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Daniel Fears: “Home” (Live from the Draylon Mason Music Studio)

Happy Juneteenth! While it’s now a national holiday, it’s always been a celebration here in Texas, where historically Black hubs like Houston were notified of the Emancipation Proclamation and the Civil War’s end later than the rest of the states.

And it’s Houston that gave us our July 2021 Artist of the Month Daniel Fears. We’ve already gushed about Daniel a ton, chiefly around his Frank Ocean-esque vocals, sophisticated sense of liquid R&B sonics, and seamless transitions between trombone and piano. These days Daniel’s a household name all on his own, but that couldn’t’ve happened without all his time spent as brass-for-hire in the neo-classical circuit.

That neo-classical element recently had a real full circle moment with the release of Close To Home a couple weeks back. Recorded live at KMFA’s Draylon Mason Music Studio, this six-song session presents Fears’ passionate compositions in an unforgettable, all-acoustic and unplugged orchestral way, one that simultaneously emphasizes Daniel’s individual talents as well as the importance of thorough, thoughtful arrangements. Well, just in time for Juneteenth, there’s a screening of If They Took Us Back (the score for which Daniel contributed to) alongside a special solo concert appearance 7PM tonight at The Paramount Stateside.

That said, if the high chance of thunderstorms has you considering couch lock for this evening, transport the Draylon Mason Music Studio to your living room stereo with the Close To Home cut of “Home”. Because everyone has the right to feel at home, no matter who they are.

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