Solar

Exploring the tale of the Chupacabra

A deal over school vouchers at the Legislature – or high political theatre? As Gov. Greg Abbott declares victory, others have their doubts. Sergio Martínez-Beltrán of The Texas Newsroom shares the latest.

You’ve heard of solar farms, but how well do animals share that land? Why agrivoltaic farms are popping up all over Texas.

And our spooky season isn’t over. The Texas Standard’s Kristen Cabrera explores the story of the arguable king of the Texas cryptids: the Chupacabra.

Dungeons & Dragons becomes lifeline for some Texas death row prisoners

When it comes the electric grid, every megawatt counts during peak demand. Industrial batteries have long been seen as a potential game-changer for energy storage. We’ll have details about how they’re coming online in the Lone Star State.

A new vaccine for COVID-19 will be in pharmacies soon. An epidemiologist lays out what you and your family needs to know.

Plus, Dungeons & Dragons on death row, the latest headlines, and a school finance revolt in North Texas.

Railroad Commission approves South Texas coal mine expansion

In the first Republican debate of the new presidential election season, an issue top of mind for Texans – border policy – takes center stage.

The Texas Department of Transportation is giving a final green light to a highway expansion in downtown Austin that would add at least four lanes and get rid of the road’s existing upper decks.

There’s pushback on solar development in rural northeast Texas.

Energy regulators greenlit a 12,000-acre expansion of a South Texas coal mine on Tuesday, despite locals’ environmental concerns.

And with strays being turned away by many animal shelters, a first-time cat owner – the Standard’s Sean Saldaña – reflects on his first month with his new pet.

How UT scientists are using AI to read thoughts

What happens to a Republican-led plan to provide taxpayer money for private education if the Texas Senate and House can’t reach agreement in less than two weeks? The governor’s promising he’ll keep the Legislature in session.

The latest on bills aimed at banning access to gender-affirming care for young people.

Mind-reading technology? We’ll talk with a UT researcher at the forefront of the tech using artificial intelligence to interpret brain activity.

Also: Finding the best burgers in Texas.

NASA mission sounds like a reality show, but it’s gathering data for a Mars journey

One of the state’s biggest counties is looking for a new top election official amid friction over the difficulty of running non-partisan elections. With early voting underway in races statewide, why the resignation of the top elections official in Tarrant County has special resonance.

A closer look at claims of Republican voter suppression in Harris County: how does the narrative square with the data?

In parts of rural Texas, growing opposition to solar and wind farms, where Texas has taken a lead.

And a virtual mission to Mars, in a hangar south of Houston? Four people, one year, and little contact with the outside world.

Texas Standard: June 17, 2022

Is there a big push for Governor Abbott at the Texas GOP Convention? Not exactly… Sergio Martínez-Beltrán of the Texas Newsroom with the latest. Other stories we’re tracking, more warnings of record demand for electricity in coming days as Texas tries to beat the heat. While wind and solar getting credit for helping us avoid major blackouts, why these ongoing warnings? And is Texas moving quickly enough to meet constantly growing demand? Also, a new massive SpaceX rocket test cleared for liftoff in South Texas? The FAA imposes new restrictions. And reflections on Juneteenth: do Black Texans consider themselves really free? Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 21, 2021

The special session walkout: a stalemate? Or could this add up to a new political math in Texas longer term? A new group of younger Texas democrats willing to sharpen their message and their elbows, see the walkout as energizing the base and perhaps changing the political mix longer term. But are they right? We’ll explore. Also, Texans going for the gold in Japan…though the cloud of COVID-19 hangs over the Olympics, a view from a Texan in Tokyo covering the games. And in a Texas city known for its distinctive sound, a distinctive new installation aimed at the ears. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 28, 2020

With almost two weeks to go before the first ballots are cast in Texas for the general election, a court decision that could change the rules for voters. A federal court tosses new rules against straight ticket voting and the state attorney general plans an appeal. We’ll hear what the impact could be for Texas voters. Also, Governor Abbott’s not on the ballot, but in a special election set for tomorrow his pandemic policies are front and center, exposing a deepening rift among republicans. And a rare voice on radio marks a golden anniversary: the Texas-based In Black America and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 13, 2020

Seemingly endless rows of cars lined up waiting for food in San Antonio: we’ll check out the strain on efforts to feed the hungry in other parts of Texas. Plus, is a tool used to recover memories lost to trauma acceptable for use in police work? An investigative report by the Dallas Morning News raises questions about the use of hypnosis in criminal cases in Texas. Also, life in the federal lockup. Now under lockdown amid growing concerns for the prison population and for staff. And how a pandemic affects a political push to flip the Texas house. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 20, 2019

The governor launches a second panel to address immediate safety concerns in the aftermath of the El Paso shooting. What’s different? We’ll take a look. Among the lawmakers assigned to the new Texas safety commission, several from the El Paso area: Democratic representative Mary Gonzales on what she hopes will come out of the newly created Texas Safety Commission. Also, why Dallas is turning to a task force to deal with rising homicide rates. And are national developers driving up college debt? All those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 2, 2019

The price of a would-be border shutdown? We’ll do the numbers and talk with the mayor of one of Texas’ biggest border cities, Laredo. Plus, 2020: it’s not just about counting votes, but counting heads, too. We’ll look at what’s at stake for Texas in the upcoming census. Also, after previous fits and starts, prospects get real for for full day pre-k covered by the state, we’ll have the latest. And San Antonio goes all in on a plan to let outside organizations run their schools. Also, a fiddle playing son pays tribute to his father and his role in shaping Texas music. All of those stories and then some today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 4, 2019

U.S. Representative Will Hurd of Texas is a Republican but he sided with Democrats yesterday in a vote to reopen the government. We’ll ask him why. Also, volatility: It’s a term investors don’t much like to hear in talks about the stock market. Why the last several weeks have been so up and down. Also, security is a term houses of worship are reconsidering after sanctuaries have become targets. We’ll hear from church and mosque leaders in Texas. And federal employees suing the government, the latest on court battle over the Affordable Care Act, and a little arts and poetry today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 21, 2017

As demonstrators and counter protestors take sides in cities, how’s the showdown over confederate monuments playing out in small town Texas? We’ll have the latest. Also after declaring a phase out at the federal level, the return of private lockups. Texas seems to be a magnet. And water bottles in national parks, making an official comeback? We’ll hear what’s behind it. And help wanted: an aging population sparks a booming business in stay at home home health care across the lone star state. Plus facts and fiction surrounding a certain solar event: slip on those safety specs and turn up the volume because it’s Texas Standard time:

Texas Standard: August 18, 2017

In a place where there’s little water already, rising demand raising the stakes for everyone. We’re live from Marfa Public Radio today! Also, he may have hit a wall with congress, but President trump is moving fast to make a lasting mark on another front, and Texas is ground zero. Tilting the balance on the federal bench. And just a few miles from here they’re warming up the famous Mcdonald observatory telescopes as the US prepares for a rare solar eclipse. But why’s this one so special, and for researchers, what left to learn? And sine die for the special session, the week in Texas politics and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 17, 2017

Dennis Quaid or Eva Longoria for Senate? Tommy Lee Jones for governor? Texas democrats looking for star power. The real story today on the Standard.

As the governor announces his reelection plans, who’s on the bench to top the ticket for the other party?

Texas tops in cattle—but tops in something else you won’t hear about–number one in agricultural land getting lapped up by foreign buyers. We’ll hear who’s buying and why.

Solar panels used to be promoted by energy companies as a smart way to save money. Now some of those same power companies want to charge you extra for using those panels.

Plus, discovering Robocop’s Texas accent and a whole lot more.

Texas Standard: July 7, 2017

Shots fired: a year after a deadly shootout at an otherwise peaceful march in Dallas, how much has healed and where are the scars? We’ll explore. Also many thought the black death the stuff of history books, but the plague is back, and its in west Texas. A CDC researcher tells us why. And back to the future? A Texas city decides the best way to secure elections: a return to the paper ballot. And researchers battle an unexpected problem for solar power, you might think of it as burnout. Those stories and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: December 29, 2016

Corruption on the border. We all know it’s there, but are you aware just how much it’s happening on this side of the Rio Grande? Also Texas lawmakers will spend a lot of time talking about education funding in the next few months. School districts and tax payers will want to pay attention. And some environmentalists worry renewables won’t get the same attention under Trump. The conservative case for solar. Also: Dilley, Texas is known these days for its family detention center. How it’s shaped the south Texas city. If Texas were made up of just 100 people, can you guess how many would live east of I-35? Plus, a look back at the top tech stories of 2016 and more on todays Texas Standard: