youth

Texas Standard: November 14, 2018

Fighting fire with…Texans. Crews from the Lone Star State travel west to help Californians battling historic blazes on several fronts. Also, some believe it could be both a watershed moment in the so-called drug war and a cultural moment – as the drug kingpin known as El Chapo heads to trial. Plus, are citizen militias really headed to the border to meet a migrant caravan? Politifact checks it out. And spoiler alert: it won’t be the Amarillo Jerky after all. The Panhandle city picks a name for its minor league ball club… and not everyone’s a fan. All that and more, today on the Texas Standard.

Texas Standard: September 19, 2018

You’ve heard of the Friday night lights? On this September 21st, the main event across Texas: the Friday night fight: Cruz versus O’Rourke. It’ll be live nationwide, will you be tuning in? R.G. Ratcliffe of Texas Monthly joins us with a cheater’s guide to tonight’s first of three debates between democratic congressman Beto O’Rourke and the GOP incumbent, Ted Cruz. Plus, you’ve heard about the wall? As arguments continue over funding, legal walls go up in the nation’s most diverse city: we’ll explain. Plus the week in Texas politics with the Texas Tribune and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 28, 2018

The end of Rowe versus Wade? Not so fast say a Texas law scholar and a former law clerk to retiring Justice Kennedy, we’ll explore. And conventional wisdom has it that Kennedy’s likely successor on the court will be an ideological opponent of the landmark 1973 abortion rights decision. But in the end, such a challenge might not turn on Kennedy’s successor, we’ll hear why. And first it was bags, but now that Texas bag bans have been trashed in a court challenge, the spotlight turns to plastic straws, we’ll take a look at the latest. Also, digital savant Omar Gallaga with summer tech for kids. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Higher Ed: Respecting Young Learners

Students and young scholars may not have had as much time in the classroom, but that doesn’t mean their work lacks insight, value and rigor. In this episode of KUT’s podcast Higher Ed, KUT’s Jennifer Stayton and Southwestern University President Dr. Ed Burger discuss the valuable contributions younger learners can make, and how society can better regard and embrace their thinking. Recent political and social movements have originated and flourished under the initiative and leadership of young people. Does society take the work and thinking of young people as seriously as it should? Ed and Jennifer discuss how society tends to treat young people, and what we may be missing by not paying more attention to their efforts. Ed argues that young people can actually bring a fresh and innovative approach to matters that should not be underestimated. Listen on for the full episode and to get the latest math teaser. It’s a “homemade” puzzler courtesy of Ed that will challenge thinkers of all ages.

This episode was recorded Feb. 28, 2018.

Texas Standard: March 9, 2018

For the first time in history a US president will meet with the leader of North Korea. Vindication of a strategy or something else? We’ll explore. Also, an accused pedophile has his conviction thrown out because a judge used electric shock to coerce testimony. What happens to the judge? Nothing, so far. So who’s policing the bench? And a new vision for computing as apple reaches out to visually impaired coders in Texas. Plus fangs for the memories: 60 years of the Sweetwater Rattlesnake Roundup.That and the week in politics from the Texas Tribune and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: December 11, 2017

Should Texas child protective services be forced to recruit more foster care families? A federal case nears a climax, we’ll have the latest. Also, a south Texas lawmaker calls for hearings on Russian meddling in Mexico’s elections? US Congressman Henry Cuellar tells us why he’s concerned, and why Texans should take note. Plus, net neutrality reconsidered: as the FCC approaches what could be a landmark vote, we’ll explore the practical implications of the proposed change. And retired teachers leaving a state health care system in droves, and agents stand down for an emotional family reunion at the border near el paso. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: December 8, 2017

A group committed to boosting prospects for democratic women calls on the resignations of two prominent state senate democrats. In a season of sexual harassment scandals, new allegations against state senators Boris Miles and Carlos Uresti are the talk of the Texas capitol city. Both men deny the charges. We’ll hear from the person who reported the story, as well as a fellow state senator calling for reform of how sexual harassment cases are handled. And a legal scholar who says the implications go directly to a larger cultural problem at the capitol. All of that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 23, 2017

The Manchester bomb attack sparks reaction across Texas; a former top national security adviser explores the implications. Also they’re calling it an emergency issue. With just a few days left in the legislative session, why are the governor, Lt. Governor, and the attorney General demanding lawmakers take up the issue of voter ID? Plus in a Texas city with one of the highest youth unemployment rates in the country, thousands line up for what’s billed as the largest youth job fair in Texas history. And is Lockhart still king of the cue? A major shakeup on Texas Monthly’s closely watched list of the best barbecue in Texas. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

12th & Chicon: Showing Kealing Students Their Potential

Kealing Middle School Principal Kenisha Coburn is focused on figuring out ways to get the school’s underrepresented students to realize their academic potential. The school is divided between a magnet program, which accepts students from across the district, and the academy program, which is made up of students from the neighborhood. One of the first things Coburn noticed was the racial division between the two programs.

12th & Chicon: The Millennium Youth Entertainment Complex

The murder of 16-year-old Tamika Ross in East Austin in 1992 started a journey for social justice that would take seven long years to complete. The history of the Millennium Youth Entertainment Complex may not be well known, but its impact is felt and appreciated throughout the community.

Texas Standard: September 23, 2016

Signals from space telegraph warnings for Texas about the source of those earthquakes we’ve been worried about. We’ll explore. Also when doctors can’t offer infants life saving technology because its too expensive: what then? A Doctor at Rice has been working on solutions, and she’s just been awarded a MacArthur genius grant for her efforts: we’ll meet her. And when in Rome, do as the Romans. When in college do you dare go with the Greek system? Hazing rituals back in the spotlight. Plus: it’s a beloved symbol in the Lone Star State, and yet its getting bulldozed out of Texas, almost literally. Can anyone save the Houston Toad? Those stories and lots more today on the Texas Standard:

Holidays: The Fountain of Youth?

For many of us, Thanksgiving means spending time with our families, carrying out traditions that we’ve practiced for years.

While it can be very stressful, messy, and challenging to spend time with family members you don’t see very often, it can also be a beautiful time of re-centering.

Traditions serve a psychological function. By repeating the same traditional activity with the same group of people over the years, we construct a chronological record of who we’ve been before – and who we are now. It’s a hidden way of staying in touch with the consistent elements of our identities, and it allows us to track ourselves as we develop and change.

Traditions give us an opportunity to become psychologically close to the person that we used to be in childhood, or adolescence – or even as recently as last year. And that’s something to be thankful for.

As always, Drs. Bob Duke and Art Markman are carving it up.