Testing

Is high school football on the decline in Texas?

A conversation with state Sen. Roland Gutierrez, a self-described progressive Democrat who’s running to challenge Ted Cruz for his U.S. Senate seat.

Three years after the big freeze that plunged most of Texas into darkness, a new bill aims to connect the state to neighboring electric grids. Mose Buchele of KUT in Austin has more.

A big change for the Texas STAAR tests: student essays graded by computer. How does that work, and how fair is it?

And: Is football still king in Texas? A Washington Post analysis looks at the sport’s rise and fall across the country.

What’s changed for migrants on the border after Title 42’s end?

Students get grades, but so do Texas schools – and with a change in evaluations, administrators are concerned.

Critics say a state lawsuit against Planned Parenthood is an attempt to completely wipe out what was once a prime provider of abortion services in Texas.

How people experiencing homelessness are trying to cope with life-threatening temperatures.

The end of pandemic restrictions against migrants seeking asylum in the U.S. prompted a lot of speculation about how the situation at border would be affected. We’ll take a look at what’s actually changed on the ground.

Also, what put a once-sleepy town in the shadow of Dallas on the fast track to becoming one of Texas’ biggest cities.

What’s in San Antonio’s ‘justice charter’?

Yes and no signs proliferate in San Antonio over Prop A. What’s behind the city’s so-called justice charter?

In Kyle, a corrections officer indicted in the shooting death of a person awaiting trial, and a family’s struggle to find answers.

Taking the STAAR tests online. Should there still be a paper option?

A push for more transitional housing for Muslim’s recently released from incarceration.

The story of a world premiere in Dallas for one of the most downloaded poets in the U.S.

And the week in politics with the Texas Tribune.

Texas Standard: October 25, 2022

With voting in the midterms underway, we’ll take a close look at how political disinformation is playing out in Texas politics. A case study of disinformation in action as the Texas Newsroom hones in on how false claims are affecting the democratic process. Also a disappointing report card on the post-pandemic state of education for elementary and middle schoolers. What can be done to combat learning gaps. Plus a historic shakeup in the UK, and what it could mean for Texans. And a first of its kind effort to lift barriers separating the field of chemistry and students with blindness and low vision. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 16, 2022

Many high marks and persistent challenges as Texas schools start off a new academic year with report cards from the state. For the first time in three years, the Texas education agency issues report cards for Texas schools. We’ll hear details. Also, what health officials are telling school teachers and administrators as a virulent strain of COVID-19 takes hold and experts try to tackle the spread of Monkeypox as well. And who’s pushing to ban books at school? A months-long investigation by the Houston Chronicle comes up with answers. And state senator Roland Gutierrez on how the state could and should better support Uvalde. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 20, 2022

After a two year reprieve due to the pandemic, Texas school officials announce the return of STARR tests for ranking schools; we’ll look at the implications. Also, the latest on the baby formula shortage in Texas. And, dueling claims about the potential for power blackouts this summer. These stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 13, 2022

Harris County is once again at its highest COVID-19 threat level. We’re talking to County Judge Lina Hidalgo about why and what she wants the community to know. Also with high COVID-19 positivity rates across the state, many Texans are desperate for tests. How to make sure the at-home variety give you the most accurate results. Meanwhile, at a time when hospital systems are overwhelmed, one is facing a potential financial crisis that could shut it down. We’ll look at why. And we’ll introduce you to a folk rock duo that describes their sound as “Southern and Garfunkel.” All that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 10, 2022

As the Omicron variant continues to feed a spike in COVID-19 cases in Texas, the Supreme Court hears arguments against vaccine mandates. We’ll have more on how the high court might be moving on vaccine mandates for large businesses and many health care providers. Meanwhile, Texas restaurants asking the state for millions of dollars to help them make it through the pandemic. Also, another round in the legal battle against SB8, the recently passed abortion restrictions in Texas. We’ll have the latest. And Texas to be home to the nation’s new biotech triangle. A major development or mostly marketing? Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 25, 2021

One of the first moves of the Biden administration was ending the so-called remain in Mexico program. But the Supreme Court says the program must remain in place for now. We’ll hear more. Also, tens of thousands of Afghans set to arrive in the U.S. Many of them to be resettled in Texas. We’ll hear how the process works. And what’s behind the sudden rise of Regeneron? Why the Covid-fighting therapy is getting new attention. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 7, 2021

The standardized STAAR test is set to go fully online soon statewide. But a glitch in testing this week has many wondering are we ready, or not? We’ll look at details. Other stories we’re tracking: the growing controversy over so-called vaccine passports quickly becoming a new culture war flashpoint. Are mandated certifications of vaccinations ethical? A closer look at some of the underlying considerations. And home prices skyrocketing in Texas cities, but if you’re thinking you can escape this trend by moving to rural Texas…think again. Also, the best chess team in the world? Look no further than the Rio Grande Valley. All of those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 23, 2020

News of the first FDA-approved COVID-19 treatment comes at a time when cases in Texas are starting to spike. We’ll explore the details and what’s next. And: Did you get a chance to watch the presidential debate last night? What are your thoughts? We’ll have a recap. Also: A new documentary about the life of Horton Foote who won an Oscar for his screenplay adaptation of “To Kill a Mockingbird”. Plus: The week in Texas politics with our friends from The Texas Tribune and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 27, 2020

Hundreds of thousands of people in Texas and Louisiana without power as Hurricane Laura makes landfall overnight. Despite warnings of an unsurvivable storm surge and record setting sustained winds, many along the northern gulf coast of Texas breathing a sign of relief, despite power outages and reports of property damage. Our conversations with people managing emergency efforts in Orange and Jefferson counties. Also what’s next in the aftermath of the storm. All of that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 25, 2020

Battening down the hatches in Beaumont and across large parts of coastal Texas as a hurricane named Laura intensifies in the gulf. Across the golden triangle evacuation orders take hold in advance of what meteorologists say could be a major hurricane threatening coastal Texas and Louisiana. We’ll check in with officials in Beaumont. Also, neither snow nor rain…but what about Congress? Texas lawmakers and the politics of the postal service in advance of election day. Plus the first and oldest hospital in the Americas. All that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 4, 2020

New numbers on COVID-19 testing in Texas tell us what, exactly? An investigative report by the Houston Chronicle says many Coronavirus test results are not included in official counts trying to chart the spread of COVID-19. We’ll hear why not and what it means for efforts to stem the spread of the virus. Also, El Paso students reflect on the deadliest attack on Latinos in modern U.S. history, one year on. And newsman Dan Rather on a plan to improve education. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 6, 2020

As officials confirm the killing of a soldier missing for months from Fort Hood, demands for the military to do more about sexual harassment, we’ll have details. Also, health officials in Texas concerned that finding a vaccine for COVID-19 may not be the final obstacle to a return to normal. Now some are speaking out about misinformation on vaccines. And many Texans are getting tested for the Coronavirus, but not all are getting their results. A firsthand account and what it says about the coordination of efforts in Texas to curb the spread of the virus. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 29, 2020

As much of the Lone Star State reopens, many prisoners in Texas eligible for parole are remaining behind bars. Why the hold up? We’ll explore. The governor says officials are monitoring the state for possible flareups and outbreaks but that effort’s overlooking many parts of Texas, notably communities of color. We’ll have details. Also, Texas hospitals that received bailout cash are suing a growing number of poor or unemployed patients. And rethinking the mythology surrounding the Texas ranger, the week in politics and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 25, 2020

With the unofficial start of summer in Texas, a re-evaluation of what we’ve endured and what’s ahead. We’ll take a look at the state of the fight against COVID-19. Texas based vaccine expert Dr.Peter Hotez gets us up to speed on the impact of the relaxation of stay at home guidelines in Texas. Also, why many daycares, now authorized to reopen, may not make it despite economic recovery efforts. And an update on the Coronavirus story unfolding just south of the border, and a rediscovered history of women and the high court. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 14, 2020

How to make up for lost time: reopen school for a full year? Texas educators struggle with what to do in the fall and thereafter, we’ll have the latest. Plus, a new phase in the battle against the spread of the Coronavirus as businesses try to reopen. We’ll hear more on the state of testing in the state of Texas. And Dr. Fred Campbell of UT Health San Antonio takes up more of your COVID-19 questions. Also, who’s in charge, where? The back and forth over seemingly contradictory safety orders from state and local officials. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 22, 2020

50 years ago today, what many people mark as the start of the modern environmental movement. What is the state of the Earth today? During a time of global pandemic, a pause to reflect on the 50th anniversary of Earth Day. Also, testing for Coronavirus ramping up in the most populous counties, whats holding back similar gains elsewhere in Texas? Plus how COVID-19 is keeping em down, way down, on the dairy farm. And a Texas congressman’s claim about a German powder that kills Coronavirus: a Politifact check and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 21, 2020

A gradual reopening in Texas. The governor promises it’ll be science based, but some have questions because of relative low levels of testing. We’ll have the latest. Also, how low can you go? What about prices plummeting to negative territory? Understanding the implications of a historic crash in one of the states staple industries. And fears of an economic impact that could rival the great depression. In Texas, street scenes echoing images form the 1930’s as thousands of families wait in line for hours to get food handouts, testing the resources of food banks. Those stories and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard: