Relief

Texas Standard: November 22, 2022

Texas has more residents without health insurance than any other state; now a Wall Street Journal investigation shows how obstacles are put in front of patients who would be eligible for financial aid. We’ll have more. And the US supreme court mulling a case out of Texas that involves Native Americans and foster care. Also, a new report on a nursing shortage in Texas. And what the city of Dallas is trying to do to cut down on street encampments. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

 

Texas Standard: January 4, 2022

As Texas students return to a post holiday footing some are finding it’s not ‘back to the classroom’ just yet. The latest pandemic spike punching holes in back to school plans. We’ll talk with a panel of education reporters with the latest from across Texas. Also, beef prices skyrocketing, but that money’s not making it back to Texas cattle ranchers. Now the Biden Administration’s stepping in: what Texas rancher’s have to say about the Feds’ new plan. And a new Texas law takes effect trying to put renters on an even footing with homebuyers when it comes to knowing if you live in a floodplain. All those stories and more today on the Texas Standard.

Texas Standard: July 1, 2021

Big news today from the U.S. Supreme Court. The case is out of Arizona but it will have big implications for Texans, we’ll explore. Plus an enormously energy-hungry industry is hoping to move to Texas. But our grid, as we found out in February, is not stable! We’ll learn more about cryptocurrency mining. And it’s been years since hurricane Harvey all but devastated Houston and it will still take some more years before some residents can move back home. Plus in a world with expiring car warranties, credit card scams and other attacks, the number one consumer complaint in the U.S. is for robocalls! What to do about them and ways to protect yourself. All of that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 21, 2021

Days after marking zero COVID-19 deaths, Texas hits a grim milestone. How will the state prioritize federal funding for pandemic relief? Also, state lawmakers get closer to passing the state’s two-year budget. We ask how schools will fare. Plus why opponents to Texas’ restrictive new abortion law may have trouble challenging it. And fewer people are being sentenced to death across the country, but a new report shows there may not be adequate defense for those facing life-in-prison sentences. And what the 50th anniversary of the dedication of the LBJ Presidential Library and Museum reveals about Texas then and now. Those stories and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 17, 2021

Much work still left to do before the gavel falls on the Texas legislative session. Reporters from the Houston Chronicle and the Dallas Morning News weigh in on what’s been done and what’s left to do in the final two weeks of the legislative session. Also millions of dollars to help stop evictions in Houston. Why aren’t all landlords taking the cash? And despite changes in policies under the new administration, transgender migrants stuck on the other side of the border. And something big brewing in Pennsylvania…now brewing in Texas, too? Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 12, 2021

A 15 billion windfall for Texas, relief funds much larger than the pandemic’s projected economic impact here. Where will the money go? Todd Gilman of the Dallas Morning News with more on how federal pandemic relief money could lead to raises for firefighters, infrastructure changes, and more. Also, the boom in the hispanic population in Texas. Does it equal political gains for the GOP? Arelis Hernandez of the Washington Post on how the numbers add up. And FDA approval for kids as young as 12 to to get vaccinated against COVID-19. How soon will shots be ready for Texas adolescents? Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 30, 2021

Where’d the 11 billion go? Now there’s a plan for federal pandemic aid money for Texas public schools. Emily Donaldson of the Dallas Morning News education lab on how badly needed federal aid will be distributed to Texas public schools. Also it’s election day tomorrow and one of the most talked about ballot measures in the state will be decided in Lubbock. How that city found itself at the center of the debate over abortion restrictions. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 7, 2021

The standardized STAAR test is set to go fully online soon statewide. But a glitch in testing this week has many wondering are we ready, or not? We’ll look at details. Other stories we’re tracking: the growing controversy over so-called vaccine passports quickly becoming a new culture war flashpoint. Are mandated certifications of vaccinations ethical? A closer look at some of the underlying considerations. And home prices skyrocketing in Texas cities, but if you’re thinking you can escape this trend by moving to rural Texas…think again. Also, the best chess team in the world? Look no further than the Rio Grande Valley. All of those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 5, 2021

We pretend to be a fly on the wall at the hearings where the failings of the state’s electric grid are being argued, we’ll have details. Also, did you know there’s money available for renters who are struggling? We tell you how to apply and hopefully how to get it. Plus, the good the bad and the ugly on vaccine distribution. And I bet you thought you knew everything there is to know about Selena Quintanilla. But as they say there’s always more to the story. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 14, 2020

A spike in COVID-19 cases in El Paso prompts the governor to send a surge of medical teams and equipment, we’ll have the latest. Plus, with early voting now officially underway, an overview of how to cast a ballot in Texas. And a claim that property crime is going up amid a cutback in the police department’s budget in the Texas capitol city. Politifact checks it out. Also tens of thousands of layoffs and furloughs: Texas based airlines send Washington an SOS and warn of greater turbulence ahead. And one of this year’s cover stories: the changing face of the American magazine. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 11, 2020

A prescription for Coronavirus relief? Congress hasn’t come up with it, and there’s a major political price that could be paid in Texas, too. Less than two months till election day and the message from constituents: we need relief from the economic effects of the pandemic. Politicians on both sides of the aisle say they get it, so where’s the relief package? We’ll explore. Also what’s in a name: the push to identify heatwaves as we do hurricanes. And American gothic reimagined in a Texas of today. The week in politics with the Texas Tribune and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 9, 2020

As many Texans struggle to make ends meet in a pandemic, politicians debate what sort of relief to offer. We’ll talk with Senator John Cornyn. Also, among the biggest cities in the US, residents of Houston appear to be facing the toughest challenges when it comes to personal finance and health. We’ll have details from a new survey by NPR and Harvard. Plus the politics of medicine amid a pandemic, how college campuses are trying to curb the spread amid rising COVID-19 numbers, the Fed changes its position on curbing inflation, what that might mean from most everyday folks and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 19, 2020

Bars, tattoo parlors and rodeos. What a return to normal is shaping up as in Texas as Governor Abbott moves to the next stage in reopening. Reopening dates vary by industry and rules aren’t being relaxed everywhere at once. Tony Plohetski of KVUE and the Austin American Statesman spells it out. Also, is the U.S. Government fast tracking child deportations? And why are so many small businesses having trouble getting promised aid? Plus the Hill Country spider that caught the attention of the Texas Supreme Court. Those stories and more today on the National News Show of Texas:

Texas Standard: November 12, 2019

The Texas connection in the impeachment inquiry. How two figures from the Lone Star State factor into tomorrow’s hearings on Capitol Hill. We’ll have the latest. Also, is the doctor shortage a phony crisis? A new Texas medical survey points to some big cracks in the conventional wisdom. Also, Bock wars break out in Shiner, Texas. We’ll hear about the three billboards fermenting anger among some locals. And what Ted Cruz and Kim Kardashian have in common, and what that could mean for the fate of a death row inmate. Those stories and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 17, 2018

The Commander is Chief wields a lot of power over U-S military action, but where do those powers begin and end? We’ll explore. Also, it’s been almost 10 years since Hurricane Ike devastated Galveston. But the city still hasn’t rebuilt much of the housing many depend on. And it’s been exactly 5 years since a fire and explosion at a Central Texas fertilizer plant killed 15 people and destroyed a large part of a small city. What’s been done to prevent another catastrophe like West, Texas? Also, Pulitzer prize-winning author Lawrence Wright’s new book hits shelves today. “God Save Texas” is all about the state he calls home, including what he describes as AM and FM Texas. Plus we’ll hear the argument for why it seems Texas lawmakers could have been drunk when writing the liquor laws. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 1, 2017

Governor Abbott goes hat in hand to capitol hill asking for billions in Harvey relief. What’s he brining back? We’ll have the latest. Also, you’ve heard about players not standing for the anthem at football games? Two high school students in Houston, both 17, refuse to participate in the pledge of allegiance. They say they’re being harassed at school because of it and now, there’s a federal case, we’ll hear about it. And why the selection of a Texan to the EPA science board has lots of environmentalists alarmed. Plus, a start up for startups, and the Japanese American soldiers who became Texas heroes. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 13, 2017

After repeated demands by democrats, a Texas lawmaker unveils articles of impeachment against President Trump. Now what? We’ll have the latest. Also, an army task force returns to Texas from Puerto Rico. We’ll hear what they encountered, and why the need for help isn’t likely to end any time soon. Plus, once it was hailed as a super principal for helping save a troubled school now she’s on suspension. A controversy that’s stunned the Houston community. And after a long fight to win UNESCO recognition for the Alamo, the president announces plans to pull out of the UN’s cultural wing, we’ll have the implications. Plus the week in politics with the Texas tribune and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 12, 2017

As Congress gets ready to approve hurricane aid money, governor Abbot sends a message to the Texas delegation: get a spine! We’ll hear why the governors so angry over the hurricane relief package set to a vote in the house. Plus, why lots of folks in hard hit Victoria are feeling left high and dry by relief efforts so far. And a win for opponents of solitary confinement in Texas and why some say it doesn’t go far enough. Plus outside a rural Texas town perhaps best known for kolaches: the first legal cannabis dispensary in the Lone Star state… not quite like those in California. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 20, 2017

7.1 on the Richter Scale: a deadly earthquake in central Mexico on the anniversary of a historic temblor. We’ll take you to Mexico city this hour. Also, the military plane is designated for TX and it could be a shot in the arm for you know where, we’ll have the story. Plus Ken Paxton says president Obama tried to confer citizenship status on daca recipients: Politifact Texas looks into that claim. And they say that news is the first draft of history. Now comes an important second draft you might say, with an exploration of a Texas reshaped by Harvey. Our conversation with the editor in chief of Texas monthly. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard: