school

Texas Standard: December 29, 2020

As many anticipate the start of the New Year, many Texas public school officials fear what the stroke of midnight might mean for them. A hold harmless guarantee for Texas public schools expected to expire on December 31st. For districts facing a drop off in attendance, will there be enough money to maintain operations? Also, racial disparities in the pandemic spark a rethink of who’s most at risk to COVID-19. We’ll also look at concerns about social isolation and seasonal affective disorder. And with the launch of a U.S. Space Force, plans to find a home for the U.S. space command. Could it be landing in Texas? Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 26, 2020

It’s Thanksgiving Day and we’re re-broadcasting a special show for you. Overlooked No More: How Asian Texans shape the state. Today we’ll talk about How the Asian American community has changed since 1870, the first time the U.S. census counted people from China to today. Also, we’ll meet a group called the “Pershing Chinese” – a story of Chinese immigration through Mexico. Then we’ll travel to the border where a vibrant Filipino community settled. And is it time to re-evaluate the holidays we officially recognize in Texas? All of those stories and more on today’s special edition of the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 16, 2020

As Coronavirus cases tick upwards again in Texas, some schools are returning to laptops and tablets. But others are going the opposite direction. Coming up our conversations with the superintendents of two Texas school districts where back to school is the rule, despite concerns about an uptick in Coronavirus cases. We’ll hear the rationale. Also you’ve heard of the great recession. Now the spotlight turns to what Texas researchers are calling the economic “she-session” of 2020. Plus the week in Texas politics with the Texas Tribune and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 2, 2020

Governor Abbott orders no more than one drop off point for absentee ballots per county. The official in charge of elections for Travis county is pushing back against the governor saying all options are open. We’ll have the latest. Also, how the president’s positive test for Coronavirus has the potential to move the needle in a big way for Texas come election day. Plus Texas doctors concerned about chronic Coronavirus. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 29, 2020

A Texas county sheriff has turned himself in to the county jail he oversees after an investigation of evidence tampering in the death of a Black motorist. The sheriff of Williamson county indicted on felony charges stemming from the destruction of video evidence in death of Javier Ambler. This after a police chase filmed for a so-called reality TV show, we’ll have the latest. Also, where’s the beef? For many in this pandemic, its being shipped to the front door, causing ripple effects across the supply chain, we’ll explain. Plus disappearing Coronavirus data for schools and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 22, 2020

A Beta test for southeast Texas as rains pummel the region, roads are closed, schools shift plans and officials warn to stay put, we’ll have the latest. Also, COVID-19 has hit retail hard, but what about retail politics? The pandemic’s impact on a political season like few others in recent memory. Plus, Latino political power in Texas: under lockdown or primed to make major waves on election day? We’ll explore. And the U.S. Department of Transportation gives the green light to the Texas bullet train connecting Dallas to Houston in 90 minutes. All aboard? Not quite. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 17, 2020

The end of the month is fast approaching and that means time is running out to complete the 2020 census. With only a few days left on the census, we check in with counties in East Texas, far West Texas and Southwest Texas. Plus, a U.S. Congresswoman tells us why she was moved to introduce legislation after the gruesome murder of Fort Hood Army Specialist Vannessa Guillen. Also on COVID-19, we check in with San Antonio. And we tell you why some COVID-19 tests are so expensive? Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 10, 2020

The politics of policing part two: the mayor of Austin pushes back against the governor’s call to take a pledge not to defund police. Coming up our conversation with Austin mayor Steve Adler who says characterizations of major cutbacks in the Texas capital city’s police funding amount to GOP politics as usual. We’ll hear more Also, changes to the sex ed curriculum in Texas, LGBTQ students say proposals are woefully inadequate as social conservatives push an abstinence only message. And the threat to a burgeoning industry, Texas wineries teaming up. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 2, 2020

It is the first detailed look at the impact of the pandemic on state services and it includes a billion dollars in cutbacks. A thick document detailing how hard COVID-19 will hit Texas’ budgetary bottom line, the biggest hit to social services. Asher Price of the Austin American Statesman got the story and he joins us. Also, a Texas state senator demanding congress step forward to help find out why so many apparent killings at Fort Hood. And does a Texas city really hold the nation’s top spot in a jump in crime? A Politifact check and more today on the Texas Standard:

Poem For A Rising Freshman

Students are headed back to school. For many, that’s in a virtual way. For almost all, it’s different than last fall. That was the inspiration for this Typewriter Rodeo poem.

Texas Standard: August 12, 2020

Historic: Vice President Joe Biden picks his own VP. Senator Kamala Harris and the intersection of race and gender in American politics. Also, back to school this year is filled with stress and anxieties for all. A conversation about the challenges in special education during this pandemic. Plus, what is the recovery rate of COVID-19 and can we even really answer that question? And entertainment awards season is just around the corner. It’s usually fancy dresses and red carpets but it will look different this year, many hope in more way than one. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 10, 2020

Congress couldn’t agree, so President Trump picked up a pen. But what exactly will his executive actions over the weekend do? We’ll explore. Also, trial by Zoom: how a couple of cases in San Antonio and Austin could set precedent across the country. And the road to a vaccine. Efforts for a COVID-19 vaccine are moving much faster than usual. How’s that working? Also, schools are reopening and families are making decisions about whether and how to send kids back. We’ll hear from a few. And an East Texas man wins big in a lawsuit, and we’re not talking money. Those stories and more coming up on today’s Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 31, 2020

Ready for the new school year? School administrators across the Lone Star State say wait a minute. We’ll explore. Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton offers guidance but, it’s not enough. What school administrators are asking for. Could local police academies be scrapped? Are they a natural place to trim city budgets? We check in with one of Texas’ top police academy experts. What Title 42 Expulsions mean, our report from Mexico City. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 22, 2020

The state’s largest school district has plans to start the year online and could extend that a little more. Houston ISD’s interim superintendent joins us to talk about the weight of planning this school year. We’ll also hear from teachers who are frankly afraid for themselves and their families, but also love being in the classroom. And a Texas law expert joins us to parse out exactly what’s going on with federal agents arresting people in Portland. Plus a harrowing story about COVID-19 and Texas ICE detention centers. That and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 20, 2020

Facing pushback from educators, parents and health officials the Texas Education Agency rolls back its initial orders for in person classes in the fall. Also, how parents in Texas’ largest metro area are trying to juggle mixed messages over a back to school plans in the fall. And new research in Texas showing promise for those suffering from COVID-19. Also, a new study on the connection between natural gas flaring and premature births. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 17, 2020

For many school districts: competing mandates from state leaders and local health officials leaving teachers parents and kids in limbo. Our conversation with superintendent of EL Paso ISD on the practical challenges of reopening public schools. Also, more on a newly unveiled proposal to cut 130 million dollars from state health services as the Coronavirus fight continues. And 5 years after the death of Sandra Bland, the mark she left at her alma mater, and on a movement. Plus the week in politics with the Texas Tribune and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 15, 2020

Results from primary runoff day in Texas are setting the stage for a general election like few others in Texas history. We’ll take a look at the outcomes in some closely watched runoffs statewide and what the balloting hints at for election day in November. Also many companies asking for and getting getting a pass on environmental regulations in Texas. And in Lubbock: a test run for a return to campus in the fall, a Politifact check of a claim about the Texas education agency and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 14, 2020

New York City: once considered the national epicenter in the fight against COVID-19, now health experts fear a Texas city has taken its place. Hospitals in Houston struggling to deal with the pandemic on a scale similar to that of New York City in late spring. Our conversation with New York Times reporter Dr.Sherri Fink. Also, a warning from climatologists about a coming drought that could reshape Texas for the long term. And getting schooled by Selena: a Texas University launches a first of its kind course. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 8, 2020

As Texas reports 10,000 new COVID-19 cases, the state education agency announces guidelines for going back to school in the fall, we’ll have details. Also, with unemployment high, the special struggle to keep up with demand for food in remote parts of west Texas. And Texas Senator John Cornyn claims the last top to bottom criminal justice review was more than half a century ago. Is he right? A Politifact check. Also a new documentary on a flamboyant fortune teller who became a cultural icon for many in Texas and beyond. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 25, 2020

As COVID-19 cases spike the governor hints at new local restrictions and millions of Texas parents and students remain in limbo for the fall, we’ll have the latest. Also, new visa restrictions the president says is designed to help American citizens looking for jobs during the COVID-19 economic downturn. Texas could take a major hit: we’ll hear how and why. And as demands grow for police reform, tech companies stepping in to help people monitor interactions with police. Also the beginning of the end for college admissions testing? All those stories and more today on the Texas Standard: