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Chronic wasting disease threatens deer and Texas’ hunting economy

With an impeachment trial looming, suspended Attorney General Ken Paxton is facing new scrutiny from the feds in San Antonio, with a federal grand jury convened to hear from witnesses close to him.

Emergency steps are being taken due to a disease threatening the state’s $4 billion deer hunting industry. The Standard’s Michael Marks has more.

In the final month of the hottest season in Texas, DJ Susan Castle weighs in on the question: What’s the ultimate Texas summer song?

Also, the week in politics with the Texas Tribune.

Could Texas connect to other electric grids?

A Texas redistricting challenge is being described as an important test of the Voting Rights Act.

Federal regulators are considering a rule that would force Texas to connect to other electric grids.

With Ken Paxton’s impeachment trial set to begin in the state Senate soon, attorneys for the suspended attorney general have asked for the case to be dismissed, citing the “prior-term doctrine.”

Understanding the new “right to farm” protections going into effect next month – and why they should matter to city dwellers, too.

Also, remembering Texas saxophonist Arnett Cobb.

Japanese snow monkeys thrive in South Texas scrub

Voters will ultimately get the final say on the new property tax cuts passed by the Texas Legislature. What’s in it for them, and what’s missing?

The investigation of a Texas A&M professor raises new questions about political pressure on campus coming from very high places.

U.S. military academies make way for a big change: allowing cadets to be parents.

Japanese snow monkeys were brought to Texas for research 50 years ago – and a journalist was driven to find out whatever happened to them.

Texas Standard: October 27, 2022

As a new poll points to a tightening race for Texas Governor, a focus on an issue considered one of the biggest. We’ll talk about how immigration and border security have been front and center in the contest between Republican incumbent governor Greg Abbott and democratic challenger Beto O’Rourke. Also with disinformation and misinformation rampant, the Standard’s Michael Marks on how to be a smart news consumer. And rising prices, rising wages. But not all paychecks rising at the same rate. Sean Saldana with more. And the southern second person plural that one writer now calls the most inclusive of all pronouns. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 14, 2022

The House January 6th panel wraps up evidentiary hearings. Did they move the needle for Texans prior to a big election? We’ll explore. Other stories we’re tracking: a big cost of living increase for social security recipients, the biggest in 4 decades. What does it mean for Texas and the long term future of the program? Also the organizer of the first Amazon workers union on the state of labor. And a look at a the complicated legacy of Cesar Chavez. A champion of labor, and a tough campaigner against illegal immigration. Plus the week in Texas politics and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 15, 2022

A major logistics catastrophe avoided. We’ll talk about the railroad worker strike that wasn’t. Railroad worker unions were prepared to go on strike without a contract that had better protections for sick time. We’ll have the latest on the deal that’s kept the trains on the tracks. Plus you’ve heard of blue books, the green book, but what about the beige book? It’s choc full of the economy’s secrets, and our own Sean Saldana’s been looking through a copy. And a major bridge project in Corpus Christi has produced major headaches. We’ll tell you why. That and the biggest headlines of the day, today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: December 20, 2021

Since 2010, more than 380 workers have died in the U.S. due to conditions at work. Deaths which experts say were preventable. The problem of heat-related deaths in the workplace is likely to intensify with climate change and workers of color are disproportionately affected. And what’s being done to curb these deaths? We’ll have the findings of a year long investigation by NPR, The Texas and California Newsrooms, Columbia Journalism Investigations and Public Health Watch, on a special edition of the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 24, 2021

Since 2010, more than 380 workers have died in the U.S. due to conditions at work. Deaths which experts say were preventable. The problem of heat-related deaths in the workplace is likely to intensify with climate change and workers of color are disproportionately affected. And what’s being done to curb these deaths? We’ll have the findings of a year long investigation by NPR, The Texas and California Newsrooms, Columbia Journalism Investigations and Public Health Watch:

Texas Standard: September 21, 2021

Hundreds more federal agents are sent to south Texas as the Biden administration steps up deportations of most Haitian migrants. After promises for sweeping changes in immigration policy, the Biden administration facing heat from immigration advocates and even some democrats over its handling of a humanitarian crisis at the border. We’ll hear more. Also the numbers are in, but how will the new political maps being drawn up by Texas lawmakers reflect the growing numbers of members of minority groups and people of color that have moved to Texas since the last census? And the unusual approach to saving the ocelot in south Texas. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 14, 2021

We’ll bring you the latest on tropical storm Nicholas. Also, a carefully crafted letter from Bell county officials to their community. We’ll listen to their heart-wrenching message. And sometimes it’s hard to understand what the FCC does, but this time it’s straightforward. It’s setting aside money for people who need better internet access. We’ll also learn about a boot camp. Not the kind where you drop down and give me 50, but a boot camp that gets soldiers ready for college. And Cricket, the sport, is investing big time in North Texas. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 13, 2021

Making good on a threat: Texas is suing over school mask mandates. We’ll take a look at what we know about a lawsuit against six Texas school districts. Also tropical storm Nicholas is headed towards the Texas Gulf Coast. We’ll discuss what the state and coastal cities are doing now and the implications as oil production is still offline from Hurricane Ida in Louisiana. And twenty years ago today… a disaster along the South Texas Coast. Remembering the Queen Isabella Causeway Collapse. Plus the Republican Party and Texas are practically synonymous in current politics but things have changed over the decades. A look back today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 9, 2021

The U.S. Supreme Court intervenes to stay a Texas execution over the role of spiritual advisors in the execution chamber. We’ll have details. Also, do laws restricting abortion access lead to cycles of poverty? A groundbreaking long term study says yes, amid a national conversation over Texas’ new abortion law. And Freedom calling? Or more like spam? The story behind a smartphone marketed to conservatives who want to make a break from big tech. And looking back 100 years after a Texas flood disaster that led to housing discrimination, environmental racism, and demands for change. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 8, 2021

The date’s been set: September 20th. And so has the agenda, if the Governor has his way. What’s in store for a third special session? We’ll have details. Also, new lawsuits take aim at Texas’ new election laws. And as the U.S. goes, so goes Mexico? Quite the contrary, as Mexico’s Supreme Court, in a dramatic step, decriminalizes abortion. A victory for an increasingly strong women’s rights movement there. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 7, 2021

The U.S. Justice Department pledging to explore ways to challenge Texas’ abortion law. But many questions as to how. We’ll take a closer look. Also, more than 57.000 Texans killed by COVID-19 so far. With new variants popping up, is this a pandemic or endemic? A Texas virus expert on whether and how the fight against COVID-19 should change. And engineering expertise and hard work. Once the recipe for success in the energy industry, now Texas energy companies say there’s a skills gap with more high tech hires needed for cleaner energy jobs. Also how new voting laws could backfire against the GOP. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 6, 2021

Texas 2nd special session of the year is over. And a new opinion poll suggests the result is not a necessarily good look for Governor Abbott. If critics were correct that the Governor’s legislative agenda was an effort to win over Texans prior to his reelection campaign, it hasn’t quite worked out as a net positive for him, if a new opinion poll is correct. What’s behind Governor Abbott’s highest ever disapproval numbers? Also, the Pentagon says a Texan was among the last U.S. service members to die in Afghanistan We’ll hear from the widow of another soldier killed in the attack on Kabul airport. Plus a call for a rethink of the American military and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 27, 2021

It was the story of the summer in Texas Politics. Now proposals at the center of a legislative walkout appear set to become law. The Texas House, where a quorum was broken over Democratic opposition to a voting bill, has just passed its version of that voting bill. Was the walkout all for nought? We’ll hear more. Also at a healthcare hub in west Texas, ER wait-times climb to 20 hours. We’ll have the latest as we continue to track the spread of the Delta COVID variant. And 100 miles in a hundred degrees. What would you call it? How the hotter than Hell bicycle race is rolling into its 40th year. Plus the week in politics and more when today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 22, 2021

50 years after they were declared unenforceable and illegal, could racial covenants finally be coming off property deeds in Texas? Coming up, Texas Senator Royce West on the push in the legislature to remove racial covenants from property conveyances and why this has become a priority. Also, Texas voices from the pandemic, the one from the previous century, that is. And the difficult task of calculating the loss to Texas due to COVID-19. Plus museums selling art to make ends meet. And the oil rally, already over? What it means for the industry and consumer prices at the pump. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 11, 2020

Under Governor’s orders, restrictions on businesses lift bit by bit. But can Texas really be a little bit open for business? Reporters from across the state on how and whether the incremental reopening is taking hold. Also floating storage facilities start crowding parts of the Gulf Coast offshore, we’ll hear why. And the first graduates of the new medical school in the RGV ender a brave new world. Plus something’s going missing in Texas. Namely the difference between certain vowels. The latest Texan Translation and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 11, 2019

The latest disturbance in the Gulf seems to be on track to hit Louisiana. But the next one could head this way. We’ll take a look at how Houston’s prepared since Harvey. Plus, a new school being built in the Texas Hill Country is billed as the most water efficient in the state. How it’s doing that and whether the model can be replicated. And strife in the tech industry. We’ll take a look at how planned Amazon protests are just one example of a potential shake-up. Also, we’ll look at teen curfews. Why some cities are reconsidering laws that punish minors for being out late or on a school day. All of that and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: February 15, 2019

Second shutdown apparently averted, but the focus remains on the border as the fight over a wall looks set to shift to a new venue, we’ll have the latest. Also, a property tax cut that could carry a high price tag for Texans. And honk your horn if you’re behind on your car payments…what a record number of auto loan delinquencies tells us about the health of our economy. Plus 10 oscar nods for the movie Roma: why the spotlight comes at a crucial moment for Mexico. Those stories and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard: