Teaching

How Texas lowering requirements to become a teacher in the 2000s impacted the profession

As the first week of a fourth special session draws to a close, the Senate passes a voucher-like plan for education.

A teacher shortage and what a new study tells us about the implications of past plans to bring in and retain teachers in Texas classrooms.

The independent market monitor for the Texas power grid steps down after blowing the whistle on what she claims were artificially inflated energy prices.

Texas, once a red-hot housing market, has lost a lot of sizzle, yet many still struggle to get a house of their own. We’ll take a closer look at what’s happening.

Plus, the week in politics with the Texas Tribune and poetry with the Typewriter Rodeo.

Auto workers’ strike hits Arlington plant

A plan to boost payments to retired teachers will be up to Texas voters next month. We’ll have the backstory and details on Proposition 9.

Five thousand union workers walked off the job at the Arlington General Motors plant, which builds some of GM’s most profitable vehicles.
College football pay to play? Not OK, says the NCAA. Yet an investigation of recruitment shows how officials look the other way – and it’s happening a lot in Texas.

And just in time for Halloween, something wicked is coming to Garland: A celebration of Texas’ role in the horror film genre.

Texas Standard: September 6, 2021

Texas 2nd special session of the year is over. And a new opinion poll suggests the result is not a necessarily good look for Governor Abbott. If critics were correct that the Governor’s legislative agenda was an effort to win over Texans prior to his reelection campaign, it hasn’t quite worked out as a net positive for him, if a new opinion poll is correct. What’s behind Governor Abbott’s highest ever disapproval numbers? Also, the Pentagon says a Texan was among the last U.S. service members to die in Afghanistan We’ll hear from the widow of another soldier killed in the attack on Kabul airport. Plus a call for a rethink of the American military and more today on the Texas Standard:

Dr. Valerie Hill-Jackson (Ep. 10, 2016)

This week, In Black America producer and host John L. Hanson, Jr. speaks with Dr. Valerie Hill-Jackson, a Clinical Professor at Texas A&M University and author of a study examining the declining numbers of African American teachers in the nation’s public schools.

Texas Standard: July 3, 2017

Salacious emails from a former Baylor University regent about victims of sexual assaults spark outrage. We’ll explore how they tie in. Also special courts for cops: a new law on the books creates diversion programs for first responders. Why counties are hesitant to set them up. Also the cochineal, a small Spanish insect and the source of the red dye in many foods we eat, the makeup we use and the focus of a new Texas art exhibit. And faced with a 19% unemployment rate, some Spaniards are looking for ways to boost their resume. Those stories and so much today on the Texas Standard:

Higher Ed: Teachers and Teaching

Teachers. We’ve all had some great ones, and we’ve all had some teachers who didn’t rank among the best. What makes a good teacher? How has the profession changed over time? How has technology impacted the way teachers do their jobs? In this week’s episode of KUT’s podcast Higher Ed, KUT’s Jennifer Stayton and Southwestern University President Dr. Ed Burger talk about the evolving role of teachers. Ed has taught Math for about 30 years so he has lots to say about what he thinks teachers can do to reach and inspire their students. He and Jennifer reminisce about some memorable teachers they have had and discuss the ways in which the profession has changed. Listen on to hear some classroom tales and to get the new puzzler which, by the way, happens to involve a mean Math teacher.

This episode was recorded on March 24, 2017.

Higher Ed: Moving From Student to Teacher

Usually during KUT’s podcast Higher Ed, KUT’s Jennifer Stayton and Southwestern University President Dr. Ed Burger discuss issues related to learning and education. So how does it turn out when they add another voice to the mix? In this episode, they are joined by second-year Southwestern University student Tristin Evans. She adds a student perspective to the discussion and talks about what it was like to move from being a student to being a teacher’s assistant in one of Dr. Burger’s classes. Ed teaches a class at Southwestern called “Effective Thinking and Creative Puzzle-Solving.” Tristin has taken the class and then transitioned into a role assisting him with the course. Ed and Jennifer talked with Tristin about what she learned in switching positions and what advice she has for younger learners (or really learners of any age). Hear their discussion and also the solution to the numbers-filled puzzler from the last episode. Good news – there’s more than one way to get the solution!

This episode was recorded on March 24, 2017.

Texas Standard: November 25, 2016

Improving education: a lot of Texans know the talk, but a Texas lawmaker walk the walk. We’ll meet him and hear his strategy. Plus as mainstream media continues to wrestle with how they got the election so wrong, what’s next? How the events and the outcome of campaign 2016 translate for tomorrow’s journalists. Plus free stuff. Anybody up for that? Viral videos claim to teach consumers how to get expensive high tech goodies without paying. We’ll explore the truth behind the claims. Also a conversation with one of the Lone Star State’s best known film makers: Richard Linklater. Plus the week in Texas politics and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 8, 2016

After long lines for early voting how goes it on Election day? We’ll check in with reporter. Plus there are some election stories unfolding today you won’t be seeing in mainstream media coverage. Coming up, the promises made to politicians decades ago over election day reporting…and how that affects what we’re learning about the results and why. Also, doctors? Vets? The milkman? Who makes house calls anymore? To an increasing extent in Texas the answer is teachers. Plus top stories of 2016 anyone? We’ll explore the news that got lost in the noise of an unusually ugly campaign season. All that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Dyslexia

Experts estimate that between 15 and 20 percent of the general population has dyslexia in some form. Reading and writing are different experiences for those with the language-based learning disability – and we learn more about it all the time.