Uninsured

The Rio Grande is getting saltier. What’s that mean for agriculture?

The U.S. Supreme Court will weigh in on SB4, the controversial Texas law that allows state and local police to arrest and prosecute migrants who enter the state, after delaying implementation of the law last week.
A lack of medical insurance and access to treatment is making life in rural Texas tougher than many might imagine.
Energy insider Matt Smith has the latest on rising gas prices as many Texans hit the road for Spring Break.
The Rio Grande, the body of water that outlines the border between Texas and Mexico, is becoming saltier – affecting people, farmland and livestock on both sides of the border.
And: Amid a statewide teacher shortage, one Central Texas school district is trying to turn things around by creating its own pipeline of new recruits.

As arctic front looms, how is the electric grid looking?

As Texas braces for a true blast of wintry weather, how much should we be worried about the power grid holding up? Mose Buchele of KUT in Austin is monitoring the power grid and joins us with the latest.

Federal funding cuts for special education could hit Texas hard.

Many Texans who are eligible for Medicaid aren’t signed up. Will Bostwick shares more on his reporting for Texas Monthly.

And: Remembering a musical British invasion of Texas more than a decade after the Beatles.

Texas Standard: August 25, 2020

Battening down the hatches in Beaumont and across large parts of coastal Texas as a hurricane named Laura intensifies in the gulf. Across the golden triangle evacuation orders take hold in advance of what meteorologists say could be a major hurricane threatening coastal Texas and Louisiana. We’ll check in with officials in Beaumont. Also, neither snow nor rain…but what about Congress? Texas lawmakers and the politics of the postal service in advance of election day. Plus the first and oldest hospital in the Americas. All that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 11, 2020

How ready is Texas when it comes to the spread of the coronavirus? We’ll talk with the state representative leading a hearing on that question. Also, when it comes to Coronavirus preparedness, how much does the high number of uninsured Texans complicate matters? We’ll explore. And voting delays in Texas last week last week. Was Hillary Clinton right in laying the blame where she did? We’ll have a Politifact Check. Plus the school district shutdown that at the last moment, didn’t happen. We’ll hear why, what happens next plus a lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 26, 2018

The Texas Attorney General is now getting involved in a court fight over whether Texas school children should be required to say the pledge of allegiance, we’ll explore the implications. Also, should toothless inmates in Texas be provided dentures? Right now, many are not. We’ll take a look at the policy some say needs to change. And something that may be in your garage or shed right now could be contributing to the decline in the bee population. We’ll take a look. Plus, speaking of bees, we’ll get the goods on honey. What is it exactly? We’ll hear from our insect expert. Plus, tracking especially high rates of asthma in Dallas. All that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 6, 2018

It was the biggest primary day so far. On the day after, what do the numbers tell Texas about the shape of the midterms to come? We’ll explore. Also, there’ve been lawsuits and noisy protests against school boards across the state as some districts move to replace failing schools with charter partnerships. What’s behind the controversies, and what do they tell us about how Texas is dealing with the issue? And, pain and profit. A year long investigation by the Dallas Morning News reveals how Texas had dropped the ball regulating health care for the state’s most vulnerable. And as the full moon approaches, the mystery of the Texas stonehenge, revealed? Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard: