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Emmitt Smith’s latest move is fighting opioid overdoses

Texas governor Greg Abbott’s prediction a school voucher bill would pass now looks unlikely as the latest special session winds down.

Legendary running back and three-time Super Bowl champ Emmitt Smith teams up with NARCAN to reduce opioid deaths.

How Texans cross into neighboring New Mexico for abortions. We’ll have a special report.

A Texas town’s long-lost photos go on display. What residents hope to learn about their past.

And how a notorious monster has helped generations of parents get children to behave – especially at bedtime. Kristin Cabrera explains the Cucuy.

A budding pipeline fight highlights activists’ changing tactics

What does the first day of Attorney General Ken Paxton’s historic impeachment trial tell us about what remains ahead? The Texas Newsroom’s Sergio Martínez-Beltrán joins us from the Capitol with a recap.

We’ll hear the latest on a new fight over a natural gas pipeline in West Texas – and how new strategies by opponents of such development are getting traction.

Among the new laws now in effect in Texas is a requirement for those who want to run for county sheriff.

The sister of Botham Jean, who was killed in Dallas five years ago, has written a new memoir, “After Botham: Healing from my Brother’s Murder by a Police Officer.”

Plus an update on wildfire dangers statewide.

Why many Texas cotton farmers are planting less this year

After a disastrous season for cotton production, could Texas lose its crown as top producer? Three Texans on the front lines talk about why some fear 2023 could be a tipping point.

The head of the University of Texas System Board of Regents puts a pause on new diversity, equity and inclusion policies.

With student debt forgiveness plans on hold, what are the implications for those struggling most to get out from under it?

Also tech expert Omar Gallaga on the rising price of social media verification and whether it pays to buy into the changes.

What zoos are doing to stay safe

Funding for public education is set to take center stage at the Capitol. Sergio Martínez-Beltrán of the Texas Newsroom joins us with what to expect this week as the Senate finance committee takes up education funding.

Some Texas lawmakers say student mental health is a top priority this legislative session. We’ll take a closer look at what’s being proposed.

Nearly two years after a major winter storm that knocked out power statewide, the city of San Antonio is facing a federal lawsuit that says its emergency preparedness plan is in violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Plus: After a series of animal disappearances at the Dallas Zoo, how are zoos and aquariums rethinking security?

Texas Standard: October 18, 2022

Iranian made drones rain fire on Ukraines capitol of Kyiv, we’ll look at the significance and long term implications. Coming up a Texas A&M expert takes a closer look at Russia’s new round of drone attacks and the potential for further escalation in Ukraine. Also, Houston, we have a problem: a new report says several of the city’s suburbs are sinking. We’ll hear why and what can be done to stop it. And disinformation in Spanish speaking media sparks a demand from a coalition of Latino organizations is asking social media platforms to intervene. Plus seeking sterilization in a post Roe Texas. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 14, 2022

Texas’ border security mission has cost more than four billion dollars and counting. Where’s all that money coming from? Operation Lone Star put 10,000 Texas National Guard troops along the state’s border with Mexico. Today we’ll help you make sense of how the state’s paying for it. Also a looming railroad strike could mean pain for people in the checkout line and Democrats at the polls. What’s the Biden administration doing to keep the trains running on time? And do people with low incomes get audited more than others? We’ll see how that claim holds up under scrutiny from Politifact. All that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 29, 2022

A booster rollout: ready for launch? As a long awaited Omicron vaccine gets ready for release, are Texans ready for another round of shots? We’ll explore. Other stories we’re covering: families of victims of the Uvalde shooting gather at the capitol to tell their stories and demand action. And military rules on weight leading to eating disorders and some say the services are do too little to address that issue. Also, the business of college football changing as never before with some players getting paid de facto salaries at bigger schools and altering the calculus for recruitment. Those stories and much more coming up today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 26, 2022

A Texas gun restriction for 18 to 20 year olds ruled unconstitutional. This, just 3 months after a young gunman’s deadly attack on a school in Uvalde. A judge in Fort Worth rules that Texas can’t ban 18 to 20 year olds from carrying handguns. We’ll hear more about what’s behind the decision and what comes next. Also beyond debt forgiveness: what can be done to bring down the cost of higher ed in the first place? And amid a water shortage in the Valley, one community moving to reclaim water for the future. Also a teacher shortage today, a crisis for the future? Plus the week in politics with the Texas Tribune and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 25, 2022

Are billions in school debt owed by Texans about to be written off the books? We’ll look at what President Biden’s announcement adds up to for Texans. Other stories we’re tracking: buying out of flood prone property: what it could mean for a region ravaged by Hurricane Harvey 5 years ago. Also after this weeks rains in North Texas, how the struggle’s just beginning for some families. And as housing prices skyrocket across Texas and many parts of the nation, military allowances not keeping up. And is the University of Texas about to pass Harvard as the country’s wealthiest university?Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 23, 2022

The head of the Uvalde school police force put on administrative leave amid growing questions about law enforcement’s response. Investigative reporter Tony Plohetski with the latest on a back and forth over what actually happened in those long minutes before police stormed the school shooter in Uvalde. Also as Capitol Hill takes up a bipartisan gun safety bill, Texas Republicans lambasting the Republican Texas Senator at the center of talks. We’ll hear more. And what does it mean to be resilient? A Texas coach on why we get resilience wrong and what science suggests we should get better at. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 3, 2022

As the people of Uvalde continue to morn the loss of 19 school children and 2 teachers, new questions raised about the law enforcement response. There are new revelations about what happened during the school shooting in Uvalde indicate that 911 calls from kids inside were not relayed to the incident commander. This hour, we take a closer look at what happened, what didn’t and why. Also, how residents of Uvalde are talking about the mass shooting and about guns. Plus the census undercount in Texas, did it cost the Lone Star State a congressional seat? Also Medicaid and maternal health, the week in politics with the Texas Tribune and more today on The Standard:

Texas Standard: February 15, 2022

As early voters begin to cast primary ballots, Black Voters Matter activists draw attention to what they call a crisis of voter suppression. Also a snapshot of political sentiment as voters prepared to pick nominees for statewide offices. The results of a new UT-Texas Politics Project poll. And student journalists report firsthand on the effects of the pandemic on Young Americans. Plus a homecoming of sorts for one of Texas’ best known rock and roll exports. Our conversation with Spoon frontman Britt Daniel on his band’s new release. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Taking Roll

Schools are, once again, overwhelmed by the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. At this current stage, some districts have shut down for days at time, others are asking parents to serve as substitute teachers. All that was the inspiration for this Typewriter Rodeo poem.

Texas Standard: July 30, 2021

We’re going into another academic year that will be impacted by the pandemic. What we know now about how it’s affected student progress. Also, the DACA program can no longer accept new applicants based on a Texas judge’s ruling. So what’s that mean going forward? And the pandemic’s impact on employment has meant some gains for Americans with disabilities. What employers can learn. Also the pandemic’s partly responsible for Texas’ frenzied housing market. But will the bubble burst? We’ll ask an expert. We’ll also remember a dark day in Texas history, 55 years ago. And we’ll wrap up our Friday with the top news from this week in Texas politics. All of that today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 5, 2021

We know a special legislative session starts this week. What we don’t know is what’s on the agenda. This week we’ll talk to Republican and Democratic strategists about the special session. Up first- the Democrats. Also, one in every four COVID-19 infections are from the aggressive delta variant. We asked health experts for their recommendations. And Texas based Exxon-Mobil is in the hot seat after revelations from a secret recording, we’ll tell you more. And how the student athletes of today will be able to do what students athletes of the past could never do – profit from their name and likeness. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 24, 2021

The number of foster kids sleeping in state offices reaches an all time high. A long running crisis in the foster care system, now worse than ever? We’ll explore. Other stories we’re following: a surprise move in south Texas by a democratic congressman, one some see foreshadowing a national fight for control of the U.S. House. Abby Livingston of the Texas Tribune with details. And a Covid variant found in a dog and a cat in Texas. Why this news has researchers watching closely. Plus addressing racial inequity in vaccine distribution. And what an author and scholar describes as a Sports Revolution: How Texas Changed the Culture of American Athletics. All that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 6, 2020

A police shooting in a small north Texas town over the weekend now. A 22 year old police officer charged with the murder of Jonathan Price. We’ll have more. Also, another sort of Supreme Court battle, this one happening at the polls in Texas. We’ll explore. And it wasn’t so much the wind, but the rain–a researcher sounding the alarm over hurricanes that stall, a new normal? Plus the case of the missing students, during a pandemic. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Poem For A Rising Freshman

Students are headed back to school. For many, that’s in a virtual way. For almost all, it’s different than last fall. That was the inspiration for this Typewriter Rodeo poem.

Texas Standard: July 13, 2020

5 years after the death of Sandra Bland, how much has and hasn’t changed? A conversation with two top Texas lawmakers on the changes to criminal justice in Texas since the death of Sandra Bland and what more needs to be done. Also, how Texas colleges and universities are trying to address changes in student visa rules. And as organizers push for greater Latino representation at the polls, a parallel initiative to preserve the history of one of the groups that led the push. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard: