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Texas Standard: February 9, 2021

An historic trial in the senate as the second impeachment of Donald Trump gets underway. We’ll look at the mechanics of the process and Texas’ role. Also, he was a newspaper columnist who became well known in North Texas politics and eventually- a U.S. congressman. More on the passing of Ron Wright and what comes next. And thousands of dollars for a single COVID-19 test? Lawmakers being asked to look into charges at freestanding ERs. We’ll also hear from a woman who made it her mission to deliver free fruits and veggies to communities with fewer healthy options. During this pandemic, her deliveries now more crucial than ever. All of that and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: February 8, 2021

As the White House prepares for new directives in border enforcement, Texas democratic lawmakers push for immigrant rights changes.Coming up, our conversation with Texas representative Mary Gonzales on how democrats in the Texas legislature plan to press colleagues over immigration rights. Also in a part of Texas that’s long complained of air pollution and a lack of official response, communities are banding together to get things done. We’ll have a report from Houston. And oil demand still down, so way are gasoline prices on the rise? Plus a new Juneteenth mural that promises to be more than just a work of art. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 20, 2021

The beginning of a new chapter and a new era. With change coming to Washington, what are the implications closer to home? On this presidential inauguration day, what are the priorities for the 46th chief executive of the united states and what do they add up to for Texas? Coming up, we’ll hear from Texas experts, scholars and reporters on subjects ranging from what to expect when it comes to changes to environmental policy, immigration and asylum, the economy including the trillion dollar student loan debt crisis, dealing with the ongoing pandemic, and much more on a special edition of the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: December 8, 2020

He is set to become, if not a household name, a statewide presence in politics: just who is Dade Phelan and why should everyday Texans care? We’ll explain. Also, by court order, the Trump administration says it has restored the deferred deportation program called DACA. But recipients remain fearful of its future. Also the change in Texas law that left some Texas cities, hard hit by the pandemic with fewer hospitals than they used to have. And questions raised about why so many c-sections concentrated at certain Texas hospitals? Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 23, 2020

Cars line up for miles outside food banks in our big cities. On this Thanksgiving week, the state of food insecurity in the state of Texas. As many Texans prepare for a big Thanksgiving dinner, others struggle with the choice of whether to leave the lights on or put food on the table. We’ll explore. Meanwhile health officials worry that holiday gatherings could become super spreader events. We’ll hear about the push for safety precautions to combat COVID-19 as case numbers rise statewide. Plus as national media focuses on the Latino vote, the case that the Tejano vote could be a better indicator. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 20, 2020

Is the presidential contest still a real contest? Texas’ senior senator says it’s still too close to call, we’ll have the latest. Also, he pledged to heal the soul of the nation, but when it comes to immigration, some wonder why that topic doesn’t make it too Joe Biden’s top 5 list of policy priorities. We’ll hear about the concerns of advocates of immigration reform. And airlines may be hard hit by the pandemic, but some Texas towns with ties to the skies are taking off. We’ll hear why. Plus the week in Texas politics with the Texas Tribune and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 19, 2020

As a new wave of COVID-19 cases sweeps across the state, a strikingly different response from Governor Abbott compared to the last statewide surge. We’ll hear what health experts are saying. Also, more on an emergency treatment approved by the FDA. And as those cases rise, a test of faith for some Catholics called back to the pews. And a forthcoming vote on a new sex education curriculum Texas LGBTQ advocates say falls far short. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 10, 2020

He is a major political figure who has yet to publicly recognize Joe Biden’s victory in the general election. But he’s not a republican hold out, either. Texas democrats upset that the president of Mexico, a country often seen as maligned by President Trump, is reluctant to accept the outcome of the U.S. general elections. We’ll explore why not. Also, this is the season for the Texas legislature: packages calling for voting reform and more land at the capitol in the run up to the next session. And NASA says to a company in Midland with big plans for space. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 26, 2020

Coronavirus case numbers exploding in El Paso. We’ll look at how the city is trying to treat patients as hospitals reach capacity. Also, just over a week left to Election Day and it’s far from just the Presidential race on the ballot. We’ll highlight one sheriff’s race that’s heating up. Plus, transitioning from oil is something even the oil companies are thinking about. We’ll learn today why hydrogen might be a clean, but not so simple, option. And remembering Jerry Jeff Walker. Texas troubadour, Cosmic Cowboy, and misbehaving musician. Those stories plus a local debate over masks, a spooky anthology and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 23, 2020

News of the first FDA-approved COVID-19 treatment comes at a time when cases in Texas are starting to spike. We’ll explore the details and what’s next. And: Did you get a chance to watch the presidential debate last night? What are your thoughts? We’ll have a recap. Also: A new documentary about the life of Horton Foote who won an Oscar for his screenplay adaptation of “To Kill a Mockingbird”. Plus: The week in Texas politics with our friends from The Texas Tribune and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 22, 2020

Across the Lone Star State, Texans expected to be tuning in tonight for political fireworks show, but what about policies? We’ll set the stage for a final debate. Plus, Texans looking for unemployment benefits will soon have to once again prove they’re looking for work, but what constitutes a work search in the eyes of Texas officials? We’ll take a closer look. And in Collin county, it’s the academy versus free speech as a professors’ tweet roils a college campus. And a freeze frame on a music scene almost forgotten from 40 years back. Plus, fake news for real? A warning about a rising force in local news that has experts advising don’t believe everything you read. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 25, 2020

Setting the stage for the next legislative session, Governor Abbott proposes new sanctions he says aimed at shoring up police. We’ll hear more on what battles appear to loom for lawmakers: from Coronavirus cutbacks to issues surrounding policing and protests. Also a Texan brews up a beer proclaiming Black is Beautiful. And its going down better than even he expected. And with the announcement of a Supreme Court nominee imminent, judicial philosophy and gender politics. Plus the week that was with the Texas Tribune and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 15, 2020

No other state has shown as many cracks in its system of counting COVID-19 cases as Texas. Now the numbers are set to shift again. Why is Texas having such trouble with Coronavirus case counts? Edgar Walters of the Texas Tribune has the latest. Also, a plan for affordable housing gets slammed as a tax windfall for developers, we’ll hear why. And an indigenous tribe pushes the University of Texas to hand over Native American remains. Plus the ultimate how to book for those ready to leave it all behind: How to Astronaut. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 26, 2020

Residents of the northern part of the Texas gulf coast prepare for the worst as Hurricane Laura approaches, gathering speed. Overnight, hurricane Laura intensified 70 percent, approaching category 4 as it neared the coastal border of Louisiana and Texas. Many cities have been evacuated, we’ll be checking in with the mayor pro-tem of Galveston, who says residents there are bracing from a storm similar to Hurricane Ike. Also a major beef between Harvard and Texas A&M as the two institutions engage in a public food fight over the safety of eating meat. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 6, 2020

Republicans versus Republican. Five conservative lawmakers are suing the Governor, over contracts for Coronavirus tracking. At issue: a nearly 300 million dollar deal for contact tracing that five state lawmakers say should have been vetted by the legislature, but wasn’t. Also, remember that border wall that dominated the last general election. Three miles of private wall built by Trump supporters is already coming down and mother nature’s playing a role. Plus the fight over facial recognition heats up. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 26, 2020

Political conventions are planned out years in advance, so why are people suddenly talking about the GOP convention coming to Texas this summer? We’ll explain. Plus, questions raised over a 295 million dollar contract for contact tracing to fight the spread of Coronavirus in Texas, also efforts for contact tracing at the border. And its t-minus one day and counting: Space City watching closely as Elon Musk’s Space X prepares for an historic crewed launch. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 28, 2020

Stay at home has done its job, but it’s getting to be time to get back to work, says Governor Abbott. We’ll take a look at the blueprint for the incremental re-opening of Texas. Plus the role of testing and contact tracing. Also, how a city that brands itself the wedding capital of the world hopes to outlast the wedding bell blues brought on by COVID-19 concerns. And from bluebonnets to blue light, screen time in Texas under quarantine. Is too much still considered too much? Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 16, 2020

As many jobs lost in the past month as all those created since the great recession, now Texas hospitals struggling to make ends meet, we’ll have the latest. Other stories were tracking: the oil and gas industry asking for more state regulation? More on an historic hearing aimed at trying to stop a downward spiral. Also, one place where business is good? Check in with some factories on the Texas Mexico border. And the Texas governor set to talk about plans aimed at getting back to business. A top pandemic expert at Texas A&M has a warning. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 1, 2020

The governor issues new orders on social distancing. Just don’t call em shelter in place. We’ll take a closer look at the packaging of a statewide pandemic response. And religious gathers now considered essential in the Lone Star State. Patrick Svitek of the Texas Tribune with more on the Governor’s latest guidelines. Also rapid turnaround deportations. How the Coronavirus crisis has changed the rules at the U.S. Mexico border. And stay at home-schooling tips from homeschooling veterans. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 24, 2020

The state’s top financial officer tells lawmakers to brace for impact. Our conversation with Comptroller Glenn Hager. With more shelter in place orders kicking in, the state’s Comptroller says he’s seeing a major hit to Texas coffers as a result of the Coronavirus crisis. But how big a hit and what can be done? We’ll explore. Plus museums statewide try to deal with a drop off in foot traffic, virtually. And is it possible a sticker could help stop the spread of pathogens? West Texas researchers see quite a market. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard: