politics

Texas Standard: February 26, 2021

The deregulated electric market was set up to save money for Texas consumers. So why did Texans end up paying $28 billion more? That story coming up on the Texas Standard.
A Wall Street Journal analysis shows the Texas electrical grid not only failed during the storm, but failed consumers for decades by leading to higher bills. We’ll hear what happened and why. Plus the latest on hearings by Texas lawmakers.
With a disaster declaration in Texas, what comes next? The nuts and bolts of accessing federal aid.
The University of Texas RGV in hot water for turning away eligible people seeking vaccines.
Plus the week in Texas politics and much more.

Texas Standard: February 19, 2021

Getting power back? Priceless. Losing power and heat and water and basic services? What price the winter storm of 2021? Coming up, the high price of being unprepared. Economist Ray Perryman on the difficulty calculating the impact of this week’s storm. Also, who should shoulder the costs of weatherizing power plants? According to the governor, it’s the taxpayer. We’ll hear more. And with power coming back and a lot of water damage its not too soon think about your own next steps: tips for talking to the insurance company, and a massive rescue of fellow Texas residents… But where do you shelter almost 5 thousand sea turtles? Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: February 12, 2021

It’s freezing out there. We’ll get a look at weather conditions across the state and what’s to come. We’ll also check in on how the state is weathering extended economic challenges posed by COVID-19. We’ll hear from the state’s top budget official. And the energy industry plays a part in that economic outlook. New proposals aim to tax some polluting practices. Plus a lesson in Texas border history that you might not be familiar with. And we’ll also wrap up the week in Texas politics and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: February 5, 2021

A new University of Houston Survey reveals a canyon in Texas separating the two parties over election fraud. In addition to those findings: fully a third of all Texans say they would not accept a COVID-19 vaccination. Kirk Watson of the Hobby School joins us to talk about the findings. Also, Elon Musk fighting gravitational forces in south Texas where its SpaceX vs the FAA. And how Texas is making an appearance of sorts in this weekends Super Bowl, the week in politics with the Texas Tribune and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 29, 2021

Could you draw a map of the state of Texas? Try drawing the political maps. This year, it promises to be tougher than ever. As redistricting begins in Texas, what to look for in what is likely to be another highly contentious process. Also, are you having trouble getting the COVID-19 vaccine? Many are. Our own Terri Langford set out to try to navigate the journey to get vaccinated in Texas, and it wasn’t pretty. We’ll hear what she learned firsthand. And the story of a Texas-based video game store stock that rocked Wall Street: a morality tale? The truths not quite so simple. All that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 25, 2021

And so it begins: the Attorney General of Texas files a lawsuit against the Biden administration over immigration enforcement changes. The story today on the Texas Standard.

Coming up- new findings on pregnancy and COVID-19. We’ll talk with a Texas-based maternal-fetal medicine specialist.

Also, should funding for Texas public schools be based on attendance, or enrollment? A democratic lawmaker calls for a shift from the former to the latter.

And, though the push for racial justice has brought down statues across the U.S., a new one is going up in College Station. We’ll hear from the student leading the push to honor a founding figure at Texas A&M.

Texas Standard: January 15, 2021

The November elections suggested it wouldn’t be business as usual at the state house, unless of course, lawmakers changed the rules, we’ll have details. Also, when republicans lost a key seat in the Texas senate, they lost their supermajority… a tool they’ve used to keep democrats from blocking their priorities. We’ll hear what a new rule change means for the status quo ante. And snow in Texas. Fun for kids, but farmers hope a harbinger of wetter and better days as they struggle with drought conditions. And the Latino voices of the pandemic in Texas. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 14, 2021

In a long list of unprecedented events theres another one. For the first time two of the three highest offices in the land will be lead by women. Women make better leaders in a time of crisis, so says the Harvard Business Review. We’ll tell you why. Plus, how are teachers taking current events and turning them into teachable moments? And how Texas Tech companies are pulling their dollars away from politicians. Plus, what’s going on with the COVID-19 vaccine? Stay tuned, it’s Texas Standard time:

Texas Standard: January 8, 2021

Will prominent Texas politicians who sided with unsubstantiated election fraud claims pay a price for that position after Wednesday? And what is a coup? It’s a question many Americans are asking about and arguing over after the invasion of the capitol. We’ll talk with a Texas scholar whose focus includes authoritarian regimes. And she’s one of the few health providers for miles around in a rural part of east Texas. And right now she’s overwhelmed with demand for vaccinations, we’ll talk with her. Also the impact of the pandemic on the future of Texas public schools, the week in Texas politics and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: December 31, 2020

No matter where you are we’ll bet you’re ready to say goodbye to 2020. This hour, the year in review in the Lone Star State. From extremes of partisan politics to a pandemic to protests and a reckoning over race…2020 will go down in history as a turning point for millions statewide and beyond. But what are the lessons of the past year and how might 2021 be different? Our roundtable with reporters. Also a shakeup at Fort Hood this year, one considered by many to be long overdue and some of the stories that didn’t make the front pages but nonetheless marked the end of an era. It’s a special year in review of the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: December 18, 2020

As families reunite for the holidays, worries grow for kids in the Texas foster care system. An update today on the Texas Standard.
In what sounds like a return to the worst days of the state’s foster care crisis, a new report finds foster kids sleeping in state offices. We’ll hear details.
Also, why a COVID-19 treatment being touted by state officials doesn’t seem to be making much of a dent in helping patients in one of the hardest hit parts of Texas
Oyez! Oyez!… oh boy! With the legislature set to reconvene, how’s this going to work with social distancing?
Plus, the week in Texas politics with the Texas Tribune and more.

Texas Standard: December 17, 2020

It’s being described as an act of cyber espionage so big it is hard to overstate its impact, and a Texas company is in the crosshairs. That story and more today on the Texas Standard.
Texas is distributing the COVID vaccine in tiers of priority. But what happens if someone tries to cut in line?
Also, the holiday shopping season’s not what it used to be and certainly not at the border right now, where Texas merchants are feeling the pressure from pandemic rules and a loss of customers from Mexico.
Also, the student debt crisis: is there a better alternative than loan forgiveness? We’ll hear about some of the options that could be on the table and much more.

Texas Standard: December 16. 2020

Senate leader Mitch McConnell congratulates Joe Biden on his election win. So why are many fellow republicans, including from Texas, staying silent? Today on the Texas Standard

As a movement to declare so called sanctuary cities for the unborn takes hold statewide, the push gets a major boost in Lubbock, the biggest Texas city to consider such a measure so far. We’ll hear all about it.

Also, 1.7 trillion and rising: the total amount of student debt currently owed. The President-Elect’s under pressure to offer student debt forgiveness–the first of a two part look at what that might entail. Also, a Politifact check and more.

Texas Standard: December 14, 2020

A big red letter day for Texas as the first COVID-19 vaccines roll into the Lone Star State. Where the vaccines are going and what happens next- today on the Texas Standard.
Four health care centers in Texas today set to receive the first batches of Pfizer’s just approved two-dose vaccine. How to find out who’s on top of the vaccination list and the latest on distribution.
He’s not green lighting a political career just yet, but he’s not ruling one out either. Actor and author Matthew McConaughey on the search for a middle ground. And reflections on the groundbreaking musical path of the great Charlie Pride.

Texas Standard: December 11, 2020

“Build the wall”. Those words that helped usher President Trump into office seem to still be guiding him as his time winds down- today on the Texas Standard.
We know the coronavirus pandemic will shape the upcoming Texas legislative session. Another hot topic will be medical marijuana. But how about casinos? Some will be betting big. Those pushing for much tighter restrictions on immigration often point to crime by unauthorized immigrants. But a new study packs a big challenge to those claims. We’ll hear from one of Texas’ top infectious disease experts on the path towards getting and distributing a COVID-19 vaccine. And we’ll circle back on some of the top political stories this week.

Texas Standard: December 9, 2020

“Deeply dysfunctional.” Part of the findings of an investigation of Fort Hood. We’ll look at actions taken — and what’s left undone. Today on the Texas Standard.
I’m Laura Rice in for David Brown. Learning during the pandemic. It’s been among the major challenges. So should it be business as usual when it comes to standardized tests?
Back to the ballot box. Some Texans are voting again. What the particularly contentious contest could tell us about the Texas Republican Party.
Plus, as the new Texas legislative session nears, we’ll examine a lawmaker’s claim on medical marijuana. And we’ll introduce you to the spider who saved Christmas.

Texas Standard: December 4, 2020

As hospital ICU units statewide again fill with COVID-19 patients, new restrictions are taking hold. Judge Clay Jenkins of Dallas county issues new orders curbing business activity, but admits it won’t be enough and calls on Texans to embrace a wartime patriotism to combat the virus. Our conversation with him coming up. Also, some Houston families in limbo as their loved ones remain locked up in Venezuela, the latest chapter in the story of the CITGO 6. And Selena returns to screen, this time with a distinctly Texan flavor, thanks to a producer who hails from The Valley. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 20, 2020

Is the presidential contest still a real contest? Texas’ senior senator says it’s still too close to call, we’ll have the latest. Also, he pledged to heal the soul of the nation, but when it comes to immigration, some wonder why that topic doesn’t make it too Joe Biden’s top 5 list of policy priorities. We’ll hear about the concerns of advocates of immigration reform. And airlines may be hard hit by the pandemic, but some Texas towns with ties to the skies are taking off. We’ll hear why. Plus the week in Texas politics with the Texas Tribune and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 17, 2020

As coronavirus numbers continue to surge in Texas – health care providers are desperate for resources and energy for the battle ahead. Today on the Texas Standard. We’ll check in with communities across the state about the specific challenges in their neck of Texas. Plus, how one Texas university has cracked down on compliance with COVID-19 prevention measures. It’s not without controversy. And, the Irving-based Boy Scouts of America facing an uncertain future after tens of thousands lobby sexual abuse allegations. Plus, some smart brains here in Texas have figured out we can investigate the very first stars. How? I’ll go ahead and say it — it’s pretty out of this world. Today on the Texas Standard.