Supreme Court of the United States

An Indigenous perspective on the solar eclipse from a traditional healer

In a long-running securities fraud case against Ken Paxton, a deal has been reached that will let the attorney general avoid trial or an admission of guilt.
The U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral arguments today in what could be the most important case on reproductive rights since the Dobbs decision, this time on access to medication abortion.
Autonomous vehicles are getting a lot of bad press. Could smart roads pave the way to self-driving cars and trucks? A smart highway in Texas may put that to the test.
Marika Alvarado, who describes herself as a “direct descendant of generations of Medicine Women: traditional native healers of body, midwives and plant medicine,” shares her Indigenous perspective on the solar eclipse.
And: A UT San Antonio professor has dubbed the upcoming eclipse “the most profitable 22 minutes in Texas history.” Bulent Temel joins the show with more.

The state’s only sugar mill is closing. What’s next for sugar cane farmers?

New laws – one from Texas – to regulate platforms like Facebook and TikTok are getting Supreme Court scrutiny today, with potentially profound implications.
Years of drought have devastated sugar growers in South Texas – so much so that the state’s only sugar mill is closing.
Austin’s I-35, the spine of the region’s roadway grid, is about to undergo the largest expansion since the highway opened in 1962. Nathan Bernier joins with a drill down into what it means.
And: We’ll learn about a device that can help blind and low-vision people experience the eclipse.

Everything you need to know about cedar fever

Arguments are set for today in a challenge to Texas’ near-total abortion ban. Eleanor Klibanoff of the Texas Tribune with more about a major abortion case before the state Supreme Court.

A securities case before the U.S. Supreme Court could destroy the U.S. government, according to some critics. We’ll try to sort the hyperbole from the facts.

A Texas-based international relations expert weighs in with more on the extended ceasefire between Israel and Hamas.

They call it cedar fever season – only there’s no fever, and for some, the suffering lasts more than a season. Top tips for dealing with a Texas scourge.

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Tracing the foodways of Black Seminoles

The Supreme Court finally has its own ethics code for justices following a series of scandals – including a Texas billionaire showering gifts on Justice Clarence Thomas. Will this new code of conduct make a difference?

Bison once ruled the Great Plains of North America before being hunted almost to extinction. We’ll hear about how Indigenous people in Texas are supporting their slow rebound.

For descendants of Black Seminoles – a group whose members included former slaves and the Seminole native people – finding foodways through Texas and Mexico takes care and intention.

And: Colleges can no longer use race as a determining factor in admissions, thanks to a Supreme Court decision earlier this year. What’s the upshot? It may surprise you.

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We’re tracking Texas cryptids all October

From guns to religion, free speech and more, a very loaded docket awaits the Supreme Court as it begins a new term.

Why a race for Houston’s top financial officer is getting so much attention.

A plan to consolidate schools in San Antonio could leave behind almost 20 empty buildings – and the district needs to figure out what to do with them.

As the dollar strengthens, other currencies weaken. But there’s a notable outlier: We’ll look at why the Mexican peso seems to be doing so well.

Also, as the spookiest month of the year gets started, a look at why Texas is so full of mysterious creatures unconfirmed by science.

What the Supreme Court’s ruling on student loans means for Texans

We have the latest on two rulings today from the Supreme Court: one striking down President Joe Biden’s student loan forgiveness plan, and another in favor of a web designer who refused to do wedding work for same-sex couples.

In about 30 years the number of banks across the United States has dropped by 75%. One perspective on what that means for consumers.

It’s always mosquito season in Texas, but there’s some reason to be extra cautious right now about getting bit. How to protect yourself from mosquito-borne illnesses.

Harder math classes may be in store for many Texas middle schoolers – why supporters of a new law say this is really good news.

And a wrap of one Texas special legislative session and the start of another. What you need to know to end your week.

New law will allow chaplains in Texas public schools

The Supreme Court just struck down two race-based university admissions programs. What does it mean for Texas?

Even though Texas lawmakers knew federal money was on the way for expanding high-speed Internet access across the state, they decided to also implement their own program. A look at why.

A new podcast takes a deep dive into the decisions that have made Austin such an expensive place to live – and one where people of color were systematically pushed out.

And a new Texas law set to go into effect will allow public schools to have volunteer chaplains or even to hire them as part of the staff. We’ll hear the argument against the law.

How the ‘We Buy Ugly Houses’ company preyed on desperate and elderly sellers

Migrant crossings at the border with Mexico are reported to be dramatically down after the end of Title 42.

Adolescent medicine doctors at Dell Children’s Medical Center in Austin are out amid calls from politicians for an investigation of gender-affirming care at the hospital.

A bill to preempt new local regulations on a variety of issues including labor and the environment moves quickly toward an expected passage in the Texas Senate.

And what’s the story behind those “We Buy Ugly Houses” signs? A ProPublica investigation reveals that the buyers behind the signs took advantage of elderly homeowners.

This Texas label makes records the old-school way

Texas’ law against censoring political speech on social media is not in force for now, but that could change. Also: Truckers like to say they keep America rolling, but more are leaving the profession than ever – and it could have major ripple effects for everyone. Plus: A generation gap in high-tech, and a major difference in how sweeping layoffs are being felt. And: A Texas nonprofit founded to support voting restrictions tried to build a hospital in Ukraine; it has not gone as planned, and now red flags are going up.

New invasive species sighted in Southeast Texas nature preserve

The Supreme Court of the United States issues its first orders and opinions of the new year. UT Legal scholar Steven Vladek on the impact and what to watch for today. Other stories we’re tracking: the week ahead at the Texas lege: Sergio Martinez-Beltrán of the Texas newsroom on attention turning to teachers and the classroom. And President Biden’s Border initiatives and the connection to past administrations’ efforts to manage immigration. Also an historic grand hotel in Palacios spared from the wrecking ball, at least for the moment. And a surprising discovery at a huge federal nature preserve in southeast Texas. Plus the Cowboys maintain their losing streak in the playoffs and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 1, 2022

What the Supreme Court ruling in an environmental case filed by West Virginia means for Texas and the world at large. Its a decision seen as severely hampering the Biden Administrations efforts to curb climate change. We’ll take a closer look. Also a pair of first amendment rulings on religious freedom and what they add up to for everyday life. And Texas police chiefs offer a list of recommendations to reduce the number school shootings including changes to gun laws. Plus more listener reaction to the demise of Roe v. wade, the week in politics with the Texas Tribune and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 28, 2022

An horrific discovery outside of San Antonio where investigators describe one of the deadliest human smuggling incidents in years. The bodies of at least 50 people, all suspected migrants, found in and around an unair-conditioned abandoned tractor trailer truck. We’ll have the latest. Also the continued repercussions of the Dobbs decision. How the fall of Roe factors into Texas politics: specifically the race for governor. Plus post Roe privacy concerns and the intersection with technology, including the smartphone. And the push for truancy reforms after the shooting in Uvalde and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 21, 2022

An excruciating inside look at what happened during a critical 70+ minutes inside Robb Elementary on that May 24th, 2022 in Uvalde. Though officials have been reluctant to release video evidence from the mass shooting in Uvalde, Terri Langford of the Texas Tribune has seen critical footage from inside the school. She shares with us what she’s discovered. Also Brian Chasnoff of the San Antonio express reports that classroom doors may not have been locked, contrary to one of the key claims made by law enforcement. We’ll have details. Also a very public transitioning for a Texas small town celebrity. And an update on what’s left for the Supreme Court. All of that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 4, 2022

On today’s show we’ll explain the trigger law that would mostly ban abortion in Texas if Roe v. wade is overturned. Plus, have Texans had enough of highways? Some transportation activists are taking it to the streets. And are you familiar with Toadsuck? Don’t be offended, it’s the name of a place. Commentator W.F. Strong will tell you all about it. And we’ve got back to school book bans in San Antonio and of course the latest news from across the Lone Star State today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 3, 2022

“We hold that Roe and Casey must be overruled” – that’s a quote from Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito in an opinion leaked last night. We’ll talk about what happens next on today’s show. Plus the cost increases for Operation Lone Star. As the border security mission drags on, it’s being funded by money meant for state agencies. And an intercontinental railway that will now bypass Texas. We’ll tell you why. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Grammy Time

Fresh and Confucius talk about the 2022 Grammy Awards and discuss T.I.’s recent run in with another comedian at a comedy club.

This week on Hip-Hop Facts you’ll learn about the high school rap battles between Busta Rhymes and Jay-Z, what happened when Warren and G Nate Dogg performed “Regulate” at the Billboard Awards, why Biggie wrote who “Who Shot Ya?” and more.

Fresh states the Unpopular Opinion that Top Dawg Entertainment is overrated.

Confucius blends his old segment Confucius Says with Confucius Reads the News when he talks about Kentaji Brown Jackson’s appointment to the Supreme Court and discusses the value of fearlessness in life, and the lack of value of haters .

Texas Standard: March 25, 2022

The Supreme Court rules in a case involving death row inmates and the involvement of spiritual advisors at executions. We’ll look at the implications. Other stories were tracking: after a court ordered stay, Texas attorney general Ken Paxton appeals to the Texas supreme court to permit child abuse investigations into parents who help their transgender kids access gender-affirming care. Also, with the expiration of pandemic bans on evictions, something somewhat unexpected happening in some courtrooms. We’ll hear the backstory. Plus the week in Texas politics and the search for the ultimate roller coaster. All that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 23, 2022

Texas two senators press President Biden’s Supreme Court nominee in historic confirmation hearings at the capitol. Todd Gilman of the Dallas Morning News with more on the roles of Senator John Cornyn and Ted Cruz in the confirmation hearings of Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson. Also, does Texas need an independent monitor of the natural gas industry? A conversation with a Texas Senator pushing for this change. Plus a book that is as much a celebration of Texas 250 rivers as it is a warning. And why allegations of sexual abuse against the Boy Scouts are factors in a bankruptcy court settlement. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 21, 2022

Historic confirmation hearings begin for the first Black woman nominated to sit on the highest court in the nation. What to expect in the confirmation hearings for Ketanji Brown Jackson. A Houston-based legal scholar weighs in. Also, the U.S. repose to the invasion of Ukraine. With President Biden set to go to Europe this week, Texas democratic congressman Mark Veasey of Fort Worth joins us to talk about what comes next. And a Johnson Space Center Historian on Making Space for Women in the story of NASA. And big trouble for small airports across the Lone Star State. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 10, 2022

As the Omicron variant continues to feed a spike in COVID-19 cases in Texas, the Supreme Court hears arguments against vaccine mandates. We’ll have more on how the high court might be moving on vaccine mandates for large businesses and many health care providers. Meanwhile, Texas restaurants asking the state for millions of dollars to help them make it through the pandemic. Also, another round in the legal battle against SB8, the recently passed abortion restrictions in Texas. We’ll have the latest. And Texas to be home to the nation’s new biotech triangle. A major development or mostly marketing? Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard: