Texas Monthly

What’s next for pro-Palestine campus protests in Texas?

An even larger antiwar protest at the University of Texas at Austin takes place Thursday, now the official response to protesters taking center stage. Is a major constitutional battle looming over UT’s response to Wednesday’s campus protests against the Israel-Hamas war?
Why tiny rural Texas towns may be in the crosshairs for a new kind of cyberwar between the U.S. and its adversaries.
Historic Texas barbecue joints, fading into history? Texas Monthly’s Daniel Vaughn with details.
Plus the week in politics with the Texas Tribune and much more.

Rio Grande Valley again draws attention ahead of 2024 elections

Is the boom in home prices in Austin, one of Texas’ hottest markets, over? And what might that mean for affordability?
Republican Gov. Greg Abbott, long a champion of free markets, is now calling for lawmakers to take action and curb large-scale home purchases from institutional investors.
Some national politics watchers are pondering whether this is the year a long-time stronghold for Texas Democrats – Rio Grande Valley – turns solidly red.
And when it comes to chili, ¡Viva Terlingua! But chili’s got a new challenger. Texas Monthly barbecue editor Daniel Vaughn samples what’s cookin.’

Children at Risk’s annual ranking of Texas schools is out

Texas officials say they’re reassigning workers to deal with an ongoing problem of providing care for foster kids without placement.

The 2022-2023 school ratings report from Houston-based nonprofit Children at Risk sheds light on progress and problems that districts are facing statewide.

Former Austin Police Chief Art Acevedo, who also had a short stint in Houston, will soon take on a new position overseeing Austin’s police department.

And a giraffe in a park in Juárez, who made headlines last year, is getting a new home.

What you need to know about viewing the upcoming solar eclipses from Texas

Though Attorney General Ken Paxton has been acquitted on all impeachment charges, whistleblowers say they’re not giving up. Sergio Martínez-Beltrán of the Texas Newsroom shares more.

It’s rare for an eclipse to be visible at the same location within several years, much less a few months – but the skies over a portion of Texas will be ground zero for observing both an annular and a total solar eclipse.

At the Rescue Mission of El Paso, plenty of food is coming in – but it’s not to feed people experiencing homelessness. Instead, those people are feeding others. Texas monthly barbecue editor Daniel Vaughn shares the mission of Hallelujah! BBQ.

Houston sues state over ‘Death Star’ law that will block local ordinances

Houston has sued the state to try and block the “Death Star” law that will block local regulations from being enacted at the city and county level.

Why several homes and businesses flooded during Hurricane Harvey may be passing up a last chance for compensation.

A new documentary, “Every Body,” turns the spotlight on people in the intersex community.

Plus, with digital streaming services upending the old model for making money in music, tech expert Omar Gallaga explores ways to support one’s favorite artists.

‘Lone Stars Rising’ profiles 50 Texans changing our world

The sheriff of Bexar County is pushing for charges to be brought over migrant flights to Martha’s Vineyard.

Where did high-profile bills dealing with higher education wind up this legislative session? Kate McGee of the Texas Tribune joins with an overview.

An investigation has revealed a culture of sexism and discrimination in the El Paso Police Department.

Is air travel getting bumpier, or does it just seem that way? A Texas A&M expert explains what’s known as clear air turbulence.

Texas Monthly editor Jeff Salamon discusses “Lone Stars Rising,” a look at 50 Texans who have made a lasting impact in the past 50 years.

And stop the presses: A one-day walkout at the Gannett-owned Austin American-Statesman turns the spotlight on journalists in Texas moving to unionize.

NASA’s new head scientist on the future of space exploration

Two lawsuits in Texas, one in Galveston and one in Amarillo, have potential impacts on a post-Roe v. Wade world. SMU legal scholar Seema Mohapatra on the implications for people seeking abortions in Texas and beyond.

U.S. Sen. John Cornyn says he plans to block a Biden administration proposal that would allow thousands of migrants to live in the U.S. while their asylum cases are being considered.

We talk to Dr. Nicola Fox, who has been named NASA’s new head of science – a dream gig that comes with a $7.8 billion budget and responsibility for more than 100 missions.

And a new book, “The People’s Hospital: Hope and Peril in American Medicine,” claims a hospital in Houston could serve as a model for improving health care access nationwide.

What is a ‘constitutional sheriff’?

Inauguration ceremonies at the capitol lift the curtain and set the stage as the 88th legislature gets underway in earnest. We’ll have more on the inauguration of the Governor and the Lt. Governor. Also a prison hunger strike and allegations of retaliation. And the constitutional sheriffs movement and why advocates of police reform are concerned a vow to uphold the law is being twisted into something that subverts the law. Also 50 years of BBQ. The barbecue editor of Texas monthly on what’s changed in those decades, and it might be a lot more than you think. Plus, commentator W.F. Strong in celebration of Texas grammar, a Politifact check and more today on the Texas Standard:

The fight to save a historic hotel along the Texas Gulf Coast

With the impending end of Title 42 restrictions there’s a growing humanitarian crisis at the border. The director of Homeland Security joins us as record a record number of migrants arrive on the border. We’ll hear from the director of a network of regional shelters. Other stories we’re tracking: how the military is trying to deal with a rise in suicide deaths among service members. Also: an effort to save an historic gulf coast landmark hotel from the wrecking ball. Plus a just-announced breakthrough in nuclear fusion and what it could mean for Texas. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 14, 2022

Seldom has mental health been a bigger part of the public conversation in TX, but how much of a priority for state lawmakers? We’ll take a closer look. Also after a record high number of more than 375,000 teachers in Texas last year, this year, 12% left the profession. We’ll have more on a crisis of retention and recruitment in teaching. And education in prison and the implications for the long term in Texas. Plus Cop27: what the climate summit means for the energy capitol of the world. And at the intersection of an ever evolving Texas culture and the kitchen: 100 recipes. We’ll meet the authors of the Big Texas Cookbook and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 31, 2022

On this final day to register to vote in the primary, a new survey offers a sneak peek on who’s ahead in what races and why. A pandemic, a statewide power outage, a walkout at the capitol over voting restrictions. In 2022, how much is set to change in Texas politics? A new poll by the University of Houston Hobby School suggests less than some might imagine. We’ll hear more. Also, in a decision celebrated by environmentalists, rights to drill for oil in the gulf wiped out by a federal judge. We’ll hear about what could be long term ripple effects. And a growing problem for Texas pitmasters: where’s the wood? Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard :

Texas Standard: August 30, 2021

A U.S. Supreme court decision ends eviction bans, sending renters and relief groups in Texas scrambling for answers. We’ll have the latest. Also, 650 new laws set to take effect in Texas this week, and one’s been getting a lot of national attention. It would effectively ban abortions after about 6 weeks, and deputize ordinary citizens to enforce the new rule. We’ll have more. Plus SpaceX, the Cybertruck… now Elon Musk wants to enter another market in Texas: the electricity market. What this might mean for consumers and for the electric marketplace, already taking tons of heat for its shortcomings. All of that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 21, 2020

A sweeping stay at home order in Hidalgo county to stop the spread of COVID-19. But Governor Abbott says there’s no enforcement mechanism. In the Rio Grande Valley, doctors say resources are so limited they’re at the point of making difficult treatment choices. We’ll talk to the health authority in Starr county. Also, a state prison inmate surrounded by fellow inmates testing positive for COVID-19 is approved for parole but dies before his release. As his daughter grieves, she’s also demanding changes to the system. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 16, 2020

Bexar County officials among others asking the Governor for authority to require face masks as the numbers of COVID-19 cases continue to rise, we’ll have details. Also, the impact in Texas from yesterday’s landmark decision protecting the rights of gay and transgender workers. We’ll hear from the head of the State house LGBTQ caucus. And almost three years after Harvey, the Houstonians caught in the middle of a fight over relief funds. And the push to rename Fort Hood for a Texas veteran and Medal of Honor recipient who fought with the United States, not against it. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: February 18, 2020

As Bloomberg surges in the polls, his Texas strategy draws national attention, as another billionaire bets on Texas as a turning point. Our conversation with Tom Steyer on how the former hedge fund manager is pitching himself as an outsider here in the Lone Star State. Also on this first day of early voting, long time democratic members of congress from Texas facing challenges from progressives, in a fight for the soul of the party. Plus religious tattoos: new research suggests they’re making a distinctive mark. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 21, 2020

More foster kids sleeping in state offices? Efforts to deal with a crisis in the states child welfare system still failing hundreds of young Texans. Also, concerns about a growing mental health crisis on the border. We’ll hear the latest. And disorder in the court? A special panel now asking whether judges in Texas should still run for election in partisan races, or if it’s better to follow the federal system of appointment. Plus real brisket, fake news? Texas Monthly’s barbecue editor on Texans with a beef about a unique branch of journalism. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: December 3, 2019

He ran for senate, then he ran for president. Neither worked out as he expected. Now Beto O’Rourke has a new plan. We’ll look at what that might mean for Texas. Also, a federal plan to open up Texas forests to fracking. And from Wall Street to Y’all Street? Why a city in Texas is being talked about as a potential new capital for high finance. Plus, you may have seen him on the posters at Subway sandwich shops. But who is Pitmaster Ramone? And is he real? All of that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 1, 2019

In one of the top fundraising states for Donald Trump, what does impeachment add to the political mix for Texas? We’ll take a look. Plus, NPR’s John Burnett previews his story of how one of the nation’s biggest pro-Trump regions, the Texas panhandle is dealing with its fastest growing demographic… immigrants. And the Texas Tribune joins us with a look at the week that was in Texas politics. Also, a taste of this weekends 10th annual BBQ fest. Texas monthly’s barbecue editor Daniel Vaughn stokes our appetite and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 18, 2019

The President promises millions to be deported starting next week as he gets set to launch his reelection campaign. The pledge comes amid record numbers of apprehensions at the border and as he prepares for his first big campaign rally of the 2020 election cycle. Empty politics, or the launch of a major new enforcement action? We’ll explore. Also- the best lawmakers in Texas, and the worst too. In the aftermath of the 86th Legislative session Texas Monthly issues its long awaited biennial rankings. Plus the rest of what’s what this Tuesday and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 2, 2019

Reading, writing, and a rush to judgement? Some Texas lawmakers seem somewhat unsettled by a school finance bill racing to the floor of the Senate, we’ll have details. Also, the white puts in a multi billion dollar request for emergency border funds. This time, it’s not about a wall but humanitarian relief. Some in congress are unconvinced. Also the future of ugly food, why your next pet might be virtual, and actor and filmmaker Edward James Olmos is in the studio. All of that and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard: