Texas Monthly

Texas Standard: July 21, 2020

A sweeping stay at home order in Hidalgo county to stop the spread of COVID-19. But Governor Abbott says there’s no enforcement mechanism. In the Rio Grande Valley, doctors say resources are so limited they’re at the point of making difficult treatment choices. We’ll talk to the health authority in Starr county. Also, a state prison inmate surrounded by fellow inmates testing positive for COVID-19 is approved for parole but dies before his release. As his daughter grieves, she’s also demanding changes to the system. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 16, 2020

Bexar County officials among others asking the Governor for authority to require face masks as the numbers of COVID-19 cases continue to rise, we’ll have details. Also, the impact in Texas from yesterday’s landmark decision protecting the rights of gay and transgender workers. We’ll hear from the head of the State house LGBTQ caucus. And almost three years after Harvey, the Houstonians caught in the middle of a fight over relief funds. And the push to rename Fort Hood for a Texas veteran and Medal of Honor recipient who fought with the United States, not against it. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: February 18, 2020

As Bloomberg surges in the polls, his Texas strategy draws national attention, as another billionaire bets on Texas as a turning point. Our conversation with Tom Steyer on how the former hedge fund manager is pitching himself as an outsider here in the Lone Star State. Also on this first day of early voting, long time democratic members of congress from Texas facing challenges from progressives, in a fight for the soul of the party. Plus religious tattoos: new research suggests they’re making a distinctive mark. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 21, 2020

More foster kids sleeping in state offices? Efforts to deal with a crisis in the states child welfare system still failing hundreds of young Texans. Also, concerns about a growing mental health crisis on the border. We’ll hear the latest. And disorder in the court? A special panel now asking whether judges in Texas should still run for election in partisan races, or if it’s better to follow the federal system of appointment. Plus real brisket, fake news? Texas Monthly’s barbecue editor on Texans with a beef about a unique branch of journalism. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: December 3, 2019

He ran for senate, then he ran for president. Neither worked out as he expected. Now Beto O’Rourke has a new plan. We’ll look at what that might mean for Texas. Also, a federal plan to open up Texas forests to fracking. And from Wall Street to Y’all Street? Why a city in Texas is being talked about as a potential new capital for high finance. Plus, you may have seen him on the posters at Subway sandwich shops. But who is Pitmaster Ramone? And is he real? All of that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 1, 2019

In one of the top fundraising states for Donald Trump, what does impeachment add to the political mix for Texas? We’ll take a look. Plus, NPR’s John Burnett previews his story of how one of the nation’s biggest pro-Trump regions, the Texas panhandle is dealing with its fastest growing demographic… immigrants. And the Texas Tribune joins us with a look at the week that was in Texas politics. Also, a taste of this weekends 10th annual BBQ fest. Texas monthly’s barbecue editor Daniel Vaughn stokes our appetite and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 18, 2019

The President promises millions to be deported starting next week as he gets set to launch his reelection campaign. The pledge comes amid record numbers of apprehensions at the border and as he prepares for his first big campaign rally of the 2020 election cycle. Empty politics, or the launch of a major new enforcement action? We’ll explore. Also- the best lawmakers in Texas, and the worst too. In the aftermath of the 86th Legislative session Texas Monthly issues its long awaited biennial rankings. Plus the rest of what’s what this Tuesday and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 2, 2019

Reading, writing, and a rush to judgement? Some Texas lawmakers seem somewhat unsettled by a school finance bill racing to the floor of the Senate, we’ll have details. Also, the white puts in a multi billion dollar request for emergency border funds. This time, it’s not about a wall but humanitarian relief. Some in congress are unconvinced. Also the future of ugly food, why your next pet might be virtual, and actor and filmmaker Edward James Olmos is in the studio. All of that and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: December 4, 2018

A Texas Representative is leaving the state house’s ultra-conservative group. We’ll take a look at what the move could say about the upcoming Texas legislative session. Plus, the Texas Attorney General is accusing San Antonio’s police chief of violating the so-called sanctuary cities law. What happens now? And a Texas-based non-profit has been making big money housing immigrant children. A new investigation explores. Plus we’ll introduce you to U.S. Representative-elect Veronica Escobar. Why she says El Paso is the new Ellis Island. And we’ll take a look at a list of 31 of the most powerful people in Texas. You might be surprised. All of that and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 29, 2018

An historic new era set to begin in Mexico on Saturday. What does Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador mean for Texas? We’ll explore. Also, it’s been more than a year after Hurricane Harvey. Whatever happened to those long promised fixes to the floodplain maps? We’ll take a look. And in the first Texas city to shift to 100 percent renewable energy, plans to redesign the neighborhoods of the future. Also, the big news this holiday season may not be buying the latest smartphone, but what we’re buying with those smartphones. Our go-to digital guru Omar Gallaga has got your number. All that and then some today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 1, 2018

Along a major bridge in south Texas, welders putting barriers in place. We’ll get a first hand look at steps being taken in an apparent effort to shut down the border. We’ll be talking with a reporter from the McAllen monitor about unprecedented work on a bridge spanning the Rio Grande and what it could mean in practical terms. Also, the FDA green lights what could be a life saving new flu drug even though the researcher behind it says it could have happened long ago. Why the wait? Think: money. And a deal by IBM turns the nation’s attention to Texas farms, and not the kind that grow crops either. All that and then some today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 24, 2017

The economic impact of Texas music amounts to $3.6 billion a year. But with global changes to the industry, is Texas music still hitting the mark? Though the Lone Star State may not have the publishing houses or the recording companies of the two coasts, the artist roster has long been tough to top. And: Though some claim to be able to sing you the story of Texas music by heart, a new manifesto claims the so-called experts don’t know the half of it. Today veteran journalists Andy Langer, Michael Hall and Katy Vine of Texas Monthly join us for a review of the state of the art and its future. Our special music edition of the Texas Standard.

Texas Standard: September 20, 2017

7.1 on the Richter Scale: a deadly earthquake in central Mexico on the anniversary of a historic temblor. We’ll take you to Mexico city this hour. Also, the military plane is designated for TX and it could be a shot in the arm for you know where, we’ll have the story. Plus Ken Paxton says president Obama tried to confer citizenship status on daca recipients: Politifact Texas looks into that claim. And they say that news is the first draft of history. Now comes an important second draft you might say, with an exploration of a Texas reshaped by Harvey. Our conversation with the editor in chief of Texas monthly. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 21, 2017

Who are the best and who are the worst legislators in the 2017 session? It’s the list that’s got Texans talking on this Wednesday, we’ll hear why. Also the new bill outlawing so-called sanctuary cities doesn’t take effect until the fall, which leaves cities and counties exactly where when it comes to who do detain and for how long? We’ll hear about some hard lessons being learned by detainees and those doing the detaining. Also, if more and more nanny’s are watching out for Texas kids, who’s watching over the nannies? Those stories and a lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 23, 2017

The Manchester bomb attack sparks reaction across Texas; a former top national security adviser explores the implications. Also they’re calling it an emergency issue. With just a few days left in the legislative session, why are the governor, Lt. Governor, and the attorney General demanding lawmakers take up the issue of voter ID? Plus in a Texas city with one of the highest youth unemployment rates in the country, thousands line up for what’s billed as the largest youth job fair in Texas history. And is Lockhart still king of the cue? A major shakeup on Texas Monthly’s closely watched list of the best barbecue in Texas. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: February 23, 2017

It used to be the wall, now a new nightmare for Mexico city: where to put thousands of deportees and refugees, we’ll explore. Plus not one, not two, but five new bills aimed at countering campus sexual assault including one that could lead to criminal sanctions against college professors and administrators. And cranes and construction projects crown the skylines of Texas cities. Why a white house order might make half-finished projects permanent fixtures. And help! I’ve fallen and I can get tech. How the digital age is coming to the aid of older Texans. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 1, 2016

Inaccurate signs, incorrect information. Reports of problems at the polls balloon as to concerns about the impact on voting, we’ll explore. Also: what would Dan do? Amid the campaign chaos, the longtime voice of the CBS evening news warns our focus should be shifting to what happens after election day. Plus more than just a hobby: the new owner of the Texas Monthly tells us change is on the horizon for an iconic brand. And we’ve heard a lot about payday lending and some churches have heard enough. Now some communities of faith are taking action. And what shape is Texas in? That of a swimming pool? Or maybe it’s the other way around? We take the plunge today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 17, 2016

He calls it a big beautiful wall, running along the 2 thousand mile length of the US southern border. But could it really be built? We’ll explore. Plus thanks President Obama, but no thanks: we’ll hear why a federal inmate in Texas is turning down a white house commutation of his sentence. Also, naming rights, and some say wrongs. As a public school in Houston accepts a multimillion dollar grant and a new name: that of the donor. And a 25 million dollar homecoming for Texas Monthly: what the sale of an iconic magazine says about the state of the industry , and the state of Texas itself. All those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 29, 2016

The Saudi’s cry uncle. And the markets predicting a big boost in oil prices. A green light for drilling in Texas again? We’ll explore. Plus teenagers turning hitmen? How border cartels are recruiting school kids. Also With Texans transfixed on the drama of election season, some say a quiet movement is picking up steam which could have a much more profound impact that the vote in November is there a constitutional convention in our future? And its 4 in the morning and you’ve gotta have barbecue. In all of Texas, there’s only one joint that serving up 24/7. We’ll smoke it out. All that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 25, 2015

Nearly a million Texans will not lose Obamacare subsidies. A dissenting Scalia renames it SCOTUScare. Much more just ahead on the Texas Standard. Also from the supreme court today, what’s being called a major victory for fair housing activists in a case from Texas. We’ll explain. Need a ride? There’s Uber and Lyft…Need some gasoline? A Texas entrepreneur has a plan…we’ll hear about it. With high meat prices, Briskets increasingly on the back burner. Barbecued clod anyone? Texas Monthly’s Barbecue editor joins us to stoke the flames… Plus—what do texans really think of Jade Helm? All that and more…