youth

Public school teachers in Texas are protesting vouchers. They’ve enlisted plumbers to help.

A federal judge strikes down a redistricting map in Galveston County, saying it violated the rights of Black and Latino voters, and gives the county until Oct. 20 to fix its maps.

Public school teachers plan to travel to Austin to fight a plan to use taxpayer money to pay for private tuition. Who’ll teach the students when the teachers are gone? You might be surprised.

As Texas’ population swells, so does empty office space. We’ll dig into what that signals.

And: We continue our month of Tracking Texas Cryptids with the spooky story of La Lechuza.

Community Resilience in Youth

September is Suicide Prevention Month, and over the last several years, data has emerged indicating an alarming increase in the suicide rates for Black youth. In the third episode of Mind of Texas, host Ike Evans navigates a hard conversation with Krystal Grimes, MS, LPC, Director of Inclusion & Resilience at Bastrop County Cares and Rue Dashnaw, a youth community leader to reveal how resilience has emerged within Bastrops bleak backdrop of selfharm and suicidal ideation.

 

After environmentally destructive launch, will regulators let SpaceX blast off again?

A new law barring transition care for transgender youth has been temporarily blocked by a Texas judge, but it may take effect anyway Sept. 1. We’ll have the latest – plus how doctors are trying to prepare.

Officials were left in disbelief over the scale and scope of environmental damage after the failed test of a SpaceX starship in South Texas earlier this year, according to a new report.

A new book sheds light on the seldom-told tale of conscientious objectors who nonetheless went to the front lines in Vietnam.

A man died working on the Tesla Gigafactory. The company didn’t tell officials.

A car crash in Brownsville: 8 dead, 10 injured. An accident or was it intentional?

One day before a vote to expel a Texas house representative, a resignation. Sergio Martínez-Beltrán of the Texas Newsroom on the state lawmaker accused of an inappropriate relationship with an intern.

Questions about the heat death of a worker helping to build Tesla’s Texas Gigafactory and whether reporting rules are being followed.

And a Texas based Go-Go, Head Over Heels about her new role with a stage production. Our conversation with Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Kathy Valentine.

Documentary highlights competitive high school mariachi

There’s a push in the Texas Senate to raise the penalty for illegal voting despite a widely reported absence of evidence that it’s a major problem. Sergio Martínez-Beltrán of the Texas Newsroom shares his weekly lookahead at what’s happening at the Legislature.

A bill filed last week would abolish the Texas Juvenile Justice Department and close down the state’s youth prisons.

There was chaos Sunday on the pedestrian bridge connecting El Paso with Juárez, Mexico. Lauren Villagran of the El Paso Times joins us to discuss what happened.

By many measures Texas is at the top of the pack for renewable energy, yet gas and oil likely remain big in the state for some time to come.

Plus we’ll hear from the directors and a student star of a new documentary that had its Texas debut at South by Southwest, “Going Varsity in Mariachi.”

Texas Standard: October 10, 2022

Protests by parents in Uvalde and a major shakeup in security for schools there. Uvalde suspends all activities for its school police unit with workers reassigned, placed on leave or resigning. DPS has been asked to help with school security. We’ll have the latest on continued fallout from the mass shooting at Robb Elementary in May. Also after dipping a bit, gas prices rising once more. Our go to energy expert on what behind pump prices and some of the larger ripple effects as well. And the Texas author calling for a healthier vision for boys and masculinity moreover. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 20, 2022

A Texas sheriff opens a criminal investigation into the flying of nearly 50 migrants from Texas to Martha’s Vineyard. Florida’s governor under investigation for emulating the tactic of Texas’ governor, flying migrants out of state. We’ll take a closer look. Also, many in the town of Uvalde turning to politics after frustration with how elected leaders have handled the aftermath of the mass shooting there last May. We’ll have the Texas newsroom with details. And President Biden pushing for online privacy legislation. Guess who’s pushing back: a hint, she’s not a Republican. Plus UT’s Steven Vladeck on Texas’ social media law, and what comes next. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 13, 2022

More details emerge about the horrific conditions faced by youths locked up in Texas’ juvenile justice facilities. Locked in a cell 22 hours per day with no place to use the restroom… That’s how some of the kids in Texas’ youth detention system spend their weekends, thanks to short staffing at the facilities. We’ll learn more about what’s being done to fix it. Plus an offensive by the Ukrainian military found Russian troops on the back foot. What’s it mean for the future of the war? Also on today’s show we’ll learn about two kinds of butterflies, health insurance for Texas musicians and the evolution of the copyright. All of that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 22, 2022

After the recent Supreme Court ruling proponents of abortion rights and same sex marriage protections are turning to Congress. But is there enough support? We’ll take a look. Also Texas teens across the board are dealing with increased mental health challenges since the start of the pandemic. But for trans teens finding the right mental health care support can be an extra hurdle. And first responders face high risk on the job. But when some Texas firefighters, officers and EMS workers have filed workers compensation claims they’ve found roadblock upon roadblock. Plus it’s not just home sale prices that are through the roof in Texas, it’s also rent. So can you negotiate with your landlord? And the study of Harry Styles. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 15, 2022

The state of Texas is suing the Biden administration over abortion guidance to hospitals. The federal rules instruct emergency room doctors to provide abortion services in emergency conditions. Texas’ own law provides exceptions for the health of the pregnant patient. So why is the state suing? Also, the state terminating its guardianship over scores of young runaways once in the care of child protective services. What happens to those young people? Other stories include the Austinite who many believe invented psychedelic rock. Plus the week in politics and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 13, 2022

White house flags ordered to half staff as the U.S. reaches what President Biden marks as a tragic milestone in the pandemic. As public health efforts against COVID-19 continue to scale back, deaths from COVID-19 in the US approach the 1 million mark, and Texas has the second highest number of those deaths among the 50 states. We’ll take a closer look. Also the Texas Supreme Court overturns the statewide injunction on investigations of parents providing gender affirming care to transgender youth. We’ll have the latest. Plus a Texan’s journey into the kitchens of Mexico becomes a rapturous revelation. And the effort to give an endangered Texas toad a fighting chance at survival. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 5, 2022

With the Supreme Court now widely expected to overturn Roe vs. Wade, new numbers of where Texans stand on the issue of Abortion. From abortion to border security, the state’s population growth and the economy, Texans weigh in on a range of issues that could have a profound effect at the polls come November. Jim Henson with the results of a new survey by the Texas Politics Project. Also, Texas’ attempt to treat gender-affirming care as “Child Abuse”. A new report examines the underlying scientific claims being made by officials leading the push. Plus, say cheese, Texas: why a place better known for its beef is challenging dominant states in the dairy business. All this and then some today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 26, 2021

A long awaited plan to vaccinate Texas kids as young as 5 against COVID-19. We’ll take a closer look at the rollout. Other stories we’re tracking: Texas civic leaders team up to try to get action from Congress on massive infrastructure spending. We’ll talk with the Mayor of Fort Worth. Also, why Texas juvenile lockups seem immune to reform. Plus a new high point for the commercialization of the final frontier? Plans for a massive new space station announced by a Texas-based pioneer in space tourism. And a kids TV classic returns all grown up, hosted by a native of the Rio Grande Valley. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 15, 2021

A likely appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court as the 5th Circuit reaffirms a decision to let Texas’ near total abortion ban remain in effect. Other stories we are tracking: in the final days of a third special session, the Texas House green lights a bill that would force transgender Texas youth to play on public school sports teams that align with their sex assigned at birth. Also, why supply chains have become a big worry for everyday Texans. And a horror film with a message steeped in the Mexican American experience. We’ll meet the star who hails from the Rio Grande Valley. Plus the week in politics and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 29, 2021

Lt. Governor Dan Patrick faces a new challenger from a former George W. Bush aide, running as a democrat. Matthew Dowd may be best known in recent years as a TV news analyst, but now he’s entering the race for Texas Lt. Governor. Though there’s still no democrat at the top of the ticket. We’ll have more. Also, Governor Greg Abbots policy of catching and jailing migrants at the border with Mexico dealt a blow by a state judge. We’ll hear why. And our own Jill Ament with the latest in a legislative move to restrict which sports teams transgender student athletes play on. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 16, 2020

Texas’ top law enforcement official Ken Paxton faces more legal hot water, this time from some of his own former top aides. We’ll have the latest. Also, a city’s convention center transformed into a field hospital as COVID-19 cases soar in El Paso. We’ll have more. And lessons for the lockdown era: a book to help kids cope with the Coronavirus. Also the twists and turns of Texas elections without straight ticket voting. And we’ll take a closer look at what drove so many young latinos and latinas to the polls. Plus the re-release of a mid-century classic offers a critical re-examination of Texas small town life. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Remembering The Summers Of My Youth

Now that we’re in the dog days of summer, I’ve been thinking about the long summers of my youth. We had longer summers then. It’s not just an idealized memory. Schools would dismiss us in late May and we wouldn’t return until September 2nd or so, generally the day following Labor Day.

What I remember distinctly about those summers of more than 50 years ago, is that I was a free range kid. My mom opened the gate in the morning for me and my brothers and we’d wander out into the great pastures of our neighborhood and entire town – yes, it was a small town – unsupervised. We’d roam all over with all the other kids, also free range, and play games and sometimes watch TV at other kids’ houses until we were chased out by a stern mom who’d tell us to “get- on-outside and play.”

I say we were unsupervised, but not really. The whole town had its arms around us and made sure we behaved, and were safe.

About noon we’d meander back home and have dinner. That is what we called lunch then. The noon meal was dinner. Then we’d have a nap, with cicadas humming loudly, and go back out until supper time, about seven. We’d eat supper quickly so we could get back out to our friends where we’d play until well after dark, enjoying games like “kick-the-can” and “red light.”

The grown-ups were out there with us, sitting in lawn chairs, making homemade ice cream, listening to baseball games on small transistor radios and gazing up into the stars, marveling at the tech-savvy age they lived in, where they could see NASA satellites passing over.

Yes, as kids, we were quite free. I remember one day me and my brothers were on our bikes with backpacks on, ready to head out and my father said, “Where are you boys going?”

We said, “To the lake.”

He said, “To that one five miles east of town?”

“Yes, sir,” we said.

“That one out there on the FM road with all the 18 wheeler traffic?”

“Yes, sir.”

“That one you have to cross the rattlesnake field to get to?”

“Yes, sir,” we admitted.

“All right. Just be back by dark or your momma will worry,” he said.

I like that my Dad would never admit to worrying himself. He just worried about my mom worrying.

He was also big on the idea that boyhood shaped and toughened the man that the boy would become.

Once I asked him for a ride over to my friend Gonzalo’s house.

He said, “It’s only a mile over there. Walk. It’ll do you good.”

I said, “But it’s about 100 degrees right now.”

He said, “Wear a hat.”

Summers sure are different for kids now. The world is no doubt more dangerous now than it was then.

But no matter the reasons I’m grateful for the boyhood I had, rather than these modern ones, with kids so often cooped up inside with high tech games. To be honest, though, I do have a tiny bit of cross-generational tech envy in me. I know that when I was 15 I would have loved to have had an Xbox. Still, I know for sure that I wouldn’t trade my free-range summers for all the terabytes of RAM in the world.

Texas Standard: June 17, 2019

Okay, now the legislative session is really over. The veto deadline has passed. What did and didn’t make it off Governor Greg Abbott’s desk? We’ll explore. Also, a dead zone is headed to the Gulf Coast. And it could be one of the biggest on record. How it happens and why it looks so bad. Plus, stuttering is common but you might be surprised how little is known about it. An effort to fix that and educate us all. Also access to healthcare can be difficult for all Texans living in rural parts of the state. So what if you have to go specifically to a VA hospital or clinic? all of those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 4, 2019

Texas has 44 billion dollars set aside for education: the biggest such endowment in the U.S. So why is the state spending less on schools? We’ll have the latest. Plus, in Texas’ biggest city, concerns growing over recent shootings involving children. Police are focusing on gangs, but heath workers want to look at something different. Also, millennials now more than a trillion dollars in debt thanks to college. How the price of higher ed is shaping up to be a factor in the forthcoming political season. Plus an iconic oasis in West Texas reopens, are you ready to take the plunge? All that and so much more today on the Texas Standard: