education

Texas Standard: January 25, 2021

And so it begins: the Attorney General of Texas files a lawsuit against the Biden administration over immigration enforcement changes. The story today on the Texas Standard.

Coming up- new findings on pregnancy and COVID-19. We’ll talk with a Texas-based maternal-fetal medicine specialist.

Also, should funding for Texas public schools be based on attendance, or enrollment? A democratic lawmaker calls for a shift from the former to the latter.

And, though the push for racial justice has brought down statues across the U.S., a new one is going up in College Station. We’ll hear from the student leading the push to honor a founding figure at Texas A&M.

Texas Standard: December 10, 2020

The start of the next Texas legislative session is looming… but what will it look like during this pandemic? Today on the Texas Standard.
We’ll examine questions over how Texas lawmakers will vote and what access the public will have to hearings. Plus, Texas nursing homes will be among the first places in the state to get access to the COVID-19 vaccine. We’ll look at how that rollout will happen. And, how a Texas town dependent on tourism is faring in this time of limited travel. That plus some options for safely connecting with Santa this holiday season. And why the keepsake could be more meaningful.

Texas Standard: December 9, 2020

“Deeply dysfunctional.” Part of the findings of an investigation of Fort Hood. We’ll look at actions taken — and what’s left undone. Today on the Texas Standard.
I’m Laura Rice in for David Brown. Learning during the pandemic. It’s been among the major challenges. So should it be business as usual when it comes to standardized tests?
Back to the ballot box. Some Texans are voting again. What the particularly contentious contest could tell us about the Texas Republican Party.
Plus, as the new Texas legislative session nears, we’ll examine a lawmaker’s claim on medical marijuana. And we’ll introduce you to the spider who saved Christmas.

Texas Standard: December 7, 2020

Front line workers in Texas get to get COVID-19 vaccines but educators and staff are demanding a better place in in the vaccination line. We’ll have details. Plus as Texas lawmakers get ready to start a new session, both republicans and democrats prepare to take on issues of voter fraud and voter access. Also, powering up: with a new administration in Washington, what’s set to change for the energy capitol of the U.S.? And billions of federal dollars for pandemic relief and time’s running out for Texas to spend it all. Where’s the money going? Plus listener questions about COVID-19 and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 23, 2020

Cars line up for miles outside food banks in our big cities. On this Thanksgiving week, the state of food insecurity in the state of Texas. As many Texans prepare for a big Thanksgiving dinner, others struggle with the choice of whether to leave the lights on or put food on the table. We’ll explore. Meanwhile health officials worry that holiday gatherings could become super spreader events. We’ll hear about the push for safety precautions to combat COVID-19 as case numbers rise statewide. Plus as national media focuses on the Latino vote, the case that the Tejano vote could be a better indicator. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 12, 2020

Texas crosses a critical 1 million mark in COVID-19 cases, and the governor sends help to Lubbock as hospitals reach capacity, we’ll have the latest. Other stories we are tracking: a post-election push to update voting machines in Texas’ biggest county. What’s wrong with the old ones? We’ll follow the paper trail, or lack thereof. Also the top vote getter in Texas history and what it says about the intersection of politics and how top judges get picked in Texas. Plus he was a Texas sharecroppers son in a Jim Crow Navy. Now a super carrier will bear his name. 8 decades after his heroics at Pearl Harbor, Dorie Miller gets his due. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 19, 2020

Millions of Texans turn out for week one of early voting in a state notorious for low turnout. A hint of a more fundamental change in Texas politics? That and more today on the Texas Standard.

In this most unconventional election season the state to watch is Texas: so declares veteran political journalist Dan Balz of the Washington Post. We’ll ask him what makes Texas the most intriguing place in politics in the nation right now.

Also, a rule change for social workers in Texas dialing back anti-discrimination protections based on sexual orientation, gender identity and disability. Many social workers call it a gut punch.

Texas Standard: October 16, 2020

As Coronavirus cases tick upwards again in Texas, some schools are returning to laptops and tablets. But others are going the opposite direction. Coming up our conversations with the superintendents of two Texas school districts where back to school is the rule, despite concerns about an uptick in Coronavirus cases. We’ll hear the rationale. Also you’ve heard of the great recession. Now the spotlight turns to what Texas researchers are calling the economic “she-session” of 2020. Plus the week in Texas politics with the Texas Tribune and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 6, 2020

A police shooting in a small north Texas town over the weekend now. A 22 year old police officer charged with the murder of Jonathan Price. We’ll have more. Also, another sort of Supreme Court battle, this one happening at the polls in Texas. We’ll explore. And it wasn’t so much the wind, but the rain–a researcher sounding the alarm over hurricanes that stall, a new normal? Plus the case of the missing students, during a pandemic. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 2, 2020

Governor Abbott orders no more than one drop off point for absentee ballots per county. The official in charge of elections for Travis county is pushing back against the governor saying all options are open. We’ll have the latest. Also, how the president’s positive test for Coronavirus has the potential to move the needle in a big way for Texas come election day. Plus Texas doctors concerned about chronic Coronavirus. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 29, 2020

A Texas county sheriff has turned himself in to the county jail he oversees after an investigation of evidence tampering in the death of a Black motorist. The sheriff of Williamson county indicted on felony charges stemming from the destruction of video evidence in death of Javier Ambler. This after a police chase filmed for a so-called reality TV show, we’ll have the latest. Also, where’s the beef? For many in this pandemic, its being shipped to the front door, causing ripple effects across the supply chain, we’ll explain. Plus disappearing Coronavirus data for schools and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 22, 2020

A Beta test for southeast Texas as rains pummel the region, roads are closed, schools shift plans and officials warn to stay put, we’ll have the latest. Also, COVID-19 has hit retail hard, but what about retail politics? The pandemic’s impact on a political season like few others in recent memory. Plus, Latino political power in Texas: under lockdown or primed to make major waves on election day? We’ll explore. And the U.S. Department of Transportation gives the green light to the Texas bullet train connecting Dallas to Houston in 90 minutes. All aboard? Not quite. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 17, 2020

The end of the month is fast approaching and that means time is running out to complete the 2020 census. With only a few days left on the census, we check in with counties in East Texas, far West Texas and Southwest Texas. Plus, a U.S. Congresswoman tells us why she was moved to introduce legislation after the gruesome murder of Fort Hood Army Specialist Vannessa Guillen. Also on COVID-19, we check in with San Antonio. And we tell you why some COVID-19 tests are so expensive? Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 16, 2020

Despite less money and name recognition than the incumbent, some think MJ Hegar has a strong chance of making political history in November. Many political analysts think air force veteran and teacher M.J. Hegar has the best chance of reclaiming a seat in the US senate for Texas democrats for the first time in two decades. Also what losing a newspaper means for a Texas town, a teachers’ struggle to wear a Black Lives Matter mask at school, and 80 million unrequested ballots sent to voters? A Politifact check of that claim by the president and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 15, 2020

No other state has shown as many cracks in its system of counting COVID-19 cases as Texas. Now the numbers are set to shift again. Why is Texas having such trouble with Coronavirus case counts? Edgar Walters of the Texas Tribune has the latest. Also, a plan for affordable housing gets slammed as a tax windfall for developers, we’ll hear why. And an indigenous tribe pushes the University of Texas to hand over Native American remains. Plus the ultimate how to book for those ready to leave it all behind: How to Astronaut. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 10, 2020

The politics of policing part two: the mayor of Austin pushes back against the governor’s call to take a pledge not to defund police. Coming up our conversation with Austin mayor Steve Adler who says characterizations of major cutbacks in the Texas capital city’s police funding amount to GOP politics as usual. We’ll hear more Also, changes to the sex ed curriculum in Texas, LGBTQ students say proposals are woefully inadequate as social conservatives push an abstinence only message. And the threat to a burgeoning industry, Texas wineries teaming up. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 31, 2020

Election day now almost 2 months away, and new battles forming over who in Texas gets to vote where and how. The Texas Secretary of State’s office threatens legal action over Harris county’s plan to send absentee ballot applications to every registered voter in the county, we’ll have the latest. Also a mass shooting in Odessa one year on, and the effort to hold the seller of the firearm legally accountable. And Daron Roberts on athlete activism and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Poem For A Rising Freshman

Students are headed back to school. For many, that’s in a virtual way. For almost all, it’s different than last fall. That was the inspiration for this Typewriter Rodeo poem.

Texas Standard: August 17, 2020

Lovers of the political theater get two extra hours of screen time today as the Democratic National Convention kicks off.

COVID cases in children are steadily increasing , says the CDC. And yet, in-person classes have resumed in some Texas school districts.

Airlines are losing money — but airlines are hoarding money? How those two can be true.

Join us as we re-imagine the US postal service. This reimagining has to do with healthcare and wellness checks that could come along with your mail.

Texas Standard: August 12, 2020

Historic: Vice President Joe Biden picks his own VP. Senator Kamala Harris and the intersection of race and gender in American politics. Also, back to school this year is filled with stress and anxieties for all. A conversation about the challenges in special education during this pandemic. Plus, what is the recovery rate of COVID-19 and can we even really answer that question? And entertainment awards season is just around the corner. It’s usually fancy dresses and red carpets but it will look different this year, many hope in more way than one. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard: