Mass Shooting

Texas Standard: August 4, 2020

New numbers on COVID-19 testing in Texas tell us what, exactly? An investigative report by the Houston Chronicle says many Coronavirus test results are not included in official counts trying to chart the spread of COVID-19. We’ll hear why not and what it means for efforts to stem the spread of the virus. Also, El Paso students reflect on the deadliest attack on Latinos in modern U.S. history, one year on. And newsman Dan Rather on a plan to improve education. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 11, 2019

What could be one of the most consequential Supreme Court cases this term, affecting tens of thousands of people in Texas. The nation’s highest court set to hear arguments over DACA, the program that protects some 700 thousand people from deportation. President trump’s tried to unravel it. We’ll look more closely at what’s at stake. Also, is Mexico taking a page from president Trump’s policy toward migrant families? Separation south of the border. And what does it mean to get good at responding to mass shootings? All of those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 4, 2019

Julian stays in, but Beto says bye bye: a shakeup among democrats in the race for the White House. We’ll look at why and what it adds up to. Also, Patrick Svitek of the Texas Tribune with more on a Texas departure from the presidential race. And two Texas republicans weigh in on the GOP’s Texas sized problem heading into 2020. Plus oil prices falling, can Texas retain its crown as energy king? A new energy mix may help it do just that. All of that and then some today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 13, 2019

Democratic Presidential contenders duke it out in Houston. Who fared well and who didn’t? We’ll take a closer look. Other stories we’re tracking: whether recent mass shootings in El Paso and Odessa could mark a turning point for Texas. Also 20 years after a Texas church shooting, a remarkable story of healing. Plus Ken Burns rosins up the bow for a major public TV documentary, this time on country music. And the week in Texas politics and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 12, 2019

The President’s plan to dramatically cut the numbers of asylum seekers in the U.S. gets the green light from the U.S. Supreme court, at least temporarily. We’ll have the latest. Also, Texas back in the spotlight on the national political stage once again as Democrats descend on Houston for tonight’s round three of that party’s presidential debates. And confusion in Texas and elsewhere when it comes to kids and vaping. We’ll try to get some answers from the commissioner of state health services. Plus the legacy of T. Boone pickens and remembering Daniel Johnston. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 5, 2019

Hate Will Not Define Us: it’s become a rallying cry in El Paso in the hours after one of the deadliest mass shootings in history. As we continue to track other stories making news on this Monday, much of our broadcast is devoted to the aftermath of Saturday’s devastating mass killing at an El Paso Walmart. What we know definitively, how the city is coming together, and how El Pasoans intend to move forward. We’ll hear from reporters with long ties to the region, and how the unfolding of this incident on social media may send warnings about how we talk about such incidents in the future. That and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 27, 2018

As visions of gift shopping danced in our heads, a report on climate released by the Feds. What does it tell us about how Texas may have to adjust? Political recriminations over the timing of the mandatory report on the economic impact of climate change. After having had a chance to review it, what’s it telling Texas? We’ll take a closer look. Also, should the U.S. be worried about a collapse in the housing market? The Wall Street journal singles out a Texas city as a worrisome canary in the coalmine. And who were the first Texans? Why Researchers are rethinking their answers with a discovery near Salado. Those stories and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 29, 2018

As a nation reels in the aftermath of a synagogue shooting in Pittsburgh, congregants gather in Sutherland Springs to reflect on what happened there a year earlier. Also, as texans continue to set records at the polls, political experts keep talking about the so-called sleeping giant. But a case can be made that there’s a better metaphor for the power of the Hispanic vote in Texas. We’ll hear about that. Plus the Army Corps of Engineers and the Texas general land office pushing a massive multi-billion dollar plan to put a wall between part of the Texas gulf coast and the next major storm. All that and then some today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 24, 2018

Can schools identify violent students before they commit mass murder? After Santa Fe, the mental health of students in the spotlight. Governor Abbott’s roundtables on gun violence after the Santa Fe High School massacre getting national attention. Now the governor is calling on mental health screening programs to identify would-be mass murderers, we’ll have more. And a clean water shortage in hurricane ravaged Puerto Rico: how Texas is coming to the rescue. And the end of an era at the University of Texas El Paso: our conversation with the outgoing president, once named one of the 50 world’s greatest leaders. And epic low turnout at the polls: what does this tell us about Texas politics? Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 7, 2018

Decision day on the horizon for the controversial arms deal with Iran. Could there be collateral damage? We’ll explore. Also, the party’s over for the NRA in Dallas. What was said, and left unsaid in the wake of the national convention. Plus: e-scooters scattered about the streets of a growing number of cities. There are benefits to be sure, but cities wrestle with whether they outweigh the costs. And hundreds arrested, no one yet convicted We’ll have an update on the Waco biker trials. Also big changes for hundreds of thousands of insured Texans who may be on the hook for 100 percent of ER charges. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 28, 2018

A controversial change already facing a legal challenge: how might Texas be affected by a new citizenship question in the next US census? We’ll explore. Also, five months after a massacre in Sutherland Springs, church officials announce new plans to rebuild, we’ll hear the latest. And what if you could compare the earnings potential of one college degree against another? Despite a federal ban on collecting such data, Texas’ flagship university is doing the numbers, we’ll explore the implications. And it was James Dean’s final film, and a larger than life commentary on Texas as a microcosm of America. The editor of Kirkus Review calls a new book the definitive account of the movie ‘Giant’. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 20, 2018

North of San Antonio, an explosion at a federal express facility raises new challenges in the investigation of Austin’s serial bomber. Also joining us, the head of the House Homeland Security Committee Texas congressman Michael McCaul on the federal response to the bomb attacks in the Texas capitol city. Also, is Mexico finally getting the upper hand on the drug cartels? We’ll explore some new developments that have put the question back on the table. And a pedestrian in Arizona killed by a self driving car: should we tap the brakes on the development of autonomous vehicles? Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 1, 2018

From a crisis in Teacher Retirement to the never ending Twin Peaks saga, a massacre in south Texas and a hurricane named Harvey. This hour, its all things reconsidered as we look back in the rearview at the top stories in Texas in 2017. From a historic storm that literally and figuratively forever altered the landscape of the lone star state, to the hometown heroes whose hollywood ending brought smiles to Harvey hit Houston. There there was something called the bathroom bill, remember that? A surprise resignation among the top three most powerful Texas lawmakers and much more…your picks for top Texas news in 2017:

Texas Standard: December 6, 2017

No democrat has been elected to statewide office since 1994. But the state’s first openly Gay Hispanic Sheriff says she’s ready to be Governor. It had been rumored that Dallas county sheriff Lupe Valdez was mulling a bid to challenge Governor Greg Abbott, but now that the shoe has dropped. Do Democrats have a serious contender? We’ll explore. Also, a Texas police department takes aim at the Grinch offering an alternative to leaving holiday parcels on the front porch. And it started in Chicago, got revived in Austin, and has gone global: the story of the real life roller derby queens. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 16, 2017

In the wake of Sutherland Springs, should congregants be allowed to carry firearms? Hundreds respond to a Texas church security summit, we’ll have the latest. Also, at Texas prisons its being described as a mass exodus of guards. We’ll hear how bad it is and what’s behind it. File under sign of the times: what do you call it when someone lies by, telling the truth? Why a word with roots in the 16th century is making a comeback in 2017. Plus attention investors: want some partisanship to go with that portfolio? A new way the industry’s blending business and politics. And it’s happened to us all: we’ve run out of Velveeta and Rotel. In queso emergency, the homesick Texan’s got you covered. All that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 10, 2017

In Beijing today, the President trumpets ‘America first’, but how are they gonna pay for that down on the farm? A rural reach, we’ll explore. Also, could the US government be legally liable to the survivors of those killed in the church attack at Sutherland Springs? A law professor makes the case. Plus, as Texans reach out to help that community, a warning on scams. And should there be a statue honoring Texan Agnes Driscoll? Don’t feel bad if you don’t know the name, you soon will. The story of the unsung heroines of World War II, the codebreakers. And a remembrance of San Antonio’s King of Nachos, the week that was in Texas politics and much more coming up today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: December 4, 2015

Now it’s beginning to look a bit like a grudge match over Syrian Refugees- Despite a legal challenge to Syrian refugees, no let up from the Feds. You’ve no doubt heard that there’s been as many mass shootings as days in the year…are you so sure? We’ll do the numbers. And Californian’s used to brag about See’s Candies…is there a Texas corollary? There is and it just turned a hundred and thirty. We’ll get a taste if we’re lucky. And what some say is a way to improve education statewide. Here’s a hint: monkey bars might be involved. Those stories and lots more on todays Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: December 3, 2015

The shooting in San Bernardino: what’s it really about and what does it say about society? Are you so sure? Coming to conclusions, today on the Texas Standard. As the world follows the So Cal massacre, Texas goes to court against the Obama administration—the issue: Syrian refugees. And states across the nation are watching. Plus inventors: got an idea? Patent it? Then come to Texas to protect it. But where does this leave those who actually bring new ideas to life? The patent troll reconsidered. Also as oil prices drop, crime goes up…in some parts of Texas way up. Those stories and lots more on todays Texas Standard: