China

How Mexico supplanted China as the nation’s top trade partner

A shooting at one of the most famous megachurches in Texas, Joel Osteen’s Lakewood Church in Houston, leaves one dead and a child in critical condition. We’ll have the latest.

For most of the past few decades, the title of “top trading partner to the U.S.” has belonged to China – but the U.S. Census Bureau reports that last year, the United States’ biggest trading partner was Mexico.

Civil rights groups have filed a federal complaint against Bonham ISD alleging disciplinary discrimination against Black and disabled students.
The latest on a mysterious listeria outbreak.

And Russian propagandists twisting the narrative over border standoff between the Biden administration and Gov. Greg Abbott.

What’s behind the massive oil spill in the Gulf?

An oil spill in the Gulf is considered to be among the worst in U.S. history. After two weeks, why is it getting so little attention?

We’ll hear about an unintended impediment to the growth of electric vehicle manufacturing in the U.S.

After a political fight over a school voucher-like program, salary bumps for Texas teachers are off the table. Why some teachers say they’re OK with that.

Also: What’s behind Mark Cuban’s sale of the Dallas Mavericks, and what could it mean?

Is this the end of efforts to keep Fairfield Lake State Park public?

For the first time in modern memory, the Texas House is set to take up a school voucher-like plan.

How do you put a price tag on a state park? We’ll hear more about the challenges facing Texas Parks and Wildlife as it tries to reclaim parkland purchased by developers.

In a dramatic U-turn this week, China’s president appears to be trying to warm up to the U.S. Some clues as to why might be found in a new report from the Dallas Federal Reserve.

Also: What some forecasters are calling a “super El Niño” is coming soon to Texas.

How two Uvalde survivors are rebuilding their lives

Almost a year after the mass shooting at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, two injured fourth graders are still trying to recover. Edgar Sandoval of the New York Times talks with us about his profile of two children injured in the shooting – and the months since.

Yesterday’s half-hour grounding of Southwest Airlines departures was blamed on technical issues. Why the FAA and other investigators want a closer look.

Why some lawmakers are pushing to keep Texas crypto miners from cashing in on a tool to help the power grid survive during times of peak demand.

Weird Things in the Sky

For a few days it was all we could talk about: what is that thing? And then it was: what are those things? For the most part, we’ve moved on. But the answers remain a bit unsatisfactory for many. That was the inspiration for this Typewriter Rodeo poem.

Why Texas and the U.S. need larger apartments

Is there a Speaker in the House? Texas’ role in the drama over who will lead the majority in the U.S. House of Representatives. No state sends more republicans to Congress than Texas, but those republicans are at loggerheads over who to pick as House speaker, and it’s brought Congress to a standstill before the next session’s even underway. Sean Theriault of UT Austin explains what’s happening and why. Also new travel restrictions as a Covid outbreak spreads in China. How concerned should Texans be, and will the restrictions really help? And W.F. Strong looks back on an historic sunken treasure discovery and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 7, 2022

A major turning point for marijuana laws or more political smoke and mirrors? A sweeping pardon for federal marijuana possession convictions announced by president Biden. Though federal and state marijuana laws remain in place, what are the implications in Texas? And what else should Texans be looking for? We’ll explore with a top expert on drug policy at Rice University. Also Facebook’s gone Meta. Twitter may be going to Musk. Who’s the new king of social media and why does it matter? Also the week that was in Texas politics and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 3, 2021

Eight constitutional amendments, all 8 approved by voters. And local ballot measures, too. Any way to tease out political change in Texas? We’ll explore. Other stories we’re tracking: wind turbines set to join oil rigs in along the Texas coast? We’ll have more on big plans for renewable power generation in the Gulf of Mexico. Also more people, less water. How North Texas is planning for the future and why some residents are not going with the flow. And Texas has been home to many icons, including some iconic words. Commentator W.F. Strong on a certain noun with Texas ties that’s gone global. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Overlooked No More: How Asian Texans Shape The State

It’s Labor Day and we have a special show for you- “Overlooked No More: How Asian Texans Shape the State. Here on the Texas Standard.
We’ll talk about How the Asian American community has changed from 1870, the first time the US census counted people from China to today.
We’ll meet a group called the “Pershing Chinese”. A story of Chinese immigration through Mexico.
Then we’ll travel to the border where a vibrant Filipino community settled.
Is it time to re-evaluate the holidays we celebrate in Texas???
Plus, K-pop and activism. And the state of jobs and healthcare during COVID.

Texas Standard: August 3, 2020

One year after the deadliest attack against Latinos in recent history, Texas remembers those lost in El Paso during a day of reflection and healing.
Democrats beating republicans in fundraising for Texas congressional races- a closer look.
Also, a battle in Midland before and after a vote to rename a city high school.
The storm before the storms. What Hurricane Hanna might add up to for Texas’ energy sector.
And packets of mystery seeds from China raising concerns–a Texas A&M expert is on the case. Those stories & much more.

Texas Standard: July 23, 2020

According to published reports, the Rio Grande Valley may have the worst rate of COVID-19 hospitalization in the country. We’ll talk with the mayor of Harlingen today. Also, food banks across the Lone Star State brace for increased demand in August. We’ll hear why. Plus more on the abrupt shutdown of the Chinese consulate in Houston as the Trump administration ratchets up pressure with espionage claims. And the app from a China based company that some lawmakers are trying to ban. Tech expert Omar Gallaga with details. All of that and then some today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 31, 2020

On the front lines in the war against COVID-19: how the fight is playing out in rural Texas, and the potential health crisis few are talking about. We’ll have the latest. Also, Texas counts! We all know that, right? But many worry that Texas might miss out on an important tally that could cost Texas more than just hundreds of millions of dollars, we’ll explain. And how to make sense of Coronavirus case counts. Plus where do doctors turn for medical supplies? How the current crisis may force a rethink of the healthcare supply chain. Those stories and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 16, 2020

A new trade deal with China… So what’s in it for us? Could be a sizable portion of Chinese spending on sectors with a strong Texas showing. It’s not the end of the trade war, but it might make a difference to industries in the Lone Star State. Also, what sounds like a change of position on climate change from the head of the Texas oil and gas association…but is it? And is Trader Joes still the best grocery chain in America? Here’s a hint: no. What is and why and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 31, 2019

Does the state have a duty to provide mobile voting centers? Texas democrats claim a new law unconstitutionally disenfranchises young voters, we’ll have details. Also, did Exxon Mobil have one set of numbers about climate change for investors, and a secret set for itself? Texan Rex Tillerson takes the stand in a closely watch trial involving one of the Lone Star State’s biggest companies. Plus, Twitter banning political ads? Tech expert Omar Gallaga on why and what it adds up to. And why you might see tarantulas crossing Texas roadways, and not just tonight, mind you. All of that and then some today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 8, 2019

U.S. Soldiers coming home, but what are they leaving behind? We’ll have a closer look at the decision to get U.S. troops out of northern Syria and why that matters. Also, China calls foul: how Houston found itself at the center of an international incident over Hong Kong. And word from Corpus Christi that the Selena festival is being cancelled in her hometown. Plus the first Latina to create produce write and star in her own sitcom tells her story of coming of age in the Rio Grande Valley, she calls it her mixtape memoir. All of that and then some today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 24, 2019

The Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits employment discrimination on the basis of sex. But what about sexual orientation? We’ll take a closer look at the Supreme Court’s decision to hear a trio of cases with the potential of expanding gay lesbian and transgender rights. Also, 3 scientists being fired amid espionage fears at Houston’s prestigious M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. And we’ve been hearing about Central American migrants at the border: a surprising number waiting in Ciudad Juárez are coming in from Cuba. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 16, 2018

Round two getting underway tonight in San Antonio: what to expect in the last debate before early voting between Ted Cruz and Beto O’rourke. Also, the policy of family separations at the border was a bust, but now the Washington Post reports it may be making a comeback. We’ll hear the how and why. And Texas is a leader in wind energy, but is the push for wind turbines about to run out of air? We’ll hear why some are worried. Also, what some have called a declaration of a new cold war. Why you might have missed it and why the Chinese certainly did not. All those stories and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 16, 2018

Testimony gets underway today in a challenge to Texas’ fetal burial law: a law that some believe is really designed to undermine abortion providers, we’ll have details. Also, half the kids under the age of five separated from their families under the Trump administration’s zero-tolerance plan have now been reunite. But with a court-ordered deadline to complete reunifications fast approaching, we’ll take you to El Paso where people are trying to put families back together. And the toll of tariffs on Texas businesses. Plus attracting businesses and creating Texas jobs: how well do incentives really work? Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard: