Earthquake

Coral samples in Galveston could be key to keeping the species alive

On the eve of early voting, Alexandra Samuels of Texas Monthly and Mark Jones of the Baker Institute at Rice University share a closer look at some of the big contests Texas voters will see on their primary ballots.

We’ll hear about what happened when reporters for the Houston Chronicle began mapping where tickets are being issued to people experiencing homelessness there.

Amid mounting threats from climate change, scientists at Moody Gardens in Galveston are caring for 150 coral fragments from five species to keep them alive.

Anyone up for barbecue – for breakfast? BBQ journalist Daniel Vaughn has some prime tips.

Why Texans can’t vote on abortion or marijuana anytime soon

The fourth largest earthquake on record in Texas struck Wednesday out west, renewing concerns about fracking and seismic activity. Erin Douglas of the Texas Tribune with more on yesterday’s temblor and what researchers and regulators are saying about it.

The latest on a runoff for mayor in Texas’ biggest city.
In San Antonio, plans to close several public schools getting pushback from communities targeted for closure.

The economics of electric vehicles: Is the race to EVs losing power?

And voters in Ohio approve ballot measures on abortion and marijuana this week. Why such measures aren’t likely to land on Texas ballots anytime soon.

Texas Standard: November 21, 2022

‘Tis the season for bill filing; a quick look at what filing season in the Texas legislature tells us about lawmaker priorities for the coming session. Other stories we’re watching: an earthquake recorded in west Texas last week, the third biggest ever recorded in the state, what it could mean for the oil and gas industry. And a nuclear reactor taking shape on the campus of Abilene Christian University, we’ll hear why. Also how military families are trying to deal with the search for suitable housing. These stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 19, 2018

A political upset in Texas: a Democrat friendly district picks a Republican to fill a vacated seat less than two months out from the midterms. On top of last night’s Republican win by Pete Flores over Pete Gallego for a vacated state Senate seat, new numbers suggest that tight contest between Ted Cruz and Beto O’Rourke might not be so tight after all. We’ll take a closer look. Also, as frustration grows over rising student debt in higher ed: Texas’ top ranked private university announces free tuition room and board, for those who qualify. And the sixth Rolling Stone, Texas’ own in the spotlight. All that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 13, 2018

Hurricane Florence bears down on the Carolinas. But closer to home, officials in south Texas claim after flooding there they got stiffed by FEMA, we’ll have the latest. Also, we thought there are big discrepancies in health care for minorities, but now the agency examining those inequities nixed. We’ll hear why and what it means. And a year after a major quake in Mexico city killing more than 300: a new report blames corruption for many of the buildings that toppled. We’ll have details of the investigation. Plus tighten those crash helmets: Texas cities on a collision course with electric scooters. Those stories and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: December 6, 2017

No democrat has been elected to statewide office since 1994. But the state’s first openly Gay Hispanic Sheriff says she’s ready to be Governor. It had been rumored that Dallas county sheriff Lupe Valdez was mulling a bid to challenge Governor Greg Abbott, but now that the shoe has dropped. Do Democrats have a serious contender? We’ll explore. Also, a Texas police department takes aim at the Grinch offering an alternative to leaving holiday parcels on the front porch. And it started in Chicago, got revived in Austin, and has gone global: the story of the real life roller derby queens. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 29, 2017

Midterms aren’t usually the most exciting elections, but there’s a whole lotta shakin goin on: political turnover our top story today. Also, more than 30 quakes this year in and around Pecos, more than all recorded there in the past ten years put together. We’ll ask why. Plus, the university of Texas, landing soon in New Mexico? Or maybe Texas A&M? Details of the forthcoming battle for Los Alamos and whether there’s a Rick Perry factor. And as the hurricane season draws to a close, voices from a storm more than a hundred years ago that forever changed the Lone Star State. That and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 21, 2017

Two major earthquakes south of the border in the course of two weeks. Should Texans be worried about our tectonic ties to Mexico? We’ll explore. Also, a new battlefront in the debate over just how separate church and state are in the US, and Texas’ Harvey experience is a big part of that discussion, we’ll hear why. Plus the head honcho of the Texas house, Joe Straus has filed for reelection, but a veteran political watcher says the speaker of the house may not return as many think. We’ll hear why and what speaker Straus is and is not saying about the matter. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 20, 2017

7.1 on the Richter Scale: a deadly earthquake in central Mexico on the anniversary of a historic temblor. We’ll take you to Mexico city this hour. Also, the military plane is designated for TX and it could be a shot in the arm for you know where, we’ll have the story. Plus Ken Paxton says president Obama tried to confer citizenship status on daca recipients: Politifact Texas looks into that claim. And they say that news is the first draft of history. Now comes an important second draft you might say, with an exploration of a Texas reshaped by Harvey. Our conversation with the editor in chief of Texas monthly. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 8, 2017

As Irma bears down on a Harvey hit US, our neighbors to the south prepare for their own dual front disaster, we’ll explore. Also, it’s been more than 2 years since the waco biker shootout, and so far not a single conviction. How much did police know about the likelihood of violence that day, and why didn’t they intervene? Documents obtained by the Texas Standard shed new light on those questions, and we’ll talk with our investigative reporter. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 18, 2016

According to some in Sacramento, the election outcome is an existential threat. Has California become the new Texas? Plus Texas has legalized the medical use of cannabis oil, but the fees for doing business may make it impossible. A co author of the bill wonders if that wasn’t part of the plan, we’ll hear from her. Also, a prominent public figure delivers a concession speech: only this one’s not politics, it’s football. We’ll hear what the fuss is about, and why it matters in a larger sense. Plus a Texas history textbook from the 1950’s rediscovered, and reviewed. And the week in politics and much more coming up today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 23, 2016

Signals from space telegraph warnings for Texas about the source of those earthquakes we’ve been worried about. We’ll explore. Also when doctors can’t offer infants life saving technology because its too expensive: what then? A Doctor at Rice has been working on solutions, and she’s just been awarded a MacArthur genius grant for her efforts: we’ll meet her. And when in Rome, do as the Romans. When in college do you dare go with the Greek system? Hazing rituals back in the spotlight. Plus: it’s a beloved symbol in the Lone Star State, and yet its getting bulldozed out of Texas, almost literally. Can anyone save the Houston Toad? Those stories and lots more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 19, 2016

Emergency pay or a golden parachute? What was supposed to be a benefit faces new scrutiny amid allegations of abuse. Also You know that shaking going on around shale sites? New research suggests its been going on a whole lot longer than anyone realizes. That story plus small businesses going into overtime…what new rules mean for who gets time and a half. And living on the edge of prosperity…the foods may be whole-some…but not if you can’t afford it. A trek into a Texas food desert. Those stories and lots more today on the Texas Standard: