disability

The State of Disability in Texas – A Texas Standard special rebroadcast

It’s a population that’s often overlooked and underestimated: People living with disabilities play a wide variety of important roles in the life of modern Texas.

They’re living full lives, advocating for better caregiving options, inclusive transportation and voting accessibility. And many participate in the vibrant arts and culture of our state.

Learn more in this special edition of the Texas Standard: The State of Disability in Texas.

The State of Disability in Texas – A Texas Standard special

How does disability impact millions of Texans, from public policy to long COVID?

People living with disabilities – a population that’s often overlooked and underestimated – play a wide variety of important roles in the life of modern Texas. They’re living full lives: advocating for better caregiving options, inclusive transportation and voting accessibility. And many participate in the vibrant arts and culture of our state.

Encompassing the wide array of these experiences in just one program would be impossible. That’s why we’re treating this special as a kickoff of Texas Standard’s yearlong commitment to featuring the voices of and covering the topics important to disabled Texans.

What’s next after Abbott vetoes more than 70 bills?

The power of the pen: Gov. Greg Abbott has used his veto more this summer than he ever has before. What’s at stake?

Advocates for people with disabilities demanded some changes at the state Capitol this legislative session. We’ll hear more about how the issues fared from the Standard’s Shelly Brisbin.

Systems are pretty much back up and running in Dallas after a ransomware attack. A look at why these keep happening and how to prevent them.

Fentanyl in Mexico and the newer risks tainted drugs pose to those who travel there.

And it’s Juneteenth, also known as Emancipation Day or Freedom Day. We’ll visit a celebration in East Austin and talk to an author about enriching our understanding of the experiences of enslaved people.

Groups suing over SpaceX’s explosions, environmental impact

Published reports say the Biden administration is set to send 1,500 troops to the border with Mexico ahead of Title 42’s repeal.

As the Texas Legislature enters the home stretch of the 88th session, we’ll hear about the latest on efforts to pre-empt local government regulations.

The South Texas liftoff and explosion of the SpaceX Starship on April 20 has sparked legal action from environmental groups against the Federal Aviation
Administration. We’ll hear from one of the attorneys suing the government.

And a prominent member of Congress asks a judge in northern Texas to change the way the courts there do business.

What would property tax relief from the Legislature mean for Texas renters?

Winter storm and travel advisories across much of Texas with some forecast models indicating things could get worse. Victor Murphy of the National Weather Service with more on the icy situation that’s already led to many school closures and stranded motorists overnight.

Our closeup on property taxes continues as the Legislature sets its sights on cuts. The Texas Standard’s Sean Saldana has more on what this means for renters.

The Standard’s Shelly Brisbin on how advocates for Texans with disabilities are turning up the heat on lawmakers at the Capitol.

And 30 years after the Branch Davidian siege, we’re talking to Kevin Cook, author of the new book “Waco Rising.”

Texas Standard: October 3, 2022

We’ll take a look back at the top talking points in the gubernatorial debate between Greg Abbott and Beto O’Rourke Friday night, and whether it will have any impact come November. Plus an AP investigation finds disarray and dysfunction in the Texas Attorney General’s office. We’ll hear details. Also concerns by some Texas doctors that new restrictions are creating a different sort of opioid problem. And a conversation with Texas A&M Task Force One as they search for survivors in the aftermath of Hurricane Ian. Those stories and a lot more on todays Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: February 24, 2022

We’re keeping a watch on the situation in Ukraine and the ripple effects for Texas. Plus, with early voting ending tomorrow, what to watch for in Texas’ first-in-the-nation primaries. Also, Governor Abbott’s role in keeping energy prices high during last year’s deadly statewide freeze. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: December 14, 2021

All politics is local, the saying goes…but hyperpartisan, too? How the TX landscape is changing for local and school board races. Republicans in Potter County, home to Amarillo say they’ll conduct their own primary without the help of election officials and they’re urging other Texas counties to do the same. We’ll have the latest. Plus Texans sparked a lithium battery revolution, now another Texas breakthrough that could lead to something more sustainable and stable. And a critically acclaimed Texas trio hits it big, inspired by the sounds of Houston. Our conversation with the members of Khruangbin and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 30, 2021

We’re going into another academic year that will be impacted by the pandemic. What we know now about how it’s affected student progress. Also, the DACA program can no longer accept new applicants based on a Texas judge’s ruling. So what’s that mean going forward? And the pandemic’s impact on employment has meant some gains for Americans with disabilities. What employers can learn. Also the pandemic’s partly responsible for Texas’ frenzied housing market. But will the bubble burst? We’ll ask an expert. We’ll also remember a dark day in Texas history, 55 years ago. And we’ll wrap up our Friday with the top news from this week in Texas politics. All of that today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 6, 2021

Today is the day when you will learn what SB7 stands for. In short it’s the voting bill that was killed but could come back, we’ll have the latest. Also, Immigration courts are re-opening today after being out for a year, we’ll have details. Plus, are you one of the 3.4 million Texans who are caring for an adult family member? It’s pricey and it’s uncomfortable to put a price tag on their care, but there may be some help on the way. And do you know your history? What about your Asian American history? And speaking of history and historic moments – the story of the first astronaut to do an untethered space walk. All of that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 18, 2021

Is there a doctor in the House? At least one COVID-19 case reported among Texas lawmakers and what that may mean for getting back to business at the Texas capitol, we’ll have the latest. Also, President elect Joe Biden says one of the first things he’ll do after inauguration is rejoin the Paris Climate accords but new research from Texas A&M suggests one of the targets for temperature limits is already on track to being exceeded. Game over? Not quite. We’ll hear why and what comes next. And federal officials approve new standards of health care in a crisis for people with disabilities. So what changes in Texas? Also, amid a new reckoning on race, remembering Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. All of those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 11, 2020

A prescription for Coronavirus relief? Congress hasn’t come up with it, and there’s a major political price that could be paid in Texas, too. Less than two months till election day and the message from constituents: we need relief from the economic effects of the pandemic. Politicians on both sides of the aisle say they get it, so where’s the relief package? We’ll explore. Also what’s in a name: the push to identify heatwaves as we do hurricanes. And American gothic reimagined in a Texas of today. The week in politics with the Texas Tribune and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 6, 2020

As officials confirm the killing of a soldier missing for months from Fort Hood, demands for the military to do more about sexual harassment, we’ll have details. Also, health officials in Texas concerned that finding a vaccine for COVID-19 may not be the final obstacle to a return to normal. Now some are speaking out about misinformation on vaccines. And many Texans are getting tested for the Coronavirus, but not all are getting their results. A firsthand account and what it says about the coordination of efforts in Texas to curb the spread of the virus. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 19, 2019

As smoke from a chemical fire fouls the air over Houston, officials insist it’s not toxic. We’ll look at what we’re learning 3 days into a massive petrochemical blaze. Also, John Cornyn may have felt a sense of relief when Beto O’Rourke decided to run for president, but he may yet need that multimillion dollar warchest. Carlos Sanchez of Texas monthly reports on what could well be another battle royale for a U.S. senate seat. And shops selling CBD oil in Texas, is that legal? Those stories and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: February 28, 2019

A key provision of the Texas open meetings act struck down by the state’s highest criminal court. We’ll look at what it means for government transparency. Also, the state’s school librarians read the fine print of a bill to hike teacher salaries, and they’re pushing back. We’ll hear from the state’s top librarian. Plus the timeless voice of tejano superstar Selena. Was it one voice, or two? All those stores and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 9, 2018

Migrants entering the U.S. illegally can request asylum according to U.S. law, but not according to the President. We’ll explore the emergency order on asylum seekers. Also, a federal court orders Texas to pay back millions after a scandal involved special education, we’ll take a look. And a Texas-sized problem for folks with disability parking privileges. Plus an effort in Dallas to get more women conducting symphonies: are their neighbors listening? We’ll explain. And what a week in Texas politics: we’ll look back with the Texas Tribune and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 1, 2018

A Foster care system so dangerous to kids, its been ruled unconstitutional. Should the Feds be permitted to order a fix for Texas? We’ll have the latest. Also, after parkland everyone seems to have an opinion on whether there should be tighter controls on guns. But some Texans with a personal stake in the matter say they don’t have a seat at the table, and they’re demanding a hearing. We’ll hear why. Also, Sprint and T-Mobile want to get married. If anyone has reasons why these two should not be wed, it might be Texas-based AT&T who’s fighting its own anti-trust battle at the moment. We’ll hear why that might matter to you. Plus a surprise endorsement in the Governor’s race and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 8, 2018

A culture of cover up? Claims of abuse against juvenile offenders are swept under the carpet according to a whistleblower, we’ll have the latest. Also, after Harvey, many homeowners and businesses wondered how the flooding could have happened, given the flood maps. A new study says that’s the problem: the maps are wrong. And a symbol of Texas honky tonk music packing bags for Memphis. What the move means for the live music capitol. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 6, 2017

Marathon: more than a city in west Texas, a description of a drama unfolding at the capitol right now. Also the number of people apprehended at the border hits a 17 year low. History says they’re supposed to be on the rise. What’s up? Some answers from the front lines. And as fears escalate over deportation in Spanish speaking communities, some Texas businesses try adaptation: the new rules of engagement with customers. Also a spike in disability claims in rural America has researchers asking how ya gonna keep em down on the farm, or the ranch. And if internet companies are gonna share your info, what can you do to keep it to yourself? Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard: