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A budding pipeline fight highlights activists’ changing tactics

What does the first day of Attorney General Ken Paxton’s historic impeachment trial tell us about what remains ahead? The Texas Newsroom’s Sergio Martínez-Beltrán joins us from the Capitol with a recap.

We’ll hear the latest on a new fight over a natural gas pipeline in West Texas – and how new strategies by opponents of such development are getting traction.

Among the new laws now in effect in Texas is a requirement for those who want to run for county sheriff.

The sister of Botham Jean, who was killed in Dallas five years ago, has written a new memoir, “After Botham: Healing from my Brother’s Murder by a Police Officer.”

Plus an update on wildfire dangers statewide.

Chronic wasting disease threatens deer and Texas’ hunting economy

With an impeachment trial looming, suspended Attorney General Ken Paxton is facing new scrutiny from the feds in San Antonio, with a federal grand jury convened to hear from witnesses close to him.

Emergency steps are being taken due to a disease threatening the state’s $4 billion deer hunting industry. The Standard’s Michael Marks has more.

In the final month of the hottest season in Texas, DJ Susan Castle weighs in on the question: What’s the ultimate Texas summer song?

Also, the week in politics with the Texas Tribune.

Examining the skills gap in a post-pandemic workforce

Border Patrol agents say Texas efforts to address migration are disrupting their work. Troopers say complaints are overblown.

We’ll have an update on the state’s wildfire risk as the dangerous pattern of hot and dry conditions continues.

How one Texas school district spent the the summer addressing safety concerns.

Reports of a concerning trend in the workforce: new employees that just aren’t ready to do the job.

There’s bipartisan support for rolling back some environmental regulations to speed up the production of U.S.-made semiconductors.

And we’ll hear from Kiana Fitzgerald, author of the new book “Ode to Hip-Hop: 50 Albums That Define 50 Years of Trailblazing Music.”

As Texas leads the nation in ‘family annihilation’ cases, what can be done?

Ken Paxton, the impeached attorney general, is headed for a Houston courtroom today on his 2015 securities fraud charges.

An update on wildfires across the state as firefighters brace for another tough day of heat and wind. We’ll hear where the fire threat is greatest and what to do to prepare.

Since 2020, Texas has emerged as the epicenter of “family annihilation” cases, in which someone kills at least two kinds of family members.

A new documentary traces the careers of two of Texas’ most famous musical siblings: Jimmie and Stevie Ray Vaughan.

And commentator WF Strong on what “Lonesome Dove “got right and wrong.

KUT Morning Newscast for May 18, 2023

Central Texas top stories for May 18, 2023. Raises for teachers in Austin and Georgetown. National bike to work day. Austin Police Department overtime.

All the Holidays All at Once

Tis the season for a trip to any retailer to make you feel very confused about the actual date on the calendar. Is it really time to buy egg nog already? What happened to that bag of Halloween candy I saw here last week? Are those — little Santas?? That inspired this Typewriter Rodeo poem.

Texas Standard: October 27, 2022

As a new poll points to a tightening race for Texas Governor, a focus on an issue considered one of the biggest. We’ll talk about how immigration and border security have been front and center in the contest between Republican incumbent governor Greg Abbott and democratic challenger Beto O’Rourke. Also with disinformation and misinformation rampant, the Standard’s Michael Marks on how to be a smart news consumer. And rising prices, rising wages. But not all paychecks rising at the same rate. Sean Saldana with more. And the southern second person plural that one writer now calls the most inclusive of all pronouns. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 9, 2022

Immigration enforcement is a federal function, but Texas authorities have been transporting migrants for months. Now, the ACLU wants the federal government to look into it. We’ll have the latest. Also the city of Houston recently collected more than 800 firearms as part of a gun buyback program. But will that make the city any safer? And are we in a recession? That depends who you ask. We’ll get you up to speed on the state’s economic outlook. All that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 27, 2022

The Governor’s race may be the marquee event but if Texas democrats are hoping for change, how’s it looking down ballot? Veteran political columnist Gromer Jeffers of the Dallas Morning News sizes up the slate for democrats as we fast approach the 100 day mark before midterms. Also a drop in childhood vaccinations in Texas and concerns as kids get ready to go back to school in the fall. Plus workforce numbers dropping across all demographics, except one. Why people of retirement age are going back to work and why it may be more than just a short term trend. Plus a Politifact check about medicare funding and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Out of Office Email Responder

It’s the time of year for time off. And, for anyone trying to get in touch with someone else, it’s the time of year for automatic replies. That was the inspiration for this Typewriter Rodeo poem.

Texas Standard: September 21, 2021

Hundreds more federal agents are sent to south Texas as the Biden administration steps up deportations of most Haitian migrants. After promises for sweeping changes in immigration policy, the Biden administration facing heat from immigration advocates and even some democrats over its handling of a humanitarian crisis at the border. We’ll hear more. Also the numbers are in, but how will the new political maps being drawn up by Texas lawmakers reflect the growing numbers of members of minority groups and people of color that have moved to Texas since the last census? And the unusual approach to saving the ocelot in south Texas. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 30, 2021

We’re going into another academic year that will be impacted by the pandemic. What we know now about how it’s affected student progress. Also, the DACA program can no longer accept new applicants based on a Texas judge’s ruling. So what’s that mean going forward? And the pandemic’s impact on employment has meant some gains for Americans with disabilities. What employers can learn. Also the pandemic’s partly responsible for Texas’ frenzied housing market. But will the bubble burst? We’ll ask an expert. We’ll also remember a dark day in Texas history, 55 years ago. And we’ll wrap up our Friday with the top news from this week in Texas politics. All of that today on the Texas Standard:

Work Meetings in the Time of Coronavirus

In a period of high unemployment and great risks with some in-person work, being able to connect remotely is a privilege. But it’s not always without its problems. That was the inspiration for this Typewriter Rodeo poem.

‘Working’ From Home

Many Texans are out of work right now. Others continue with what’s deemed essential business. And others still are trying to maintain duties that used to be done in an office — but is now being attempted at home. That third category was the inspiration for this Typewriter Rodeo poem.

More Meetings

You know the feeling. Your calendar is full of them when you get a notification about another. That was the inspiration for this Typewriter Rodeo poem.

Texas Standard: November 28, 2019

The Texas Legislature has recently taken up charges focused on mental health. Can those priorities maintain momentum into the next session? We’ll explore. Plus, mental health has been used in the same sentence a lot lately as mass violence. We’ll break down that connection. And as loved ones gather this holiday, one discussion point might be family history. Digging deep into what that means for one Texas family. Also, don’t ask don’t tell: it seems that’s still largely the policy when it comes to mental health at work. We’ll look at how to change that. All of those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Summer Living

The heat is still on for much of Texas. For those of us with indoor jobs or school, it can be surprising how warm it remains even late in the day. That was the inspiration for this Typewriter Rodeo poem.