer look. And after the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan, more refugees settled in Texas than any other state. How those refugees are trying to help thousands left behind. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 14, 2022

Seldom has mental health been a bigger part of the public conversation in TX, but how much of a priority for state lawmakers? We’ll take a closer look. Also after a record high number of more than 375,000 teachers in Texas last year, this year, 12% left the profession. We’ll have more on a crisis of retention and recruitment in teaching. And education in prison and the implications for the long term in Texas. Plus Cop27: what the climate summit means for the energy capitol of the world. And at the intersection of an ever evolving Texas culture and the kitchen: 100 recipes. We’ll meet the authors of the Big Texas Cookbook and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 2, 2022

What exactly happened during law enforcement’s response to the school shooting in Uvalde? We’ll look at what newly obtained recordings reveal. More than 5 months after the Uvalde school shooting, the Texas Tribune and Propublica obtain 911 calls and communications between police and dispatchers showing the scale of miscommunication in law enforcement’s response. Also with just 6 days til midterms, how Harris county has become ground zero over concerns about election monitors. And in a state that is mostly wet when it comes to alcohol, booze back on the ballot in some parts. The how, the why and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Overburdened Teachers

The school year is now well underway. Routines are set. If things seem to be moving smoothly, we have teachers to thank. That was the inspiration for this Typewriter Rodeo poem.

Texas Standard: September 23, 2022

With record numbers of detentions at the border, where do we stand with immigration enforcement? We’ll have the head of Customs and Border protection today. Also with fewer than 50 days until statewide elections, today the second interview in our look at the Agriculture Commissioner’s race. Yesterday it was the democratic challenger. Today, our conversation with incumbent republican Sid Miller. Also details of a new survey of Texans on gun regulations and, in the wake of Uvalde, the psychological impact on parents, teachers and students. Plus concerns about a shortage of certified teachers in the classroom, the week that was in Texas politics and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 31, 2022

18 months after a deadly statewide electricity blackout, state officials adopt new weather preparedness standards. But is it enough? We’ll look at what the new rules are and whether they have the teeth to prevent future events like the 2021 Winter Blackouts. Also, El Paso’s DA under fire and facing a petition seeking her removal. But she calls it a political move. Plus drug cartels in Mexico shifting production to an unusually lethal synthetic opioid that has health officials in the U.S. concerned about an overdose crisis. Those stories, a Politifact check on teacher salaries and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 26, 2022

A Texas gun restriction for 18 to 20 year olds ruled unconstitutional. This, just 3 months after a young gunman’s deadly attack on a school in Uvalde. A judge in Fort Worth rules that Texas can’t ban 18 to 20 year olds from carrying handguns. We’ll hear more about what’s behind the decision and what comes next. Also beyond debt forgiveness: what can be done to bring down the cost of higher ed in the first place? And amid a water shortage in the Valley, one community moving to reclaim water for the future. Also a teacher shortage today, a crisis for the future? Plus the week in politics with the Texas Tribune and more today on the Texas Standard: