Bugs

Celebrating summer with Willie Nelson, new book releases, aguas frescas & more

With lots of food and fireworks, Texans turn out to mark the Fourth of July – and we’re celebrating with a special program dedicated to summer in the Lone Star State:
Julia Green, the manager at Front Street Books in Alpine, shares her recommendations on new book releases to add to your summer reading list.
Top tips from the barbecue editor at Texas Monthly on how to smoke short ribs in your own backyard.
The backstory of Willie Nelson’s famous Fourth of July picnic.
Mando Rayo, taco journalist and host of the Tacos of Texas podcast, has some suggestions for beating the heat with aguas frescas.
Plus: top songs of the season with a Texas connection.

Examining Texas’ legacy of anti-LGBT laws

After seven months pushing a school voucher-like plan, Gov. Greg Abbott gets a firm pushback from fellow Republicans. Scott Braddock of the Quorum Report shares the latest.

Mexico plans to offer “know your rights” educational sessions in Texas as lawmakers send a wide-ranging border security bill to the governor.

Amid slowing sales of EV’s, one city in Texas seems to be leading the switch away from gas pumps to charging stations.

The past legislative session saw the filing of a historic number of bills impacting LGBT Texans – but that’s just the latest effort in what’s been a half-century of criminalizing these communities, according to a new investigation from KXAN TV.

The Texas Eclipse Festival is coming to Burnet next year

Wildfire evacuations in Central Texas this week and concerns about rising sea levels reshaping the Texas coastline.

The Texas Standard’s Sean Saldaña shares the latest unemployment numbers and what they tell us about the economic shape Texas is in.

A new alliance of automakers is going to take on Tesla’s charging standard.

A Texas-sized theme party is planned to welcome the total solar eclipse coming next year.

Plus the week in politics with the Texas Tribune.

2024 Senate race comes into focus as Gutierrez announces candidacy

In a second special session, Texas House and Senate leaders reach a deal on property tax relief. What does it add up to?

State Sen. Roland Gutierrez has announced his candidacy for U.S. Senate, making him the second high-profile Democrat – along with Rep. Colin Allred – to challenge Sen. Ted Cruz.

How Texas has become a ground zero for self-driving trucks, with word that driverless semi runs between Dallas and Houston could become a regular thing as soon as next year.

We’ll get the rundown on a legal battle between a group of nuns and a bishop in North Texas.

And a quick cooldown at a Texas ice house.

The future of TikTok hinges on ‘Project Texas’

Another tragedy in Uvalde, this one involving human smuggling. We’ll have the details on events there and in Eagle Pass that left three dead over the weekend.

Crowds are expected at the state Capitol this week as lawmakers take up several bills involving the treatment of transgender Texans.

What does it mean for Texas to blacklist a bank, especially at a time when the industry is so volatile?

“Project Texas” could be central to preventing a U.S. TikTok ban. But what is it exactly?

And why is a Texas school district considering leaving a statewide organization of school boards that until now has had 100% participation from public districts in the state?

Texas Standard: October 27, 2022

As a new poll points to a tightening race for Texas Governor, a focus on an issue considered one of the biggest. We’ll talk about how immigration and border security have been front and center in the contest between Republican incumbent governor Greg Abbott and democratic challenger Beto O’Rourke. Also with disinformation and misinformation rampant, the Standard’s Michael Marks on how to be a smart news consumer. And rising prices, rising wages. But not all paychecks rising at the same rate. Sean Saldana with more. And the southern second person plural that one writer now calls the most inclusive of all pronouns. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 18, 2022

With Texas’ new abortion trigger law set to take effect a week from today, what’s the history of abortion regulation in Texas? We’ll take a look. Other stories we’re tracking: as Texas students return to the classroom, how security has become a central issue this fall. Also home security becomes TV show fodder as the ubiquitous Ring camera gets ready for its closeup. And the rust belt, the Bible belt, now another belt added to the U.S. map and Texas is part of it: what the new heat belt tells us about who’s feeling the greatest effects of rising temperatures. And a later than usual peach season for some. We’ll hear why and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 2, 2022

As Governor Abbott weighs the possibility of declaring an invasion at the southern border, legal challenges over immigration policy pile up. We’ll have details. Also growing calls for a European embargo of Russian oil and the ripple effects felt closer to home. And a medical mystery in south Texas as health officials warn of a rash of pediatric hepatitis cases in young kids, sometimes necessitating liver transplants. We’ll talk with a specialist from UT Health San Antonio. And a production in Fort Worth bearing witness to racist violence against Black people blurring the boundaries between actors and audiences. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 16, 2021

South Texas switcheroo: for the first time in a decade, a Texas lawmaker changes parties. A harbinger of other political changes? We’ll have more on representative Ryan Guillen’s decision to leave the democratic party, and what if anything it says about a changing political climate in a region where democrats have long been dominant. Also, Gromer Jeffers of the Dallas Morning News counts down the 5 things to look for as we approach primary season 2022. And community colleges in demand to help train workers. But where’s the money coming from? And a program to help formerly incarcerated women find jobs in technology. All that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 9, 2021

Democrats and Republicans agree the U.S. needs to figure out immigration. But what exactly does that mean and how do we get there? We’ll explore. Also, gun policy at the Texas legislature. We’ll look at what passed and what didn’t. And what’s in the bills Governor Abbott just signed to address problems with the electric grid? Plus one view from Texas about the ongoing coronavirus crisis in India. And we’ll take a look at what researchers call the seven threads of Texas. Where do you fit into the fabric of the state? Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 30, 2021

As the Texas Senate votes to force power generators to better prepare for weather extremes, new insights on what Texans actually want. A new University of Houston hobby school survey on the impact of the February freeze and power outages, and how Texans want the system to change. Also more on an 8 billion dollar plan being pitched to Texas lawmakers that promises a 7 day power backup in the event of future emergencies. And as vaccines are rolled out in Texas prisons, a new report card on how well lockups and juvenile facilities in Texas have tracked the spread of COVID-19. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: December 8, 2020

He is set to become, if not a household name, a statewide presence in politics: just who is Dade Phelan and why should everyday Texans care? We’ll explain. Also, by court order, the Trump administration says it has restored the deferred deportation program called DACA. But recipients remain fearful of its future. Also the change in Texas law that left some Texas cities, hard hit by the pandemic with fewer hospitals than they used to have. And questions raised about why so many c-sections concentrated at certain Texas hospitals? Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: February 19, 2020

Democrats duke it out over who’s best to battle John Cornyn: Bob Garrett of the Dallas Morning News will join us with the takeaways from debate night. Plus, the one presidential candidate striking fear in the hearts of some Texas democratic politicos. Here’s a hint: he’s a democrat. Also, using federal gun laws to help battle domestic violence. Plus a new report on widespread flaring in west Texas: how bad is it, and will it lead to tightening regulations? Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 7, 2019

Women and children killed in northern Mexico. Questions remain about whether they were targeted and what happens next. That massacre in Mexico an example of the violence asylum-seekers from the country say they need to get away from. We’ll have a report. Plus, the state’s most populous county had big delays in election results. A dispute over who and what is to blame. And something you do everyday could be contributing to the population decline of monarch butterflies. We’ll explain. All those stories and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 19, 2019

A partial win for the Trump administration’s new rule for asylum is affecting thousands of people on the other side of the Texas Mexico divide. We’ll take a look at whats happening. Other stories we’re covering: a ransomware attack paralyses 23 government computer systems statewide. Could it have been prevented? One expert says absolutely. Also, a man set to be executed by Texas this week. It’s his sixth scheduled execution date. Why questions about his actual innocence have haunted the courts for almost two decades. Those stories and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 4, 2019

There’s a long list of Democratic Presidential candidates. Two from Texas, but only one Texan is now among the top 5 candidates. We’ll have the story. Also, in this, the land of the free, how one man found true freedom even as he is behind bars. Plus how can camp create positive memories for children who are homeless? U.T. Dallas may have found a way, we’ll explore. And linguistics and Baseball. Excuse me, what? Don’t worry, we have a Texan Translation for you! And, scoot closer to the radio because we are about to talk scooters: the good, the bad and the ugly. That and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 20, 2019

Where there’s smoke there’s, a lack of oversight? Calls for greater accountability in the aftermath of fires in the nation’s petrochemical capitol. Plus, a year and a half after the deadly mass shooting at Sutherland Springs a new chapter opens for the church and the community, we’ll take a look. Also, the difficulty of getting closure after the death of a loved one. Why it may be taking longer here in Texas. And at what price Whataburger? 6 billion dollars? The iconic Texas brand explores a possible sale. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 26, 2018

The Texas Attorney General is now getting involved in a court fight over whether Texas school children should be required to say the pledge of allegiance, we’ll explore the implications. Also, should toothless inmates in Texas be provided dentures? Right now, many are not. We’ll take a look at the policy some say needs to change. And something that may be in your garage or shed right now could be contributing to the decline in the bee population. We’ll take a look. Plus, speaking of bees, we’ll get the goods on honey. What is it exactly? We’ll hear from our insect expert. Plus, tracking especially high rates of asthma in Dallas. All that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 28, 2018

After NAFTA, now what? The president says a new trade deal with Mexico doesn’t need Canada along for the ride. What does it mean for Texas? We’ll take a look. Also, for only the second time ever, Texas politicians assemble to drum up support from the state’s disability community. Who’s saying what and do prospective voters like what they’re hearing? And Beto and Ted’s excellent adventure: why a filmmaker is turing a midterm Battle Royale into a motion picture. And starving in the Texas suburbs: hidden hunger and the effort to address it. Plus prehistoric insects buggin the Lone Star State? Those stories and so much more on today’s Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 15, 2018

Nebraska uses opioids to execute a condemned killer. We’ll take a look at what this might mean in America’s most active death penalty state. Also, a deadly bridge collapse in Italy and a stark reminder about infrastructure warnings closer to home. What’s being done? What’s the state of overpasses in Texas? You might be surprised by the answer. And much of rural Texas may be a book desert, but relief may be coming soon. Plus no fiery hail or frogs from the sky but crickets landing in biblical proportions in East Texas? We’ll hear what’s happening and why. And where’s Kinky? The return of the Texas offender and sometime gubernatorial candidate. Those stories and a whole lot more on today’s Texas Standard: