Federal

Texas Standard: September 28, 2020

With almost two weeks to go before the first ballots are cast in Texas for the general election, a court decision that could change the rules for voters. A federal court tosses new rules against straight ticket voting and the state attorney general plans an appeal. We’ll hear what the impact could be for Texas voters. Also, Governor Abbott’s not on the ballot, but in a special election set for tomorrow his pandemic policies are front and center, exposing a deepening rift among republicans. And a rare voice on radio marks a golden anniversary: the Texas-based In Black America and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 22, 2020

The state’s largest school district has plans to start the year online and could extend that a little more. Houston ISD’s interim superintendent joins us to talk about the weight of planning this school year. We’ll also hear from teachers who are frankly afraid for themselves and their families, but also love being in the classroom. And a Texas law expert joins us to parse out exactly what’s going on with federal agents arresting people in Portland. Plus a harrowing story about COVID-19 and Texas ICE detention centers. That and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 6, 2019

The Governor promised action, now 8 executive orders aimed at reducing gun violence. But do they go far enough? We’ll take a closer look. Also, money for a border wall? Where’s it coming from? In part, from military projects in Texas. Also a former state musician with a new release: musical, yet this one’s more a treat for the eyes. Plus the week in Texas politics and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 26, 2019

After an unofficial moratorium, a revival of the federal death penalty. The protocol they plan to use mirrors the Texas model, we’ll have more. And: Texans with ties to Puerto Rico ask what’s next after the resignation of the territorial governor. Many are wondering where the movement that led to his ouster goes from here. Also: UT San Antonio gets tapped to boost research on battlefield trauma care in hopes of helping veterans. Plus: The week in Texas politics and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 15, 2019

The nation’s first execution of 2019 is set for today. But it won’t happen. The Texas court of criminal appeals orders a second look at bite mark evidence used in a murder trial, we’ll have more. Also, the political committee behind the upset victory of democratic congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez has a new objective: to topple a veteran congressman from Texas who’s a fellow democrat. We’ll hear why. Plus, is the shutdown saving the government money? An expert does the math and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 4, 2019

U.S. Representative Will Hurd of Texas is a Republican but he sided with Democrats yesterday in a vote to reopen the government. We’ll ask him why. Also, volatility: It’s a term investors don’t much like to hear in talks about the stock market. Why the last several weeks have been so up and down. Also, security is a term houses of worship are reconsidering after sanctuaries have become targets. We’ll hear from church and mosque leaders in Texas. And federal employees suing the government, the latest on court battle over the Affordable Care Act, and a little arts and poetry today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 16, 2018

Now more than 300 federal agents join police in the Texas capitol city to get to the bottom of a mystery over package bombs left on front stoops. Three bombs, two dead and a whole lot of questions, we’ll explore. We’ll hear about the first fatality, a talented 17 year old en route to UNT’s celebrated music program. Also, water scarcity in El Paso at the heart of a case before the supreme court. And in east Texas, the explosion that occurred 81 years ago this weekend. An event so traumatic people didn’t talk about it for generations. Now they’re trying to make sure the victims aren’t forgotten. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: February 20, 2018

86 cents of every dollar donated to state-level campaigns in Texas went to Republicans. We’ll do the numbers. And it’s here: early voting is underway for the Texas primaries. We’ll explore the rules behind where you can cast a ballot and why. And a city on the Texas coast is making plans to become the first new cruise ship port-of-call in about half a century. We’ll talk with the mayor leading the effort. Plus, a big U-S company is changing the way they do healthcare and it’s turning some heads. It may surprise you which company it is. And we’ll also hear from the filmmakers behind a new movie about an event that thrust one Texas city into the national spotlight a few decades ago. Those stories and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: February 9, 2018

A budget deal reached, but it took a while to get there and it’s STILL not a long-term fix. We’ll look at how Texas lawmakers voted. Also, suing the federal government: It’s not something that went out of fashion for Texas when Obama left office. Why the state continues to file lawsuits even with a Republican in the White House. And, tequila! A shortage could be on the horizon for the liquor that goes so well with Tex Mex. We’ll look at what’s going on in the industry that’s causing some crisis. And Texans may not be natural snow bunnies, but a few have still jumped to the highest levels of winter sports competition. We’ll tell you who to keep an eye out for in the Olympic action. Those stories plus the week in politics with the Texas Tribune, today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 18, 2018

The eyes of Texas are on Washington this hour and a federal shutdown looms, non essential services stopped. We’ll explore what that means for Texas. Plus, Governor Abbott’s kicked off his reelection campaign with a promise on property taxes. With more than a few challenging him for his seat, what can a governor really do? We’ll explore. And the wintry mix that shutdown several of Texas’ biggest cities, one of the weeks biggest stories, but how’s it been playing out down on the farm? There may be a bit of good news, for some Texas farmers and ranchers, we’ll hear why. And one of the most popular smartphone apps in the country right now, not available in Texas? Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 12, 2018

Texas violated federal law by denying countless kids access to special education services. The governor orders a plan to fix in 7 days, we’ll have details. Also, a tractor trailer truck with a dozen immigrants in the back, police in San Antonio charge the driver with human smuggling. Now the Lt. Governor asking if San Antonio police broke the law, we’ll hear why. And file under Big Gulp: what this week’s immigration raids on 7-11 stores tell us about the future of enforcement. And do smartphone makers have a duty to limit kids screen time? All that plus the week in politics with the Texas Tribune and a whole lot more, today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 18, 2017

In a place where there’s little water already, rising demand raising the stakes for everyone. We’re live from Marfa Public Radio today! Also, he may have hit a wall with congress, but President trump is moving fast to make a lasting mark on another front, and Texas is ground zero. Tilting the balance on the federal bench. And just a few miles from here they’re warming up the famous Mcdonald observatory telescopes as the US prepares for a rare solar eclipse. But why’s this one so special, and for researchers, what left to learn? And sine die for the special session, the week in Texas politics and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 24, 2017

If John Cornyn says it’s dead on arrival, what’s the prospect for President Trump’s budget? That may not be the point, we’ll explore. Also, dramatic slashes in government programs so deep even republicans are balking along with democrats. Texas Congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee says it’s a betrayal of Trump’s own constituents. And the end of telecommuting? One of corporate america’s top proponents does a full 180, we’ll hear why.
Those stories and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 23, 2016

Just in time for the holidays a federal court in Texas puts the brakes on a law expanding overtime to millions of workers. Plus you’ve heard about the protests in the Dakotas, but what about the science? Are the pipelines really that much of a threat to the water? We’ll explore. And deadlier than the top forms of cancer combined: efforts underway to reduce the number of medical mistakes. Plus a prominent politician says that in Texas, more money is spent keeping a person in prison than in educating a student. Is that fact? Also, planning a camping trip out in west Texas? Just so you know: the Big Bend bears are back. All that and more on today’s Texas Standard: