SB4

With the eclipse days away, this small city is more prepared than most

A plan will cap co-pays for state subsidized child care – how much of a difference will it make in stemming a childcare crisis?
On Wednesday, a federal appeals court heard the latest arguments over SB 4, Texas’ controversial new immigration enforcement law. In the meantime, where does the legal back-and-forth leave migrants?
Ennis, a North Texas town that attracts 100,000 visitors each April to see its bluebonnets, has an extra draw for tourists this year: It’s in the eclipse’s path of totality.
And: Why the Judd Foundation, named for Marfa’s most famous modern artist, is taking on Kim Kardashian in court.

An Indigenous perspective on the solar eclipse from a traditional healer

In a long-running securities fraud case against Ken Paxton, a deal has been reached that will let the attorney general avoid trial or an admission of guilt.
The U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral arguments today in what could be the most important case on reproductive rights since the Dobbs decision, this time on access to medication abortion.
Autonomous vehicles are getting a lot of bad press. Could smart roads pave the way to self-driving cars and trucks? A smart highway in Texas may put that to the test.
Marika Alvarado, who describes herself as a “direct descendant of generations of Medicine Women: traditional native healers of body, midwives and plant medicine,” shares her Indigenous perspective on the solar eclipse.
And: A UT San Antonio professor has dubbed the upcoming eclipse “the most profitable 22 minutes in Texas history.” Bulent Temel joins the show with more.

What you should know about polling going into election season

After a prolonged legal back-and-forth that ultimately saw it paused again, Texas Senate Bill 4 returned to the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals yesterday. We’ll have the latest on where the immigration law stands.
You’ve likely heard the poll numbers in the presidential race. Do you trust them? Some tips on following the many surveys we’ll be hearing as November approaches.
How community colleges are likely to play a growing role in the future of work in Texas.
And: Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton has sued to stop a light-rail initiative in Austin.

The latest on Senate Bill 4, which puts immigration enforcement in the state’s hands

The on-again, off-again hold on Texas’ controversial SB 4 immigration law is now back on, hours after the Supreme Court’s temporary green light. Stephen Vladeck of UT Law joins with the latest.
The Supreme Court will hear arguments today in a Texas case that has its roots in small-town petty politics. But it could have implications for the future of free speech and what’s known as qualified immunity.
Plus: revelations from an investigation into what really happened the night of a fire that killed 40 people at a migrant detention center in Juárez almost one year ago.

The Rio Grande is getting saltier. What’s that mean for agriculture?

The U.S. Supreme Court will weigh in on SB4, the controversial Texas law that allows state and local police to arrest and prosecute migrants who enter the state, after delaying implementation of the law last week.
A lack of medical insurance and access to treatment is making life in rural Texas tougher than many might imagine.
Energy insider Matt Smith has the latest on rising gas prices as many Texans hit the road for Spring Break.
The Rio Grande, the body of water that outlines the border between Texas and Mexico, is becoming saltier – affecting people, farmland and livestock on both sides of the border.
And: Amid a statewide teacher shortage, one Central Texas school district is trying to turn things around by creating its own pipeline of new recruits.

KUT Morning Newscast for March 11, 2024

Central Texas top stories for March 11, 2024. One Austin city manager candidate withdrew from consideration. TxDOT is taking public input on a possible road expansion in southwestern Travis County. U.S. Supreme Court will soon rule on whether Texas state troopers can arrest immigrants who cross into the U.S. Emergency communications for blind and deaf residents. Travis County Parks will start taking reservations today for next month’s total solar eclipse. Williamson County officials are preparing for an increase in visitors and traffic ahead of the total solar eclipse next month. Deep Eddy Pool in Austin is reopening today.

Supreme Court puts Texas’ immigration enforcement bill on hold

Senate Bill 4, which would allow Texas police to arrest people suspected of crossing the Texas-Mexico border illegally, is currently on hold after a ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court. The Texas Newsroom’s Julián Aguilar has the latest.
Why researchers and teachers are raising red flags over the state’s fully online STAAR tests for public school students.
A one-of-its kind 10K – with half its course in the U.S. and the other half in Mexico – drew hundreds of runners to El Paso.
And: The best U.S. coin design of 2023 features Jovita Idar, a journalist and activist from Laredo.

New music exhibit features iconic items owned by Willie Nelson, Taylor Swift and more

A new law making it a state crime for migrants to enter Texas without authorization faces a major test in a federal courtroom. We’ll hear the latest.

In Houston ISD, the biggest school district in the state, officials appointed by the state are getting pushback over plans to expand school reforms.

A Texas presidential museum turns a spotlight on Taylor Swift’s guitar, Willie Nelson’s boots and hundreds of other artifacts to help tell the story of American music.

Plus: The week in politics with The Texas Tribune.

KUT Morning Newscast for January 09, 2024

Central Texas top stories for January 09, 2024. Threats posed by severe winds. Austin officials say they’re not responsible for investigating the legal status of migrants. More information on the accused shooter from last month’s shootings in Austin and San Antonio. Some Williamson County residents are questioning the county’s ability to maintain groundwater supply amid drought.

What’s ahead for space exploration in 2024

The federal government takes legal action to stop Texas from implementing a new state law aimed at arresting migrants who come into the state illegally. Julián Aguilar of The Texas Newsroom has more.

A new plan to use AI to help explore the effect of burn pits on veterans.
Why 2024 could be the launch pad for a new chapter in space exploration.

How the armadillo, a dormant dog-sized mammal considered a pest by many, won the affection of many a Texan.

Plus: The week in politics with The Texas Tribune.

KUT Morning Newscast for January 04, 2024

Central Texas top stories for January 04, 2024. Texans can now submit applications to vote by mail. Texas immigration bill lawsuit. New study on medication abortions. How sharks in Australia can help us understand Texas.

The state 2D artist draws on his El Paso heritage

There haven’t been any votes yet, but we kind of already know what the Texas delegation to the U.S. House will look like in 2024.

The Israel-Gaza war is challenging what it means to have free speech at colleges across the country. A visit to a San Antonio campus highlights why.

Gov. Greg Abbott is set to sign into law a measure that makes illegal border crossing a state crime. What you need to know.

It’s tamale time for many folks across Texas. We’ll explore the base ingredient, masa, with our go-to taco journalist.

And a conversation with this year’s state 2D artist, Gaspar Enriquez, about how he depicts El Paso and what it means to be Chicano.

Texas Standard: April 8, 2020

If you’re a nonessential worker and you’re out for a drive, what happens if you get pulled over? The realities of police work during a pandemic. Today, our conversation with the chief of police of the Texas Capitol City on enforcement of stay at home orders, and how police are dialing back some of what they do to keep officers safe.. Also state parks and historic sites now shuttered. We’ll hear from the head of Texas Parks and Wildlife. Plus the boom in urban bear hunts: teddy bears that is. Some practical tips for first time hunters and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: December 4, 2018

A Texas Representative is leaving the state house’s ultra-conservative group. We’ll take a look at what the move could say about the upcoming Texas legislative session. Plus, the Texas Attorney General is accusing San Antonio’s police chief of violating the so-called sanctuary cities law. What happens now? And a Texas-based non-profit has been making big money housing immigrant children. A new investigation explores. Plus we’ll introduce you to U.S. Representative-elect Veronica Escobar. Why she says El Paso is the new Ellis Island. And we’ll take a look at a list of 31 of the most powerful people in Texas. You might be surprised. All of that and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 14, 2018

One of the most controversial laws to pass the Texas legislature in years: being upheld by a 5th circuit panel. What’s next for so-called sanctuary cities? We’ll explore. Also, Texas counties racing to join lawsuits challenging pharmaceutical companies over the opioid crisis. Why the race to the courthouse? And how Texas could make motherhood safer, and why the need is especially urgent. Plus, along the Harvey hit Gulf Coast this spring break, how’s business? We’ll check in with some bar, restaurants and other hot spots to hear whether the crowds are back and what’s changed. Those stories and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 23, 2017

Today marks the start of early voting across Texas, but for what? Never fear, we’ll have real world explanations of what’s up for grabs at the polls. Grab a pencil and a small piece of paper and play along as we decide how we’re gonna cast our ballots in the constitutional contests now officially underway. Also, Texas may be one of the top states for executions, but it also leads in exonerations. The price the state is paying for wrongful convictions. And the most powerful super computer at any university in the US is in Texas is about to become one of the nation’s fastest too. So why are they planning for its replacement already? Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard :

Texas Standard: September 26, 2017

Travis County’s Sheriff does a 180 after a ruling on Senate Bill 4. All ICE Detainers will be honored, but it’s not so simple. The status quo ante, the way things were before SB4. Is that what the court wants Texas to return to? We’ll try to sort out an opinion that’s left considerable confusion over the short term implementation of Texas’ so-called sanctuary cities bill. Also, remember the Texas Miracle? A piece in the New York times asks the question, Texas, you still feelin miraculous? And harvey sparks global interest in the concept of sponge cities. Like the suburbs, only extra absorbent. All that and a whole lot more on the national news show of Texas, the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 30, 2017

As a judge in San Antonio mulls the legality of a Texas sanctuary law, lawmakers in Washington take action on the federal level, we’ll have the latest. Plus Texas senator Ted Cruz said no to his fellow senate republicans. Now, he’s floating what he calls a compromise on health care. What’s the big idea, we’ll hear about it. Also cuts proposed for Amtrak, coming to a station near you?
And the battle over Keystone XL may not be over yet. This time the roadblocks not protesters but businesses. Those stories and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 27, 2017

A White House warning on Syria raises hackles in Moscow and eyebrows around the world. What’s behind last night’s announcement? We’ll explore. Also, drowned out by some of the bigger stories from the supreme court this week, a decision not to decide a case involving a high profile shooting at the border. We’ll loop back for a closer look. And a new law in Texas establishes a ‘right to try’ controversial stem cell treatments, but some worry it could be a green light for modern day snake oil salesmen. Those stories and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 26, 2017

The supreme court says it will hear the case of president Trumps travel ban, we’ll explore what this means in the meantime. Also republican holdouts in the senate hold up repeal and replacement of Obamacare. Today we talk with one of the most senior members of the US senate who’s task is turnaround the naysayers: senator John Cornyn joins us. Plus, Texas cities seeking sanctuary from the sanctuary cities bill make their case today before a judge in San Antonio. We’ll have the latest. And is Waco ready for its close up? Hollywood ramps up to revisit the Branch Davidian showdown. Plus how do you move a prairie dog? An expert tells us the secret: cheap dishwashing soap. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard: