Marfa

With the eclipse days away, this small city is more prepared than most

A plan will cap co-pays for state subsidized child care – how much of a difference will it make in stemming a childcare crisis?
On Wednesday, a federal appeals court heard the latest arguments over SB 4, Texas’ controversial new immigration enforcement law. In the meantime, where does the legal back-and-forth leave migrants?
Ennis, a North Texas town that attracts 100,000 visitors each April to see its bluebonnets, has an extra draw for tourists this year: It’s in the eclipse’s path of totality.
And: Why the Judd Foundation, named for Marfa’s most famous modern artist, is taking on Kim Kardashian in court.

Texas Extra: Adventures and misadventures of a cinematic life

Carolyn Pfeiffer literally wrote a book, “Chasing the Panther,” about her life and, as she puts it, her “adventures and misadventures” in the worlds of cinema and music and so much more. This extended version of her story includes her time in 1950s New York City, a wild hair story involving Fellini’s “8 1/2” and an unforgettable recollection about a train scene in “Doctor Zhivago.”

Exploring the difficulties of rural reproductive care in West Texas

Texas leads the nation in executions again, and Harris County sentences more people to die than any other county in the U.S. A new report examines dozens of death penalty cases there.

A new podcast from Marfa Public Radio looks at the challenge of accessing reproductive care in the Big Bend region.

The season started out with great expectations, but now the San Antonio Spurs have lost a record 18 games in a row. What’s gone wrong, and can it be fixed?

Plus, the week in politics with the Texas Tribune’s Ayan Mittra.

Latinos now make up largest share of state’s population

For the first time since the mid 1800s, the biggest population group in Texas is not white – it’s now Hispanic.
The San Antonio Spurs officially chose Victor Wembanyama with their No. 1 draft pick Thursday night, and he’s been welcomed with open arms by a city ready to win NBA Championships again.
There’s a push and pull in some Mexican restaurants across Texas between a culture of machismo and one of celebrating flamboyant musician Juan Gabriel.
Texas-born singer-songwriter Jess Williamson joins us to talk about her latest album, “Time Ain’t Accidental,” her writing process and Marfa influences.
Plus, a wrap-up of another tumultuous week in Texas politics.

Texas Standard: September 30, 2022

The first and so far only gubernatorial debate in Texas set for tonight. Greg Abbott the incumbent republican and democratic challenger Beto O’Rourke square off tonight in the Rio Grande Valley. Sergio Martínez-Beltrán of the Texas newsroom with what to look for. Also despite democrats’ high hopes, Alex Samuels of the 538 writes for democrats to succeed in Texas, they need more than Beto. We’ll hear her analysis. And after a long campaign, a long segregated schoolhouse in Marfa approved for national historic site status. The long fight for recognition, the week in politics and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 22, 2022

A priority, she says, is doing something about the disappearance of rural hospitals. So why does she want to be Texas’ next agriculture commissioner? Today, we meet Susan Hays, the democrat trying to unseat the incumbent republican. Also they used to be considered inexpensive, modest, though iconic structures. Why adobe homes in Marfa and other parts of West Texas are at the center of a political fight. And a retail store in Frisco inspires a countdown and lines to get in on opening day. Any guesses what the name of that store might be, fellow Texans? Those stories and much more coming up today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: December 3, 2021

The Trump era policy for asylum seekers to resume after talks between the Biden administration and officials in Mexico. The so-called remain in Mexico program is coming back, despite promises of change. We’ll hear why. Also the push to preserve the history of a formally segregated school in West Texas. And El Paso’s ban on planting Mulberry trees. Now that the existing ones are dying off, what will take their place? Plus the week in Texas politics with the Texas Tribune, and remembering the Texan getting tons of attention right now for his role in keeping the fab four together. All that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 17, 2020

In the great tourist towns of Texas, it’s far from fun and games this weekend. From the Gulf Coast, Hill Country and Big Bend, how tourist towns are coping with COVID-19. Plus a double hit to small businesses in Texas’ already economically disadvantaged latino communities. And you’ve got questions? Dr Fred Campbell’s got answers. Our go to expert from UT Health San Antonio fields listener concerns about the Coronavirus. Plus a Texas salute to American singer songwriter John Prine. Those stories plus the week in Texas politics with the Texas Tribune and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: December 26, 2019

The most powerful factor in the Texas economy? Energy. This hour, we’ll explore how changes out west are affecting the entire landscape of the Lone Star State. They used to call it the fracking boom. New technologies that made it possible to extract more oil and gas from the ground. Texas’ Permian Basin has become the most productive patch of petroleum development in the U.S. leading some to suggest the endless cycle of boom and bust may be over. What happens in west Texas affects us all, so what’s next? That’s our focus in Untapped: a Special Edition of the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 14, 2019

A time for reflection and healing as El Paso holds a city-wide memorial service for the 22 victims of the August 3rd mass shooting. We’ll have the latest. Other stories were watching: two incidents half a world away. How protests in Hong Kong and an explosion in the arctic circle could have ripple effects for the Lone Star State. Also, a tale of two governments fighting HPV. How a nation with a population and economy the size of Texas is beating the Lone Star State, and what we might learn. All of that and then some today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 12, 2019

A push for teacher pay raises, but what about other state workers? State employees take to the streets in protest, we’ll have the latest. Also, the student government at Texas State university votes to ban a conservative student group. What the president of Texas State has to say about allegations of an attempt to curb conservative speech at the university. And there’s Lollapalooza, there’s ACL fest, and a new music festival for west Texas? Many locals say not so fast. Plus the week in Texas politics with the Texas Tribune and a whole lot more today on the Friday edition of the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: February 7, 2019

A new migrant caravan reaches the border with Texas and president Trump puts more boots on the ground, we’ll have the latest. Also, political strategies are adapting to a changing Texas. With all eyes on 2020, is the GOP scared? Or is recent rhetoric simply a plan to turn out the faithful? And from plastic to metal: the switch that could bring 3D printing into a whole new dimension. Also, the artist who consistently delivers billions of views on YouTube, you may remember Gasolina, Dura and Despacito. We’ll look at his formula for success and so much more on today’s Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 22, 2019

When a suspect dies in police custody in Texas, what’s the public’s right to get answers? Critics call it the dead suspect loophole. We’ll take a closer look. Also coming up this hour, a military uprising in Venezuela. Four officials are kidnapped before troops loyal to the president put it down. A coup in the works? What might it mean for the region, and for Texas? And as some kids from Marfa get their school projects ready for a literal launchpad, a Texas researcher takes a lead position in crafting a roadmap for the next decade of space research. We’ll meet him and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 2, 2019

More migrants sprayed with tear gas as money for a border wall remains at the center of the government shutdown. We’ll have the latest. Also, the measure to allow Texans to donate to address the huge backlog of untested rape kits passed with bipartisan support. But now it’s reached a real-world roadblock, we’ll tell you why. Many who live in the Big Bend area have spent their whole lives there, except for their last days. The challenge of access to hospice care. Plus debunking myths about mental health, the country band bringing two Texas towns together and what an onion says about this year’s forecast. All that and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 1, 2018

The latest Texas Lyceum Poll is focused on the mid-terms. Republican incumbents have big leads except for one. Texas Senator Ted Cruz has found a true challenger in Representative Beto O’Rourke, but will the two debate and will it matter? We’ll explore. Also, the Port of Corpus Christi has some big plans for some big ships to move a LOT of oil across the way from Port Aransas. We’ll take a look at what the people of Port A think about the proposal. And if you’ve got a kid in your life quick question: have they spent much time outside this summer? A guide to help parents navigate in a world full of tech. Plus will we finally unravel the mystery of the Marfa Lights? You’ll have to listen on today’s Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 2, 2018

From Dalhart to Dumas, San Antonio to San Angelo, Houston, Tyler, Marfa, College Station and all across the lone star nation no matter where you are, it’s Texas Standard time. Governor Abbott used to take delight in filing lawsuits against the Obama administration, so why’s Texas suing the Trump administration? You may be surprised by the answer. Also, the capitol city has a plan to mandate paid sick leave for businesses within city limits. That’s sparked a legal battle with businesses owners and the state, we’ll explore. And imagine 10 years with tap water so poisonous, you won’t dare drink it or bathe in it. A south Texas town fights back. Plus a 200 percent increase in heroin snagged at the border? a fact check and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: February 22, 2018

Governor Abbott is not having it: schools need to implement safety measures or be be called out publicly, we’ll explore. Also, the reverend, crusades, and the role Texas played in all this. Plus, presidential Elections are coming up in Mexico: what’s different from US elections? And in Texas how do you become “election judge”? We’ll tell you. Also, the tug of war for the “rainy day fund”, could it pay for flooding? Plus boots that sustain the soul and a tech giant that’s house hunting. All that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 26, 2018

The pot is sweetened: a proposed path to citizenship for 1.8 million. But is the overall flavor of the deal too terrible for many lawmakers? We’ll explore. Plus, the hub of Harris County’s criminal justice system has been closed because of Hurricane Harvey flooding, and could be for years to come. And in Marfa a secretive company opens up to school kids. And in Montreal NAFTA negotiations that could have big effects on Texas. All that plus the Typewriter Rodeo and a wrap of the week in Texas politics, today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 16, 2017

Once the bete noire of Texas Republicans, the EPA is in regulatory rollback mode. What does this mean for Texans? We’ll explore. Also, sometimes what regulations won’t do, economics will: as folks living near two coal fired power plants are discovering. The small town of Rockdale reckons with its future. And while another, in far west Texas, continues to transform into something few locals would have ever expected: Marfa, reconsidered. Those stories and lots more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 18, 2017

In a place where there’s little water already, rising demand raising the stakes for everyone. We’re live from Marfa Public Radio today! Also, he may have hit a wall with congress, but President trump is moving fast to make a lasting mark on another front, and Texas is ground zero. Tilting the balance on the federal bench. And just a few miles from here they’re warming up the famous Mcdonald observatory telescopes as the US prepares for a rare solar eclipse. But why’s this one so special, and for researchers, what left to learn? And sine die for the special session, the week in Texas politics and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard: