Permian Basin

Texas Standard: July 1, 2020

In what would normally be the height of the summer season for Corpus Christi, new restrictions go into effect. But do they go far enough? Our conversation with the mayor of Corpus Christi as regional ICU bed space reaches single digit levels, and also an update on the situation in Dallas. Plus a surprising backyard trend during the pandemic: and why it has some Texans crying fowl over the mesh of rules. And another profile in one of the key races during primary runoff season plus a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 13, 2020

This is not a test. As Texas responds to a pandemic, health officials struggle to find ways to deal with a lag in Coronavirus testing, we’ll have the latest. Plus in major cities across the Lone Star State, city streets, schools and universities and office buildings getting empty. Events from rodeos to concerts and games all cancelled or in the process of. So what comes next? Our conversation with the top official of the most populous county in Texas, judge Lina Hidalgo…Plus the politics of quarantine and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: December 26, 2019

The most powerful factor in the Texas economy? Energy. This hour, we’ll explore how changes out west are affecting the entire landscape of the Lone Star State. They used to call it the fracking boom. New technologies that made it possible to extract more oil and gas from the ground. Texas’ Permian Basin has become the most productive patch of petroleum development in the U.S. leading some to suggest the endless cycle of boom and bust may be over. What happens in west Texas affects us all, so what’s next? That’s our focus in Untapped: a Special Edition of the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 7, 2019

Election day draws near, perhaps nearer than most Texans think. We’ll take a closer look at what Texas voters are being asked to decide this November. Also, it’s a Texas border more dangerous than the one that gets the lion’s share of attention. How a boom in the Permian has made for perilous times along the line with New Mexico. And missing notes rediscovered: a long forgotten manuscript recounting the story of how the blues came to Texas, revived after decades in limbo. Also the effort to clamp down on the dangerous storage of firearms. All that and then some today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 20, 2019

At least two dead, nearly 4 feet of rain and some parts of southeast Texas calling it worse than Hurricane Harvey. Our own Michael Marks joins us with the latest on tropical storm Imelda’s toll in Texas. Also, you’ve heard the phrase ‘it takes a village’, but to go to Mars? Why SpaceX is offering to buy an entire south Texas community. And Houston says Howdy Modi as the Indian Prime Minister makes Texas a centerpiece of his U.S. visit. Plus the week in Texas politics with the Texas Tribune and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 24, 2019

Up to 1000 more Texas National Guard troops could soon deploy to the border. But will they be effective? We’ll take a closer look. Also, rebuilding smaller after Harvey. For some it might not be a choice. We’ll explore. Plus, thanks to the Permian Oil boom the U.S. is in a different position as tensions with Iran escalate. But does it really make a difference? We’ll take a closer look. And we’ll hear from the former Ambassador to the Dominican Republic about problems on the Island, and whether you should delay your trip. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 19, 2019

The President launches his re-election bid. How strong is his support in Texas? Who do Texas Democrats favor in 2020? A new UT-Texas Tribune poll offers an updated snapshot of where Texans stand on a variety of political matters as we head into the next election cycle. We’ll break down the findings. Also some claim that the cycle of boom and bust in oil country is a relic of the past. Is it? We’ll take a closer look. And claims about high maternal mortality rates in Texas: The governor says they’re lying. But what does Politifact say? Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 10, 2019

It’s a new rule designed to answer concerns about sex abuse in the Catholic church, although some victims say it’s nowhere near enough. We’ll have the latest. And do you remember acid rain? Problems in the Permian with a new warning from a national environmental group says recent reports by the energy industry itself indicate dangerous and illegal amounts of sulphur dioxide in west Texas, we’ll take a look. And so so-called good samaritans at the border with Mexico arrested. Those stories and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 15, 2019

Texas is now flaring off enough natural gas to power all of households in the Lone Star State. Can anything be done to harness the energy? We’ll take a look. Also, the Texas legislature is stuck: once again stalled on some key issues. Time to prepare for a special session, Ross Ramsey doesn’t seem too worried. We’ll ask with the co-founder of the Texas Tribune why not. And after several decades, the University of North Texas solves the case of the missing Hobbit… first edition, that is. Plus the battle of San Jacinto that wasn’t, at least not this year. That and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: December 10, 2018

The White House Chief of Staff is leaving. The president’s being cagey about the reasons, but there were clear signs this was coming. Earlier this year, NPR’s Texas based correspondent John Burnett landed an exclusive interview with John Kelly, and there were signs of a rupture with his boss even then. Coming up John Burnett joins us to talk about a break long in the making. Also, the Victoria Advocate sues to stop former congressman Blake Farenthold from collecting his paycheck as a lobbyist, we’ll hear why. And the Texas Ag commissioner wants to let farmers grow hemp. Those stories and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 10, 2018

As a Category 4 hurricane bears down on the Florida panhandle, parts of Texas Hill Country try to recover from flash flooding. Also, after family separations at the border, a new concern grows: an AP investigation finds deported parents in danger of losing kids to U.S. adoption. Plus, do student athletes have a fundamental right to be protected from concussions? We’ll hear of a closely watched civil rights lawsuit filed by parents of an injured player. And a claim from the campaign trail: is marijuana really legal in most states? We run it by Politifact. All that and more, today on the Texas Standard.

Texas Standard: June 25, 2018

Are Texas election maps racially gerrymandered, designed to dilute minority vote? It’s a case that’s been 7 years in the making: a challenge to Texas’ redistricting maps claiming that when those lines were drawn, the intent was racially discriminatory, Unconstitutional. A lower court agreed with the plaintiffs, but today the US supreme court overturned that ruling in all but one district. What does this decision really mean? Who’s affected? And what does this mean for the midterms if anything?
That’s just our top story on this Monday, but we’ve got a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: December 26, 2017

It was the biggest weather disaster in Texas history: this hour we’re exploring how it changed the contours of the lone star state. We’re retracing Hurricane Harvey’s path through southeast Texas, and the long and winding road to recovery. From Port Aransas to Houston and the golden triangle, it’s the story of a storm which the weather service warned would have no precedent, but Texans came together in ways large and small, helping strangers in need, and finding new ways forward. On this day after Christmas, we’re reconsidering an event that changed Texas in countless ways:

Texas Standard: November 14, 2017

How many reports of sexual harassment have been filed against Texas house and Senate members? The number might surprise you. As Texas’ US senators pull their endorsement of Alabama republican senate candidate Roy Moore, new allegations emerge that hit much closer to home. Alexa Ura of the Texas Tribune on what their team is finding about sexual harassment and assault under the so-called pink dome. Also, compounding pharmacies across Texas coming under federal scrutiny for dispensing deadly cocktails laced with kickbacks and charged to taxpayers, we’ll explore. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 15, 2017

The risk to lives now reduced if not completely eliminated as we enter the next phase post Harvey. Did pre-storm preparations pay off? We’ll explore. Also after 81 years: a crane removed a giant monument to confederate general Robert E Lee from a Dallas park. And today: word that no less senior an official than governor Abbott himself will meet to discuss the fate of other confederate memorials, namely those on the capitol grounds. A turning point? We’ll have the latest. Those stories and lots more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 23, 2017

Texas billionaire Ross Perot once warned of a giant sucking sound. Today: a stunning vindication? We’ll explore. Plus, what’s called school choice, set to explode as a front page issue this week. As lawmakers make it a top priority, how’s it supposed to work exactly? We’ll have a crash course. Also, what appears to be the first Texas showdown now set over so-called sanctuary cities. And a stunning shift by the Texas supreme court clears the way for a challenge to gay marriage. Why a nation with some of the toughest gun laws in the world may be having a change of heart. Those stories and a whole lot more, turn it up, cause it’s Texas Standard time: