Omar Gallaga

As Texas leads the nation in ‘family annihilation’ cases, what can be done?

Ken Paxton, the impeached attorney general, is headed for a Houston courtroom today on his 2015 securities fraud charges.

An update on wildfires across the state as firefighters brace for another tough day of heat and wind. We’ll hear where the fire threat is greatest and what to do to prepare.

Since 2020, Texas has emerged as the epicenter of “family annihilation” cases, in which someone kills at least two kinds of family members.

A new documentary traces the careers of two of Texas’ most famous musical siblings: Jimmie and Stevie Ray Vaughan.

And commentator WF Strong on what “Lonesome Dove “got right and wrong.

Booksellers sue Texas over law that will restrict school library books

On Capitol Hill, a former military officer-turned-whistleblower shares out-of-this world claims about UFOs and what he says the government’s hiding.

Following sex discrimination lawsuits over Texas’ border security crackdown, the state has started placing migrant women in state prisons as well.

The Austin school district is considering nearly doubling the size of its police department to comply with a new state law that takes effect in September.

A lawsuit by booksellers and publishers targets new book restrictions for Texas school libraries.

New research on Alzheimer’s finds Texas a hot spot, with border counties hit harder than the rest of the state.

And a women’s soccer champion from Georgetown weighs in on the women’s World Cup.

What did the Legislature accomplish for rural Texans?

The U.S. House approved a measure lifting the debt ceiling, but we’re not out of the woods quite yet.

As state lawmakers continue to tangle with the governor’s priorities, what actually was accomplished in the regular legislative session? A roundtable of Texas reporters looks at changes for rural Texans.

A federal district judge will hear arguments today on the future of DACA in a case brought by the attorney general of
Texas, who’s now been impeached and suspended. How much does that change things, if at all?

Also, they’re not just a time suck but a money pit, too: What can be done to cut the cost of meetings?

What are the weirdest laws in Texas?

At the Capitol, an intraparty rivalry between Republicans explodes into the open. The dueling charges between Attorney General Ken Paxton and House Speaker Dade Phelan are so personal and serious, some longtime Capitol watchers are characterizing the battle as among the most significant in Texas political history. Lauren McGaughey of the Dallas Morning news will have details.

After a scandal at a Bastrop foster care facility, Texas lawmakers pass two new bills to crack down on abuses.

We’ll have more on a vigil last night in Uvalde marking the one-year anniversary of the mass shooting at Robb Elementary.

The Texas Legislature will finish its session having made lots of new laws. But there are plenty of old laws on the books that seem pretty weird by today’s standards.

And debt collectors get a new high-tech tool.

Singer-songwriter Robert Ellis returns with new sound and perspective

Texas is on the brink of becoming the latest state to ban gender-affirming medical care for transgender minors.

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott asks the governors of other states to provide police and military forces to help secure Texas’ border with Mexico, as the numbers of reported unauthorized entries plummet.

Tech expert Omar Gallaga tells us about congressional hearings on regulating artificial intelligence.

And the musician formerly known as the Texas Piano Man sheds his fancy white suit and hat: Robert Ellis tells us how fatherhood and Fort Worth factor into his new release, “Yesterday’s News.”

Title 42 expires as border braces for migrants’ mass arrival

The end of an era, and the start of what could be a dramatic new chapter in the history of border and immigration policy. Title 42 ends at the stroke of midnight, and predictions of a period of chaos at the border are coming from President Biden on down. We’ll talk to someone on the front lines of providing shelter and food to migrants crossing into the U.S.

What rights does a fetus have in a post-Dobbs America? How the end of Roe v. Wade has states testing the limits of fetal personhood.

Nueces County charges ahead with plans for a new Tesla lithium refinery despite concerns about some of Elon Musk’s other big Texas projects.

Texas Standard: August 25, 2022

Are billions in school debt owed by Texans about to be written off the books? We’ll look at what President Biden’s announcement adds up to for Texans. Other stories we’re tracking: buying out of flood prone property: what it could mean for a region ravaged by Hurricane Harvey 5 years ago. Also after this weeks rains in North Texas, how the struggle’s just beginning for some families. And as housing prices skyrocket across Texas and many parts of the nation, military allowances not keeping up. And is the University of Texas about to pass Harvard as the country’s wealthiest university?Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 11, 2022

Multiple sources tell The Texas Tribune Governor Greg Abbott is exerting unprecedented control over who will lead the state’s power grid. Locked in a potentially tight reelection race and facing criticism over the grid’s 2021 collapse, we hear how the governor has put a stranglehold on the search for the operator’s CEO search. Plus the Biden Administration announced earlier this week it’s ending the controversial “Remain in Mexico,” program. What it means for migrants awaiting asylum hearings. All that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 28, 2022

18 billion in pandemic aid for Texas schools, a huge amount of money. So why has less than a third been spent? We’ll explore. Also with back to school just around the corner, many districts struggling to find and retain teachers. Will promises of a four day workweek do the trick? We’ll hear what educators and parents make of that approach. And five years after Hurricane Harvey, what researchers are finding out about a less obvious impact: the exposure to chemicals. Plus thousands of miles of new roads in Texas displacing hundreds of homes and businesses, but repeated findings of no environmental impact. A red flag? Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 5, 2022

With the Supreme Court now widely expected to overturn Roe vs. Wade, new numbers of where Texans stand on the issue of Abortion. From abortion to border security, the state’s population growth and the economy, Texans weigh in on a range of issues that could have a profound effect at the polls come November. Jim Henson with the results of a new survey by the Texas Politics Project. Also, Texas’ attempt to treat gender-affirming care as “Child Abuse”. A new report examines the underlying scientific claims being made by officials leading the push. Plus, say cheese, Texas: why a place better known for its beef is challenging dominant states in the dairy business. All this and then some today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 14, 2022

A crack in the governor’s crackdown on inspections of commercial border traffic. But the supply chain likely to remain tangled. We’ll have details. Also three top staffers for Harris County Judge Lina Hidalgo indicted in a contract award scandal. Why and what it might mean for a politician considered to be a rising star among Texas democrats. And a Texas university told it cannot charge out of state students more for tuition than undocumented students. What the decision could mean for colleges and universities statewide. Plus a case 75 years ago that shook the separate but equal status quo in Texas and beyond. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 31, 2022

A federal judge calls for an investigation into possible criminal charges of sex trafficking and pornography at a shelter for teens in Bastrop. Robert Garrett of the Dallas Morning News with more on an explosive hearing in a long running suit against the state’s foster care system. Also New Mexico prepares for marijuana tourists from Texas at that state’s laws on recreation pot change at the stroke of midnight. Angela Kocherga with the view from El Paso. And Texas’ role in the personal computer revolution. The unlikely story of the TRS-80, and the man behind it. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 6, 2022

Texans reflect on the anniversary of an event that many fear has called into question the future of American democracy itself. On the one year anniversary of the capitol insurrection, President Biden warns of the ongoing dangers to our democracy. Today, a conversation with representative Collin Allred of Dallas who was on the floor of the House that day and says the threat, rather than fading into history, remains. Also a reckoning for the role of Texans in that attack of January 6th 2021. Plus the Texas primaries as an acid test for Trump and the Republicans. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 11, 2021

While the Supreme Court considers Texas’ new abortion law, what appears to be the first hearing on SB8 in a state court. We’ll take a look at the potential impact. Other stories we’re tracking: more than a hundred noted Texas authors sign an open letter warning of book bans, censorship, and a threat to marginalized Texans. Plus virtual Reality, once primarily the province of gamers, becomes serious business helping seniors. Tech expert Omar Gallaga with more. And on this veterans day, a West Texas native reflects on his days in uniform, and then in the custody of the North Vietnamese. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 19, 2021

The Biden Administration recommends booster shots for many vaccinated Americans. We’ll take a look at who’ll get them first, why they’re needed and more of what we know about the latest push on the federal front to fight the spread of the Delta variant. Also, what Governor Abbott has made the center of his own pandemic strategy, and why. And a lawsuit that challenges what hospital employers can and can’t mandate. Plus, in our Tech Segment, Omar Gallaga on what the T-Mobile hack may mean for you. And a state lawmaker pushing for changes in virtual learning statewide. All those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 12, 2021

As some Texas Democratic lawmakers make their way back to Texas are there signs that the special session quorum break may be breaking up? How much longer can Texas democrats hold out? Also what some are calling a constitutional crisis looming over the budget. And with the rapid spread of the Delta Covid variant and back to school pressures, what we know and what we don’t know about the spread among kids. And more listener parents weigh in on what they plan to do about the return to school. All of that and then some today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 15, 2021

The quorum busting impasse at the capitol continues, and the Governor’s promising to arrest absent lawmakers. Governor Greg Abbott joins us today. Texas House Democrats say their decision to leave the capitol and break up a quorum was a last ditch effort to stop restrictive changes to voting laws. Governor Abbot promising to keep calling special sessions until lawmakers come back and calling to question the character of Texas House Democrats. Also a lawsuit filed this week against new abortion restrictions set to take effect in Texas on September first, we’ll explore what’s at stake. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 22, 2021

Six weeks to go and the race is on. A big budget battle set at the Texas capitol today, as the clock ticks toward the end of the session. From changes to Texas abortion laws to voting laws, to what to do about power in the wake of February’s massive blackouts and more… Where do we stand on a huge range of issues lawmakers are considering under the pink dome?We’ll get up to speed. Plus Representative Joe moody on a bipartisan package for criminal justice reform. And our own Kristen Cabrera on federal efforts to help Texans who’ve already suffered from the loss of a loved one due to COVID-19 cover the costs of interment. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 15, 2021

The governor claims we should be very close to herd immunity. What does the chair of the Texas vaccine allocation panel have to say? About 25 percent of Texans now reported to be vaccinated… far from what public health experts have estimated is needed for herd immunity. We’ll hear more. Also a turning point in what’s been called the eternal war and why some have lingering concerns about plans to get the U.S. out of Afghanistan by 9/11. And in a state that leads the nation in fatal crashes involving large trucks, a bill rolling thru the state house that would make it harder for people to sue trucking companies. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 8, 2021

As federal officials add new detention centers for young migrants, the states of Texas and Louisiana sue over changes to immigration policy. We’ll have details. Also, the nation’s top homeland security official returns to Texas today as the numbers of migrants swell along the southern border. Richard Pineda of UT El Paso on how the politics of immigration may be blurring the picture of what’s really happening. And those boots are made for talking, the fashion editor of Vogue magazine on a Texas accent in haute couture. And what’s the real capitol of Texas? You sure? A Houston Chronicle writer makes the case it’s not Austin. Those stories and so much more coming up today on the Texas Standard: