Teacher

Texas Standard: December 7, 2020

Front line workers in Texas get to get COVID-19 vaccines but educators and staff are demanding a better place in in the vaccination line. We’ll have details. Plus as Texas lawmakers get ready to start a new session, both republicans and democrats prepare to take on issues of voter fraud and voter access. Also, powering up: with a new administration in Washington, what’s set to change for the energy capitol of the U.S.? And billions of federal dollars for pandemic relief and time’s running out for Texas to spend it all. Where’s the money going? Plus listener questions about COVID-19 and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 16, 2020

Despite less money and name recognition than the incumbent, some think MJ Hegar has a strong chance of making political history in November. Many political analysts think air force veteran and teacher M.J. Hegar has the best chance of reclaiming a seat in the US senate for Texas democrats for the first time in two decades. Also what losing a newspaper means for a Texas town, a teachers’ struggle to wear a Black Lives Matter mask at school, and 80 million unrequested ballots sent to voters? A Politifact check of that claim by the president and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 22, 2020

The state’s largest school district has plans to start the year online and could extend that a little more. Houston ISD’s interim superintendent joins us to talk about the weight of planning this school year. We’ll also hear from teachers who are frankly afraid for themselves and their families, but also love being in the classroom. And a Texas law expert joins us to parse out exactly what’s going on with federal agents arresting people in Portland. Plus a harrowing story about COVID-19 and Texas ICE detention centers. That and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 30, 2020

A plea to Governor Abbott as COVID-19 cases set new records in Texas: do more to curb the spread, or let us take steps to do it. A return to stay at home orders? That’s one thing leaders in Travis county are asking for the power to enforce, as hospitalization rates in and around the Texas capitol city approach 70 percent. Also the pandemic sparks extended food benefits for millions of Texas kids. And though the current plan is for many Texas schools to reopen in the fall, many teachers may not be in the classroom. We’ll hear why plus a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Homeschooling

Most Texas students are finishing the 2019-2020 school year online — at least as much as possible. That was the inspiration for this Typewriter Rodeo poem.

Texas Standard: April 24, 2020

Are you ready to get back to normal? Attitudes in Texans on a planned return to business as usual or something closer to it. A new UT Texas Tribune poll on how Texans are feeling about efforts to curb the impact of the Coronavirus. Also, how the school lockdown is playing out on the other side of students’ laptops. And the week in Texas politics with the Texas Tribune and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Higher Ed: For Some Teachers “It’s Not A Matter Of Being Nice But Setting Great Expectations”

Just about everybody can recall an influential teacher who nurtured and inspired them. But not all great teachers are “warm and fuzzy.” In this episode of KUT’s podcast “Higher Ed,” Southwestern University President Dr. Ed Burger and KUT’s Jennifer Stayton explore dealing with fantastic teachers who have challenging personalities.

Ed recalls a wonderful Philosophy teacher he had in college whose lectures Ed describes as “utterly fascinating” but whose personality he says was kind of “off-putting.”

But that naturally raises the question: Can a good teacher have, well, a bad personality?

Ed encourages students to steer clear of that simple dichotomy and instead examine potential reasons for behavior that may appear less than nurturing.

“He had incredibly high standards so that might have been kind of like the not-friendly part,” recalls Ed. “It’s not a matter of being nice, but it’s a matter of setting great expectations.”

Ed says society now desperately needs people to treat each with kindness, politeness and respect, especially when they disagree. But he believes sometimes teachers need to use different tools to motivate a group of students.

“There is something to be said for that kind of tough love, so it’s not meanness but it’s tough love,” Ed believes. “You want the person to be more independent. You want that person to reach further than they thought they could.”

Listen to the entire episode to hear why Ed also believes that, at least sometimes, that teacher “tough love” might be more of an act than the teacher’s true personality. Also listen on for the solution to last week’s Roman numerals puzzler (don’t worry – no tough love if you didn’t get it!).

This episode was recorded on Aug. 7, 2019.

After this episode was recorded, Dr. Ed Burger announced that he is leaving Southwestern University in Jan. 2020 to become President and Chief Executive Officer of St. David’s Foundation.

Back To School Supplies

It’s that time of the year — students are heading back to class and so is their stuff. That’s the inspiration for this Typewriter Rodeo poem.

Texas Standard: July 16, 2019

Not another presidential tweet or campaign jab, but a change in the federal register that could lead to a profound change at the southern border. The new rules could effectively stop asylum claims at the border with Mexico, and it is certain to get a challenge in court. We’ll take a closer look. Also, teachers were promised pay raises. But who gets what, and why? Some disappointed by the calculus are promising political payback. And a slowdown in oil country, layoffs coming? Quite the opposite. Those stories and then some today on the Texas Standard:

Standards

The Texas Legislature is considering changes to school standards. That was the inspiration for this Typewriter Rodeo poem.

Texas Standard: April 12, 2019

A push for teacher pay raises, but what about other state workers? State employees take to the streets in protest, we’ll have the latest. Also, the student government at Texas State university votes to ban a conservative student group. What the president of Texas State has to say about allegations of an attempt to curb conservative speech at the university. And there’s Lollapalooza, there’s ACL fest, and a new music festival for west Texas? Many locals say not so fast. Plus the week in Texas politics with the Texas Tribune and a whole lot more today on the Friday edition of the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 11, 2019

When was the last time you heard three top Texas Republicans call for a tax increase statewide? There’s more to the story, of course, and we’ve got it. Also, Texas may be tops in wind power, but the oil and gas industry not content taking a backseat. Asher Price of the Austin American Statesman on the pushback. And the latest social media platform to grab young people’s attention: why’s it Tic Tok’s time in the spotlight? Digital savant Omar Gallaga checks in. And the teacher in Lubbock making conversations about mental health an everyday thing for her students. All those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 4, 2019

Texas house lawmakers give the green light to a 9 billion dollar school funding bill plus a teacher pay raise. But what happens next will be critical. Also, after a slap on the wrist from the nation’s high court, a major change coming to Texas’ execution chamber. We’ll have the what and why. Also, the pay gap for women in tech. And what could be rare bipartisan action in congress, this time to deal with what some call a retirement savings crisis. Plus your weekend trip tip and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 3, 2019

Just two weeks after the petrochemical disaster in Deer Park, another chemical fire at a plant outside of Houston: this one deadly. We’ll have the latest. Plus: 9 dead, 20 injured, nearly 200 arrested and 4 years later, all cases dismissed yesterday without a single conviction. What happened after the Waco biker shootout? And what are the lessons? Plus, a warning about a quarter of Texas’ dams, we’ll take a look. And they call it the Rio Grande Valley, but where are the mountains? Our commentator W.F. Strong on an etymological mystery and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 2, 2019

The price of a would-be border shutdown? We’ll do the numbers and talk with the mayor of one of Texas’ biggest border cities, Laredo. Plus, 2020: it’s not just about counting votes, but counting heads, too. We’ll look at what’s at stake for Texas in the upcoming census. Also, after previous fits and starts, prospects get real for for full day pre-k covered by the state, we’ll have the latest. And San Antonio goes all in on a plan to let outside organizations run their schools. Also, a fiddle playing son pays tribute to his father and his role in shaping Texas music. All of those stories and then some today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 18, 2019

Wallace Hall fought a bitter battle with the University of Texas alleging corrupt admissions policies. Considering new revelations, was he right all along? We’ll have a conversation with the former University of Texas regent about a college admissions process once dubbed affirmative action for the advantaged. Also, when it comes to performance based pay for teachers, do some teachers have a built in advantage over others? And a ruling in a case that could hold gunmakers liable in the wake of mass shootings. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: February 28, 2019

A key provision of the Texas open meetings act struck down by the state’s highest criminal court. We’ll look at what it means for government transparency. Also, the state’s school librarians read the fine print of a bill to hike teacher salaries, and they’re pushing back. We’ll hear from the state’s top librarian. Plus the timeless voice of tejano superstar Selena. Was it one voice, or two? All those stores and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: February 20, 2019

Lawsuits mounting over the Texas Secretary of State’s efforts to purge voter rolls of suspected non-citizens, we’ll have the latest. Also, lawmakers promised a focus on education and now, a big push for an across the board pay raise of 5 thousand dollars. So why the muted applause from public school educators? We’ll find out. And Southwest Airlines declares an operational emergency planes, with nearly 200 flights cancelled and little love lost between company chiefs and its mechanics union, we’ll look at details. All those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: February 8, 2019

The confirmation of a republican Governor Secretary of State nominee: a slam dunk in the republican led Texas senate? Not this time. David Whitley facing an uphill battle to be confirmed as Secretary of State after questioning the citizenship of almost 100 thousand Texas voters, we’ll hear the latest. Also, Senator John Cornyn set for easy re-election in 2020, wanna Bet-o? Cornyn himself not taking any chances after seeing what happened in 2018. All that and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 31, 2019

First the ranches, then the big cities. Come 2020, is the next great political battleground in the Lone Star State the suburbs? We’ll take a closer look. Also, senator John Cornyn now warning fellow Republicans that President Trump could lose Texas in 2020. Is the Lone Star State no longer reliably red? The answer might be found in the suburbs. And although the Permian basin’s booming, we might be on the road to a new foreign energy dependence, we’ll hear why. All that and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard: