Forensic

Texas Standard: December 16, 2021

Texas’ 35 billion infrastructure dollars: Governor Abbott is warning state agencies think twice before taking the money. Why? We’ll explore. Also, as Texans wrap up holiday gathering plans, health care workers report a rise in COVID-19 cases. We’re checking in with Amarillo where the hospitalization rate is rising fast. And our go to Tech expert Omar Gallaga with a smart home gift guide. Plus a Texas TV journalist on more than half a century behind the scenes, or reporting live from the scene, finally telling his own story. Our conversation with Neal Spelce about his new memoir and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: December 15, 2021

With the window now closed for names to go on the primary ballot for statewide races in 2022, what are we learning about the state of Texas politics? We’ll take a look. Other stories we’re covering, in a state with more military bases than any other except California: active duty service members reach big deadline for covid vaccinations. Also some state’s call it junk science, but in Texas courts it can be called admissible evidence. We’ll have more on the history of what’s called forensic hypnosis. And many Texans in mourning this week over death of a man who was more than a soaring tenor but a cultural icon as well. Remembering Vicente Fern├índez and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: December 14, 2021

All politics is local, the saying goes…but hyperpartisan, too? How the TX landscape is changing for local and school board races. Republicans in Potter County, home to Amarillo say they’ll conduct their own primary without the help of election officials and they’re urging other Texas counties to do the same. We’ll have the latest. Plus Texans sparked a lithium battery revolution, now another Texas breakthrough that could lead to something more sustainable and stable. And a critically acclaimed Texas trio hits it big, inspired by the sounds of Houston. Our conversation with the members of Khruangbin and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 6, 2019

Citing a crisis, border officials say they will cut off funding for anything not directly necessary for the protection of life and safety in U.S. shelters. Officials tell the operators of resettlement shelters to end English classes, recreation programs and other services because there isn’t the money to pay for it. We’ll take a closer look. Also, concerns about suicide among farmers and a new effort to reach out across rural Texas. Plus, what voting data tells us about just how far to the right and left our own lawmakers really are. Those stories and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 12, 2016

A showdown between republicans, one from Florida, another from Texas, leaves question marks over the future of US foreign policy. We’ll explore. Also, does former Exxon chief Rex Tillerson have the moral clarity to be the next secretary of state? A firsthand account from capitol hill. Plus the Texas democratic lawmaker facing possible criminal charges who promised to resign, now refusing to ride off into the sunset. And thousands of texans getting taken for a ride over loans they never took out. And flying cars: could this be the year? Our digital guru gets real about what to expect from tech in 2017. Those stories and much much more today on the Texas Standard: