Storm

Food safety & tree protection tips as Texas awaits an arctic blast

Most parts of Texas are preparing for a big freeze as an arctic front moves in. We’ll have the latest on what to expect, plus how to prepare your trees to survive a Texas winter and tips on food and food safety in case the power goes out.

The U.S., U.K. and other allies have launched retaliatory airstrikes against Houthi rebels in Yemen; some fear it could expand global tensions and widen the conflict ongoing in Gaza. A UT expert on global studies weighs in.

Plus: The week in politics with The Texas Tribune.

Texas Spring

The weather does not always perfectly align with the changes in season. And, in Texas, those seasonal highs and lows are often very dramatic. That was the inspiration for this Typewriter Rodeo poem.

Is Houston still affordable?

An orange haze, a vicious wind, in some places visibility cut close to zero – is an exiting dust storm a warning of more? With high winds expected to return later this week, what the layers of dust across Texas may tell us about changes to our climate.

A recent survey from the U.S. Census Bureau revealed roughly four out of five Houstonians are stressed out about recent price increases – raising the question of whether Houston still deserves its long-held reputation as one of the most affordable large cities in the country.

Tens of thousands protest against the president in Mexico amid concerns about threats to elections there.

A bill set to raise the penalties for illegal voting in Texas gets the green light from a Senate committee.

On Rare Disease Day 2023, we’ll hear how advocates for people with such diseases are pushing for change.

And an online hack targeting Asian Texans.

What the cold wrought

Texas is still picking up the pieces from another devastating February freeze. Some of the primary victims this round were trees big and small. That was the inspiration for this Typewriter Rodeo poem.

What zoos are doing to stay safe

Funding for public education is set to take center stage at the Capitol. Sergio Martínez-Beltrán of the Texas Newsroom joins us with what to expect this week as the Senate finance committee takes up education funding.

Some Texas lawmakers say student mental health is a top priority this legislative session. We’ll take a closer look at what’s being proposed.

Nearly two years after a major winter storm that knocked out power statewide, the city of San Antonio is facing a federal lawsuit that says its emergency preparedness plan is in violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Plus: After a series of animal disappearances at the Dallas Zoo, how are zoos and aquariums rethinking security?

Answering your tree questions in the wake of the ice storm

Insurance claims are about to spike as Texans try to recover from storm damage – a Texas insurance specialist advises how best to move forward with claims: what to do, and what not to do. We’re also answering your questions about trees and ice damage.

We take a look at what winter storms have done to the state’s aviation industry.

The Standard’s own Sean Saldana shares new Texas job numbers and what they tell us about the state of the economy.

And the Texas Tribune’s James Barragán with the week that was in Texas politics.

Marfa art exhibit honors the railroad’s Chinese laborers

Nearly 400,000 homes and businesses are still without power in Texas, but the worst of the freezing rain may be behind us. Mose Buchele of the Disconnect podcast and KUT Austin joins us with more on the power situation.

A new poll suggests a disconnect between the headlines and what Texans really think of the state’s public schools.

Our focus on the push to cut property taxes in the Texas Legislature turns to how schools are funded in Texas.

And an effort to turn attention to a largely forgotten story of how Chinese labor helped to build West Texas.

Why Fort Worth ISD is canceling sex ed this year

Fallen trees and branches, downed power lines and more as Texas weathers the first statewide winter storm of 2023. The worst of the weather stretches along a line west of I-35, but most Texans are feeling the impact one way or another, with driving extremely hazardous and scattered outages leaving hundreds of thousands without power.

There’s been lots of talk about property taxes in this legislative session. How’d they get so high in the first place?

Fort Worth ISD scraps its plans for a sex education course after spending millions in the ramp-up. So why the reversal?

Also a PolitiFact check of gun violence claims.

What would property tax relief from the Legislature mean for Texas renters?

Winter storm and travel advisories across much of Texas with some forecast models indicating things could get worse. Victor Murphy of the National Weather Service with more on the icy situation that’s already led to many school closures and stranded motorists overnight.

Our closeup on property taxes continues as the Legislature sets its sights on cuts. The Texas Standard’s Sean Saldana has more on what this means for renters.

The Standard’s Shelly Brisbin on how advocates for Texans with disabilities are turning up the heat on lawmakers at the Capitol.

And 30 years after the Branch Davidian siege, we’re talking to Kevin Cook, author of the new book “Waco Rising.”

How to prepare for extreme winter weather in Texas

With just days to go before the start of the Texas legislative session, a long awaited report on maternal mortality finally sees the light of day. We’ll have details. Also, with 2500 migrants a day lining up to turn themselves in to the Border Patrol here, and numbers expected to rise, we’ll look at how local officials are hoping to manage the situation. My conversation with the El Paso County Judge. And after dozens fall sick, Louisiana Health Officials warn about Texas Oysters. We take a deep dive on what’s causing the problems and the impact on the industry. Plus the week in politics with the Texas Tribune and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 22, 2022

Tornados, damaging winds and hail wreak destruction across Texas. Several state agencies still responding to storm damage in north and central Texas and tens of thousands are reported without power. We’ll have the latest on the weather front. Also, the head of investigations for the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services resigns as questions mount over allegations of sexual exploitation at a shelter in Bastrop. Plus efforts to secure the return of a Houston native and WNBA star now held in Russia. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: February 3, 2022

Winter Storm Landon wreaking havoc across Texas. We’ll be checking in with Dallas, Lubbock, Midland, Austin and more as we track the effects of what has been described as the first big test of the state’s power grid since last year’s winter storm that left millions in the dark. Also Mose Buchele, who’s been tracking the power grid and changes to the power infrastructure since last years deadly storm, brings us the latest on where we stand with blackouts and electricity supply and demand. All that and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: December 28, 2021

She was a new Texas attorney with little experience who won her case before the Supreme Court setting a precedent on reproductive rights. The passing of Sarah Weddington comes as many across the nation wonder how much longer the rights established in her best known case, Roe vs. Wade, will endure. We’ll have more. Also, with winters’ return an investigation of the hazards of portable power generators linked to fatalities during the statewide blackouts. And researchers in South Texas seek answers to the question ‘why are Latinos disproportionately affected by Alzheimer’s?’. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: December 24, 2021

In the aftermath of a historic winter storm and deadly rolling blackouts came recriminations – but are we any more ready for this winter? Before the Texas power crisis of last February there were warnings about the power grid. After the storm came the promises for change, to fix the problems and to be better prepared for the next time. What did state leaders do to make sure something like the February blackout never happens again? And what role did deregulation play in the failure of the Texas power grid? From the podcast The Disconnect – answers to those questions and much more on a special edition of the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 14, 2021

We’ll bring you the latest on tropical storm Nicholas. Also, a carefully crafted letter from Bell county officials to their community. We’ll listen to their heart-wrenching message. And sometimes it’s hard to understand what the FCC does, but this time it’s straightforward. It’s setting aside money for people who need better internet access. We’ll also learn about a boot camp. Not the kind where you drop down and give me 50, but a boot camp that gets soldiers ready for college. And Cricket, the sport, is investing big time in North Texas. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 22, 2021

Sounding new alarms over COVID-19… As state health experts warn of new cases, are the warnings enough? Experts see the COVID-19 data in Texas pointing an ominous direction, and though warnings for masking and vaccination continue, concerns mount over whether that will be sufficient to head off another dangerous spike in the pandemic. Today, our conversation with the Texas’ chief epidemiologist. Also the fight over COVID-19 disinformation. And after years of calls for changes, medicaid is being expanded to help new moms in Texas. The implications of that change plus much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 20, 2021

Increasing concerns among doctors and other frontline health workers in Texas as COVID-19 cases rise once again. In some places in Texas, the COVID-19 risk level has again returned to historic highs as the Covid Delta variant takes hold. We’ll talk with two Texas health experts about what the trends are signaling. Also the FDA’s approval of an Alzheimer’s drug, and why some doctors are refusing to prescribe the drug, and lawmakers are asking questions. And an historic liftoff in west Texas. Plus the end of an era for Texas’ oldest licensed radio station? Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 2, 2021

The walkout at the capitol over voting restrictions sparks one kind of response from the governor, but a different tone from the GOP House speaker. As governor Abbott threatens to withhold legislative pay over the house’s failure to pass a restrictive voting bill, the GOP speaker of the House defends the democratic walkout that scuttled the bill. Also in parts of Texas hardest hit by COVID-19, vaccination rates now surpass those of the rest of the state. We’ll hear why. And the real death toll from the winter freeze and power outages, a new report claims a massive undercount.Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 17, 2021

Much work still left to do before the gavel falls on the Texas legislative session. Reporters from the Houston Chronicle and the Dallas Morning News weigh in on what’s been done and what’s left to do in the final two weeks of the legislative session. Also millions of dollars to help stop evictions in Houston. Why aren’t all landlords taking the cash? And despite changes in policies under the new administration, transgender migrants stuck on the other side of the border. And something big brewing in Pennsylvania…now brewing in Texas, too? Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 16, 2021

As another mass shooting makes headlines, victims families and survivors of a mass shooting in Texas make their case against the Air Force. The case underway in a San Antonio courtroom asks whether the Air Force should be held liable in the Sutherland Springs church shooting in which 26 people were killed, 20 others injured in 2017. We’ll have the latest. Also amid a debate over so called vaccine passports, a proposal in Texas that would change the way records for vaccinations are collected by the state. Plus how Ramadan is becoming more and more a part of the multicultural fabric of Texas. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard: