death

Hospice

We’ll all have unavoidable goodbyes on Earth. The details may be different but those left living will undoubtedly face big and complex and changing feelings. This Typewriter Rodeo poem offers one experience as an example.

How a UT professor is helping the CDC plan for the next pandemic

The Texas Education Agency is moving forward with plans to monitor problems with Austin ISD’s special education services.

What did we learn from COVID-19? We’ll talk to UT’s Lauren Ancel Meyers, who has been tapped to help the U.S. develop a plan to better tackle the next pandemic.

Texas tops the nation in oil industry deaths – but there’s more to the story once you get into the numbers.

Also: Remembering a pioneer of Tejano music, Lydia Mendoza, who earned the title of “Meadowlark of the Border.”

The future of TikTok hinges on ‘Project Texas’

Another tragedy in Uvalde, this one involving human smuggling. We’ll have the details on events there and in Eagle Pass that left three dead over the weekend.

Crowds are expected at the state Capitol this week as lawmakers take up several bills involving the treatment of transgender Texans.

What does it mean for Texas to blacklist a bank, especially at a time when the industry is so volatile?

“Project Texas” could be central to preventing a U.S. TikTok ban. But what is it exactly?

And why is a Texas school district considering leaving a statewide organization of school boards that until now has had 100% participation from public districts in the state?

Texas Standard: August 24, 2022

Hours away from a new law that amounts to a near total ban on abortions in Texas and a new legal challenge to that law. As Texas’ version of a post Roe vs. Wade trigger law takes effect, reproductive rights groups are suing the state attorney general. We’ll hear about the strategy and the prospects. Also, 5 years after Hurricane Harvey there are ongoing attempts to buyout the homes of people living in land that repeatedly floods. So how’s that working out? We’ll hear the latest. Also actor and comedian Mo Amer on a new Netflix series some say is the first of its kind to really capture the feel of a modern Houston. Plus a Politifact check and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 29, 2022

As the investigation continues in a migrant smuggling tragedy, border officials in El Paso sound an alarm over migrant deaths due to water. Coming up: a Texas pre-Roe abortion ban blocked by a Harris county judge. We’ll have the latest. Plus a conversation with the eldest daughter of Norma McCorvey, the Texan better known as Jane Roe in the landmark Roe v Wade case. And a first of its kind in Texas, diplomas for newly minted podiatrists. We’ll talk with the inaugural dean of Texas’ first school of podiatry and why its location is so critical. And the GOP platform call for Texas to secede: could Texas do that? A Politifact check and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 28, 2022

An horrific discovery outside of San Antonio where investigators describe one of the deadliest human smuggling incidents in years. The bodies of at least 50 people, all suspected migrants, found in and around an unair-conditioned abandoned tractor trailer truck. We’ll have the latest. Also the continued repercussions of the Dobbs decision. How the fall of Roe factors into Texas politics: specifically the race for governor. Plus post Roe privacy concerns and the intersection with technology, including the smartphone. And the push for truancy reforms after the shooting in Uvalde and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: December 20, 2021

Since 2010, more than 380 workers have died in the U.S. due to conditions at work. Deaths which experts say were preventable. The problem of heat-related deaths in the workplace is likely to intensify with climate change and workers of color are disproportionately affected. And what’s being done to curb these deaths? We’ll have the findings of a year long investigation by NPR, The Texas and California Newsrooms, Columbia Journalism Investigations and Public Health Watch, on a special edition of the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 24, 2021

Since 2010, more than 380 workers have died in the U.S. due to conditions at work. Deaths which experts say were preventable. The problem of heat-related deaths in the workplace is likely to intensify with climate change and workers of color are disproportionately affected. And what’s being done to curb these deaths? We’ll have the findings of a year long investigation by NPR, The Texas and California Newsrooms, Columbia Journalism Investigations and Public Health Watch:

Texas Standard: November 9, 2021

More lawsuits pour in as officials continue to investigate how a concert crowd turned deadly, we’ll have the latest. Also, Texas is worse off now than a year ago. At least that’s one takeaway from the latest University of Texas / Texas Tribune Poll… We’ll have a look deeper into the data. Also a celebration of Jewish religion and culture on screen, even as the community has faced recent attacks. The mission of the Austin Jewish Film Festival. Plus we’ll explore a new book that highlights some underrepresented voices in the historic record on civil rights. And a tiny Texas town adjusts to unprecedented growth and explores how it might maintain what’s made it unique. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 21, 2021

Hundreds more federal agents are sent to south Texas as the Biden administration steps up deportations of most Haitian migrants. After promises for sweeping changes in immigration policy, the Biden administration facing heat from immigration advocates and even some democrats over its handling of a humanitarian crisis at the border. We’ll hear more. Also the numbers are in, but how will the new political maps being drawn up by Texas lawmakers reflect the growing numbers of members of minority groups and people of color that have moved to Texas since the last census? And the unusual approach to saving the ocelot in south Texas. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 14, 2021

We’ll bring you the latest on tropical storm Nicholas. Also, a carefully crafted letter from Bell county officials to their community. We’ll listen to their heart-wrenching message. And sometimes it’s hard to understand what the FCC does, but this time it’s straightforward. It’s setting aside money for people who need better internet access. We’ll also learn about a boot camp. Not the kind where you drop down and give me 50, but a boot camp that gets soldiers ready for college. And Cricket, the sport, is investing big time in North Texas. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 13, 2021

Making good on a threat: Texas is suing over school mask mandates. We’ll take a look at what we know about a lawsuit against six Texas school districts. Also tropical storm Nicholas is headed towards the Texas Gulf Coast. We’ll discuss what the state and coastal cities are doing now and the implications as oil production is still offline from Hurricane Ida in Louisiana. And twenty years ago today… a disaster along the South Texas Coast. Remembering the Queen Isabella Causeway Collapse. Plus the Republican Party and Texas are practically synonymous in current politics but things have changed over the decades. A look back today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 10, 2021

The US attorney general says the Texas abortion law is one “all Americans should fear” in announcing a legal challenge to new abortion restrictions in Texas. We’ll hear about the justice departments plans. Plus officials hesitant to issue sweeping vaccine mandates out of fears of being sued may have it all wrong. So says a Texas scholar, we’ll hear why. And veterans, Gen-Z and 9/11… how different groups of Texans are reflecting on the attacks of 20 years ago. Plus the week in politics and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 9, 2021

The U.S. Supreme Court intervenes to stay a Texas execution over the role of spiritual advisors in the execution chamber. We’ll have details. Also, do laws restricting abortion access lead to cycles of poverty? A groundbreaking long term study says yes, amid a national conversation over Texas’ new abortion law. And Freedom calling? Or more like spam? The story behind a smartphone marketed to conservatives who want to make a break from big tech. And looking back 100 years after a Texas flood disaster that led to housing discrimination, environmental racism, and demands for change. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 8, 2021

The date’s been set: September 20th. And so has the agenda, if the Governor has his way. What’s in store for a third special session? We’ll have details. Also, new lawsuits take aim at Texas’ new election laws. And as the U.S. goes, so goes Mexico? Quite the contrary, as Mexico’s Supreme Court, in a dramatic step, decriminalizes abortion. A victory for an increasingly strong women’s rights movement there. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 7, 2021

The U.S. Justice Department pledging to explore ways to challenge Texas’ abortion law. But many questions as to how. We’ll take a closer look. Also, more than 57.000 Texans killed by COVID-19 so far. With new variants popping up, is this a pandemic or endemic? A Texas virus expert on whether and how the fight against COVID-19 should change. And engineering expertise and hard work. Once the recipe for success in the energy industry, now Texas energy companies say there’s a skills gap with more high tech hires needed for cleaner energy jobs. Also how new voting laws could backfire against the GOP. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 6, 2021

Texas 2nd special session of the year is over. And a new opinion poll suggests the result is not a necessarily good look for Governor Abbott. If critics were correct that the Governor’s legislative agenda was an effort to win over Texans prior to his reelection campaign, it hasn’t quite worked out as a net positive for him, if a new opinion poll is correct. What’s behind Governor Abbott’s highest ever disapproval numbers? Also, the Pentagon says a Texan was among the last U.S. service members to die in Afghanistan We’ll hear from the widow of another soldier killed in the attack on Kabul airport. Plus a call for a rethink of the American military and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 9, 2021

For some communities in Texas when it rains, it pours. We’ll speak with the mayor of Rockport about the ongoing storms. Plus, a look at how vulnerable Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton may be on his next bid for office. And how proving that major transportation projects do not discriminate against riders can unleash massive amounts of money from the federal government. And how the punishment for a men’s soccer team is affecting a women’s soccer team, today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 22, 2021

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton has multiple legal challenges and now multiple challengers for his seat within his party. We’ll take a look at who. Also, Texas college sports bring in big money. What’s an unanimous Supreme Court decision yesterday mean for athlete compensation? And Texas has lost more rural hospitals recently than any other state. So what’s that mean in an emergency? Plus dozens of Texas prisoners set for release or parole have died behind bars in the past year or so. A new study gets behind delays. And one Texas prison is cleared out to hold migrants. We’ll examine what issues might arise. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 6, 2021

Do the state’s numbers add up? A Houston Chronicle investigation finds twice as many deaths due to the February storm and blackouts. Other stories we’re tracking, the return of baseball and the absence of the Governor who turned down the opportunity to throw the first pitch. But he may have lobbed an early salvo in a much bigger matter over changes to voting laws in Texas, one with huge implications. Gromer Jeffers of the Dallas Morning News explains. Also the story of the Texas women who led a revolution in voting rights. Plus, trying to buy a home in Texas? You may not believe who you’re competing against. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard: