Texas A&M

KUT Afternoon Newscast for May 24, 2024

Central Texas top stories for May 24, 2024. Heat advisory. City workers feeling the heat. Capital Metro will close two downtown MetroRail stations next year until 2026. A lawsuit accuses Central Health of improperly using taxpayer money. Austin FC to play three matches in a week. The Texas Softball team opens their Super Regional Series tonight at McCombs Field against Texas A&M.

KUT Morning Newscast for May 24, 2024

Central Texas top stories for May 24, 2024. Heat wave arrives in time for the holiday weekend. A new lawsuit alleges the City of Austin violated state law when approving the redevelopment of the former Austin American-Statesman office site. Programs that help support people who are experiencing homelessness are still facing challenges in Austin. The Summer Meals Program is ramping up as the school year comes to an end. Texas and Texas A&M will compete for a spot in the Women’s College World Series. Austin airport officials are reminding travelers to plan ahead when flying out of Austin Bergstrom International Airport this Memorial Day weekend.

KUT Morning Newscast for November 13, 2023

Central Texas top stories for November 13, 2023. Ceasefire march. Vigil for Austin SWAT officer. Christopher Taylor jury deliberations. Downtown Salvation Army shelter. Texas Workforce Commission federal grant. Kyle firefighter classes. Cool season crops. Texas college football update.

How to catch a wave in Waco

The president of Texas A&M has resigned amid turmoil over the botched hiring of a journalism professor. We’ll have the latest.

Amid record heat, Texas prisoners struggle to cool down in facilities that lack air conditioning.

Harris County has sued the state over a new law that will eliminate its elections department – and, officials say, cause problems for voters.

Texas-raised filmmaker Taylor Sheridan is getting kudos for boosting the number of Native Americans on screen.

The Austin Outlaws, a women’s tackle football team, celebrate a historic season.

Some of the state’s best-known towns for surfing include Galveston, Corpus Christi, Port Aransas, South Padre Island and … Waco. Yes, Waco.

And taco expert Mando Rayo with top summer sipping tips.

Texas Standard: October 17, 2022

Is South Texas ground zero for a political shift in 2022? Republicans, Democrats and the Latino vote are in the spotlight. Politics watchers say three republican Texas women, Latinas themselves, stand to lead an historic shift in voting patterns. We’ll take a closer look at what’s behind that. Also, has Mark Zuckerberg’s company gone too Meta? As valuations of the company formerly known as Facebook continue to slide, a reality check on whether its Metaverse strategy is grounded in reality. And from far west Texas, a sweet sound 50 years in the making. And for a family, a dream come true.
Those stories and much more when today on the Texas Standard:

The Most Generous Texan Of Yore?

Most Texans probably know the Brackenridge name. But, depending on where you’re from, you might have a different landmark (and namesake) in mind. In Austin, there was the area’s first public hospital. In Edna, there’s a more than one thousand acre Brackenridge Recreation Complex. But as Commentator WF Strong notes, the Brackenridge who lent his name to a park in San Antonio, George Washington Brackenridge, may have given more to Texas — in financial terms — than anyone else.

Texas Standard: July 22, 2017

Known for taking a stand on abortion rights and a gubernatorial race that won her national attention, Wendy Davis gets back in the game. In an announcement early Monday, former state Senator Wendy Davis made it official, announcing a challenge to a republican congressman, we’ll have details. Also, where the Texas GOP might be the most vulnerable? The answer might surprise you. Plus a prominent Texas university opens its doors to people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 14, 2018

Fighting fire with…Texans. Crews from the Lone Star State travel west to help Californians battling historic blazes on several fronts. Also, some believe it could be both a watershed moment in the so-called drug war and a cultural moment – as the drug kingpin known as El Chapo heads to trial. Plus, are citizen militias really headed to the border to meet a migrant caravan? Politifact checks it out. And spoiler alert: it won’t be the Amarillo Jerky after all. The Panhandle city picks a name for its minor league ball club… and not everyone’s a fan. All that and more, today on the Texas Standard.

Texas Standard: August 31, 2018

Down to the wire: Canada racing to do what Mexico did: strike a deal with the U.S. and save NAFTA. If they can’t, what will it mean for Texas? We’ll take a look. Also, politics watchers nationwide are enthralled by the Senate race in Texas. One of the most serious challenges from the Democrats in decades and hispanics may hold the key. Question is: will they turn out to vote? But more than that, how will they vote? Republicans rethinking their strategy. Also, business is booming in construction across Texas, just one problem: where are the workers? Those stories and a whole lot more on todays Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 21, 2018

Hubbub in Hub City: after the chancellor of Texas Tech resigns, questions grow along the lines of “was he pushed” and why. We’ll talk “regent-gate”. Also, working and getting ripped off at the same time: after Harvey a wave of workers come forward saying their wages were stolen. We’ll hear what’s being done to help and what isn’t. And condition critical for rural hospitals in Texas closing or on the verge of doing so at an alarming rate. We’ll have details. Also trial in Dallas for a police officer charged in the shooting death of an african american teen: what the case might say about justice in similar incidents. And a lesson from a hurricane on how to save a species. All that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 16, 2017

The president weighs in on Charlottesville and the pundits weigh in on the president, but where are the voices of Texans? Just ahead, four Texans with 4 different experiences, sound off on the president’s stunning press conference. Has anything changed on the day after? Also a federal court says Texas must redraw two congressional districts, but the political implications could be felt statewide, we’ll explain. Those stories and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: February 17, 2016

The fallout continues over what’s being called a racist incident on the Texas A&M campus. A Texas Senator calling the college students involved: gang members. Also, private prisons in Texas now could be licensed as a type of child care facility. We’ll unpack the details. Plus does an uptick in sales at brick and mortar bookstores indicate a turnaround in the trend toward e-books? And we’ll introduce you to a Texas author whose profile is about to rise. And we’ll hear why East Texas is the only place he’s interested in calling home. That and more… on today’s Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: February 11, 2016

The Supreme Court sides with Ken Paxton- what does the ruling really mean efforts to get Texas to clean the air? We’ll explore. Also a journalist is killed in Mexico. The government suggests it’s her own fault. The blame game and the ongoing drug war. And the new American divide luxury cities—versus Texas…we’ll explain. Also how does the saying go? With friends like these who needs…Facebook? Our digital savant explores who his real friends are. And the lingering culture of Johnny football—what’s really going on at Texas A&M?
All that and more today on the Texas Standard: