time

Asymmetry: Past & Future

Dating back to when we were kids, two weeks into the future seems a lot longer than two weeks in the past. Even as adults we know two weeks is the same length regardless of when it takes place and yet we still experience this asymmetrical mindset.

In this episode of Two Guys on Your HeadDr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke discuss asymmetry between the past and future.

Time

Time flies when you’re having fun, the old saying goes. But how can time – maybe the most fundamental concept of the universe – feel different under different conditions?

On this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman, and Dr. Bob Duke – break down the factors influencing our perception of time.

Older Than I’ve Ever Been

Time can be cruel, and depressing, even. But it offers so many metaphors. That was the inspiration for this Typewriter Rodeo poem

Being Late

Have you ever wondered why some people are always punctual, even early, and other are perpetually late? In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about some of the psychology behind synchronizing our cultural and personal “clocks”, and how to put yourself in a less anxious space no matter who you are.

 

Daylight Saving Time

Sunday we gained an hour of sleep. With the time change also came some cooler Texas weather. David Fruchter says he used that as inspiration for this week’s poem.

Summer and Time

In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about organizing time to make the most of time off.

V&B: Time

Time is the substance I am made of. Time is a river which sweeps me along, but I am the river; it is a tiger which destroys me, but I am the tiger; it is a fire which consumes me, but I am the fire.” –Jorge Luis Borge

What is time? How can rhythm and time phrases bring us into a dialogue with the past? and  how much of our relationship to and our knowledge of time is driven by our intuition? Listen back as KUT’s Rebecca McInroy talks with: cosmologist and astrologer, Kerrie Welch;  jazz drummer Brannen Temple; and astrophysicist and psychology professor, David Gilden about Time.

How Our Brains Process Time

Time flies when you’re having fun, the old saying goes. But how can time – maybe the most fundamental concept of the universe – feel different under different conditions? Our brains perceive time differently in different circumstances. When we pay close attention to something, tedium can set in and it can feel like time slows to a crawl. Conversely, if our lives demand we juggle several different things at once, we tend to pay less attention to some activities – and time races by in a flash.