DACA

What did the Legislature accomplish for rural Texans?

The U.S. House approved a measure lifting the debt ceiling, but we’re not out of the woods quite yet.

As state lawmakers continue to tangle with the governor’s priorities, what actually was accomplished in the regular legislative session? A roundtable of Texas reporters looks at changes for rural Texans.

A federal district judge will hear arguments today on the future of DACA in a case brought by the attorney general of
Texas, who’s now been impeached and suspended. How much does that change things, if at all?

Also, they’re not just a time suck but a money pit, too: What can be done to cut the cost of meetings?

The rock stars and unsung heroes of Texas guitar playing

2 years after the insurrection on Capitol Hill the implications of the event and its aftermath for Texas and Texans. We’ll have more. Also on this January 6th, a look at concerns about extremism among some who previously served their country in the military. And order in the court? Despite discrepancies in representation between men and women in many fields, Texas bucking national trends with what some have called a golden age of elected female judges. And taco journalist Mando Rayo serves up some tips for home cooking. Plus the greatest Texas guitarists of all time, the week in politics with the Texas Tribune and much more today on the Texas Standard:

How Austin is bringing healthcare to people experiencing homelessness

That light at the end of the tunnel, is it a sign that a rail strike can be averted or a freight train headed for the U.S. economy? With an economy already reeling from a multitude of challenges, president Biden gets the wheels rolling in congress to head off a potential nationwide rail strike. We’ll look at the potential impact for Texas and the prospects that a strike can be avoided. Also one of the last fully independent public institutions of higher learning set to join the UT system. What does Stephen F. Austin State University stand to gain or lose in the process? Also a closer look at the Texas economic forecast and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 21, 2022

One more snapshot of Texas voter sentiment before Texas voters begin casting early ballots in the midterms. Jim Henson of the Texas Politics Project with what the latest survey says about how voters are leaning as we enter the height of election season. Also rumbling among some Republicans exploring whether there should be exceptions added to Texas’ abortion ban. And Oil company plans for a major carbon capture complex in Texas. Plus an investigation by Texas Monthly reveals an organized effort to establish a school voucher program through a small Texas public school district. Those stories and more and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard : August 19, 2022

Three months from statewide midterm elections- but who’ll be running them if elections administrators keep leaving their jobs? That and more on the Texas Standard.
Concerns grow amid a high turnover of county election administrators and staff. We’ll hear from the Texas Secretary of State’s office.
How back to school in Texas has left many students caught in the crosshairs of the culture wars.
And with Tesla and SpaceX and a base of operations in Texas, Elon Musk is one of the nation’s most polarizing figures. Why some say it’s time to move on from his visions of the future.
Also, DACA ten years on- what’s next? The week in politics with the Texas Tribune and more.

Texas Standard: July 30, 2021

We’re going into another academic year that will be impacted by the pandemic. What we know now about how it’s affected student progress. Also, the DACA program can no longer accept new applicants based on a Texas judge’s ruling. So what’s that mean going forward? And the pandemic’s impact on employment has meant some gains for Americans with disabilities. What employers can learn. Also the pandemic’s partly responsible for Texas’ frenzied housing market. But will the bubble burst? We’ll ask an expert. We’ll also remember a dark day in Texas history, 55 years ago. And we’ll wrap up our Friday with the top news from this week in Texas politics. All of that today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 19, 2021

A Texas judge puts the brakes on a program designed to defer deportations of younger migrants to the U.S. We’ll hear about the implications, short and long term, for the DACA program after a federal judge in Houston rules it unlawful. Also, 5 Texas democratic lawmakers who left the Lone Star State to protest proposals for new voting restrictions have tested positive for COVID-19, and Texas doctors voice concerns about rising numbers of juvenile and adolescent covid cases. We’ll have the latest. Plus Van Horn Texas prepares for its moment in the national spotlight. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: December 22, 2020

What we should know and when about a highly contagious variant of COVID-19. One of Texas’ top infectious disease experts joins us. We’ll ask Dr. Peter Hotez all we can about the latest spread of the coronavirus, the vaccine, and what we need to know here in Texas. Meanwhile, a Texas-led challenge to DACA is in court. Why it matters even though a Biden presidency is just around the corner. And redistricting will be a top priority when Texas lawmakers start the next legislative session. We’ll break down how they’ll draw maps. And we’re not letting Senator Ted Cruz get away with a bold claim without putting it through a fact-check. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 30, 2020

The complicated formula for funding schools in Texas now adds 5 letters and two numbers: COVID-19. How should we fund schools while in the midst of a global pandemic? The push and pull, we’ll have more. We also learn about the movement born out of the murder of Fort Hood soldier Vannesa Guillen: NoMás. What it means to say No More. And have you heard about “hygiene theater”? Does it make us safer? We’ll find out. And we take a look at the growing pains of oil production in Texas, an industry much touted by the president during his visit yesterday. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 29, 2020

To apply or not to apply? Is DACA on or is it off? Wait, didn’t the Supreme Court say it was on? We’ll have the answers. And speaking about the Supreme Court, a refresher on voting by mail. Also the story of two survivors of the Walmart killings in El Paso and their reunion almost a year to the day. And did you hear commissioners in Harris County are thinking about suing the state of Texas? Plus did you know the census and healthcare outcomes could be interconnected? All of that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 18, 2020

The high court pushes back on a DACA rollback, but leaves open many questions about the future of the program that protects hundreds of thousands of young people from deportation, we’ll take a closer look. Also, understanding Juneteenth: a firsthand reflection on its importance. Plus the first FDA approved video game: a high tech prescription to help young people with attention deficit challenges. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 11, 2019

What could be one of the most consequential Supreme Court cases this term, affecting tens of thousands of people in Texas. The nation’s highest court set to hear arguments over DACA, the program that protects some 700 thousand people from deportation. President trump’s tried to unravel it. We’ll look more closely at what’s at stake. Also, is Mexico taking a page from president Trump’s policy toward migrant families? Separation south of the border. And what does it mean to get good at responding to mass shootings? All of those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 23, 2019

The Supreme Court appears to take DACA off the table in shutdown negotiations, but where does that leave thousands of DACA recipients in Texas? We’ll explore. Also in the Texas Standard newsroom, another Supreme Court order we’re assessing: the impact of the reinstatement of the Trump administration’s so-called transgender military ban. We’ll take a look at the impact of those seeking to serve. And police, veterans, cancer research, political action committees have formed around lots of worthy causes. But where’s the money going? A look at so called scam pacs and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 3, 2018

As Texans headed out for the long holiday weekend, a surprise ruling in a Texas courtroom over a Texas challenge to DACA. DACA is the Obama era program protecting young immigrants brought here illegally from being deported. Now a judge in Texas, considered sympathetic to the state’s claims to stop DACA, refuses to pull the plug. Why does Attorney general Ken Paxton think he’s closer to victory? We’ll find out. Also, labor day signals the final sprint in the race to election day. We’ll size up the top races across Texas. And a resurgence of unions? In the Lone Star State? The numbers say yes. All of that and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 9, 2018

Two very different rulings on two very similar cases. What it means when the 5th and the 9th circuit court’s disagree? We’ll explore. Plus Mexico’s president elect receives his certificate of ratification: The electoral commission says yes, you are the winner. We’ll explore the implications. And fever ticks can kill cattle but regulations on treating fever ticks? Those cause headaches and other complications. We’ll tell you more. And are you dreaming about space and looking for ways to get there? We’ll take a look at a summer camp helping kids get closer to their dreams. And another one of those too good to be true stories, are we talking about Movie Pass? Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard.

Texas Standard: August 8, 2018

A bunch of attorneys shined up their shoes this morning, they’re heading to court to for Texas v Nielsen, we’ll look at the details. Plus, Houston cops are learning to speak Mandarin, hoping to fill a huge void. And I know you’ve heard about Mexico’s drug war, but you’ve never heard it this way? A new book called Don’t Send Flowers from Corpus Christi and a woman on a quest to hear what it means to live in a black body. Plus, 8 hour lines at the DMV?? Weren’t super centers supposed to fix those? Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 14, 2017

File under “Texas Two Step”: Texas sues to terminate DACA, the federal government says it won’t fight back. Any guesses who’ll win? The story today on the Texas Standard.

Pete Williams of NBC News tells us about the lawsuit playing out in a Texas courtroom that could do a stealthy end run around orders to keep deferred action for childhood arrivals the law of the land.

Hurricane help from above? The Texas-made satellite that might save lives.

As the World Cup kicks off in Russia, a Texas researcher claims he can tell you the champion today. We’ll hear what’s in his algorithm.

And the virtual battle for your video box getting all too real at E3. Digital savant Omar Gallaga joins us and a whole lot more today on the Standard.

Texas Standard: May 8, 2018

The new Texas lawsuit to stop DACA: a top republican says he doesn’t get it. A difference over strategy or some deeper fissure? We’ll explore. Also, teacher walkouts in other parts of the country, now a new report compares teacher pay in Texas with national norms: we’ll do the numbers. And before the system was reformed, thousands of Texas high schoolers didn’t get diplomas because of scores on standardized tests. Now, a second chance. We’ll hear how and who’s qualified. And the Texas expats behind some of Hollywood’s quirkiest movies and TV shows reflect on the journey from slacker land. We’ll talk with the Duplass brothers, Mark and Jay. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 2, 2018

From Dalhart to Dumas, San Antonio to San Angelo, Houston, Tyler, Marfa, College Station and all across the lone star nation no matter where you are, it’s Texas Standard time. Governor Abbott used to take delight in filing lawsuits against the Obama administration, so why’s Texas suing the Trump administration? You may be surprised by the answer. Also, the capitol city has a plan to mandate paid sick leave for businesses within city limits. That’s sparked a legal battle with businesses owners and the state, we’ll explore. And imagine 10 years with tap water so poisonous, you won’t dare drink it or bathe in it. A south Texas town fights back. Plus a 200 percent increase in heroin snagged at the border? a fact check and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 25, 2018

The governor calls for an emergency election in a Harvey hit district that’s also lost its Congressman. Does the maneuver pass muster? By November 6th, voters in Texas 27th district will have one, two, three chances to cast a ballot for their representative to the US.. House. Confusing? We’ll walk you through it. Also a new ruling on DACA and a blow to President Trump. We’ll hear what the decision means for young undocumented immigrants and the program designed to protect them from deportation. And the man president Trump wants to pardon, they called him the Galveston giant. We’ll have the view from Jack Johnson’s hometown and so much more on todays Texas Standard: