FEMA

Who pays for Texas highways?

After spring storms drenched Southeast Texas, the state is offering to buy out flooded homes. Why some are saying no thank you.
Early voting is underway for primary runoffs, and Gov. Greg Abbott’s battle over school vouchers continues as he backs candidates against those who oppose his plan.
A look at how the military trains for tunnel warfare.
Domestic production of EV batteries is ramping up in the U.S. – but EV sales have been down in recent months as consumers opt for hybrids or gas-powered cars that often cost less and offer more choices.
And with summer travel season ahead, have you wondered who’s paying for Texas highways?

Texas Standard: January 5, 2022

As COVID-19 cases bring hospital ICU’s to capacity statewide, FEMA now saying help is on the way. But will it be enough? Today, our conversation with Tarrant County Judge Glen Whitley on the challenges they face during this latest spike in cases. Also, Governor Abbott announces another lawsuit against the Biden Administration, this time over vaccination mandates for Texas National Guard troops. Plus a new years cold snap, a plunge in energy production, and a huge release of pollutants. What an incident last weekend tells us about Texas’ energy industry and readiness for the next freeze. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 22, 2021

Six weeks to go and the race is on. A big budget battle set at the Texas capitol today, as the clock ticks toward the end of the session. From changes to Texas abortion laws to voting laws, to what to do about power in the wake of February’s massive blackouts and more… Where do we stand on a huge range of issues lawmakers are considering under the pink dome?We’ll get up to speed. Plus Representative Joe moody on a bipartisan package for criminal justice reform. And our own Kristen Cabrera on federal efforts to help Texans who’ve already suffered from the loss of a loved one due to COVID-19 cover the costs of interment. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: February 12, 2021

It’s freezing out there. We’ll get a look at weather conditions across the state and what’s to come. We’ll also check in on how the state is weathering extended economic challenges posed by COVID-19. We’ll hear from the state’s top budget official. And the energy industry plays a part in that economic outlook. New proposals aim to tax some polluting practices. Plus a lesson in Texas border history that you might not be familiar with. And we’ll also wrap up the week in Texas politics and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 28, 2020

Election day is just around the corner. We’ll start the show with what you need to know here in Texas to make sure your vote is in on time. And we’re watching some U.S. House races that could be up for grabs. There’s been a lot of attention on historically red seats going blue, but at least one Democratic incumbent also appears vulnerable. And we’ll also turn our sights away from election talk for an update on something else with long-term effects on the state: coastal flooding and how a new policy change could impact how we prevent it. And we’ll fact-check a claim about Texas taxes and business regulations. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 13, 2018

Hurricane Florence bears down on the Carolinas. But closer to home, officials in south Texas claim after flooding there they got stiffed by FEMA, we’ll have the latest. Also, we thought there are big discrepancies in health care for minorities, but now the agency examining those inequities nixed. We’ll hear why and what it means. And a year after a major quake in Mexico city killing more than 300: a new report blames corruption for many of the buildings that toppled. We’ll have details of the investigation. Plus tighten those crash helmets: Texas cities on a collision course with electric scooters. Those stories and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 4, 2018

April 4th 1968: a date that changed America. 50 years on, how do texans remember the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr.? Two weeks before, a choir from Prairie View A&M performed before Martin Luther King at the Lorraine Motel where King was assassinated. 50 years later, we talk with the leader of that choir and his brother who led a reenactment of the event in Memphis. Also, the only African American owned bank in all of Texas expands to Atlanta. We’ll hear about the history of the bank and why they’re moving beyond Texas borders. And a ruling in a challenge to Texas motor voter laws. Those stories and so much more today at the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 3, 2018

It’s being described as an eye popping boost for Beto O’Rourke’s bottom line: a game changer in his race against Ted Cruz for senate? We’ll explore. Also, there’s more teacher walkouts over pay, now in Oklahoma and Kentucky. Should Texas teachers be taking a cue? We’ll explore. Also, tariffs hit home. How china’s reaction to U.S. trade policies are making a mark on the Texas economy. And clinical trials of new alzheimer’s treatments haven’t been going well. Now researchers in San Antonio may have discovered the reason. Plus, will you get your next car by subscription? Why some automakers are disrupting their own sales model. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: December 8, 2017

A group committed to boosting prospects for democratic women calls on the resignations of two prominent state senate democrats. In a season of sexual harassment scandals, new allegations against state senators Boris Miles and Carlos Uresti are the talk of the Texas capitol city. Both men deny the charges. We’ll hear from the person who reported the story, as well as a fellow state senator calling for reform of how sexual harassment cases are handled. And a legal scholar who says the implications go directly to a larger cultural problem at the capitol. All of that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 12, 2017

As Congress gets ready to approve hurricane aid money, governor Abbot sends a message to the Texas delegation: get a spine! We’ll hear why the governors so angry over the hurricane relief package set to a vote in the house. Plus, why lots of folks in hard hit Victoria are feeling left high and dry by relief efforts so far. And a win for opponents of solitary confinement in Texas and why some say it doesn’t go far enough. Plus outside a rural Texas town perhaps best known for kolaches: the first legal cannabis dispensary in the Lone Star state… not quite like those in California. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 12, 2017

Theres gotta be a better way: a top official in Houston says the whole region needs to rethink flood preparation to adjust to a new normal, we’ll have the story. Also: what’s in the water? Residents of Harvey hit Texas want to return to their homes and many have, but experts are concerned about high levels of toxic chemicals still standing in the water. We’ll explore what residents know and don’t know about the dangers. And after the controversy over a pro football player taking a knee in protest during the national anthem, the head of the National Basketball Association is encouraging its players to speak out on special issues. Why the difference in approach? We’ll talk to a former NFL coach. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard: