Shelter

We’re tracking Texas cryptids all October

From guns to religion, free speech and more, a very loaded docket awaits the Supreme Court as it begins a new term.

Why a race for Houston’s top financial officer is getting so much attention.

A plan to consolidate schools in San Antonio could leave behind almost 20 empty buildings – and the district needs to figure out what to do with them.

As the dollar strengthens, other currencies weaken. But there’s a notable outlier: We’ll look at why the Mexican peso seems to be doing so well.

Also, as the spookiest month of the year gets started, a look at why Texas is so full of mysterious creatures unconfirmed by science.

The City of Austin has a dilemma: What to do with 32 fighting roosters

At the Austin Animal Center, crowding is the normal order of things. People from all over the region bring stray cats and dogs to the city — even if they’re not supposed to — because of its “no kill” animal policy. But the center recently got an influx of a different kind, leaving staff and volunteers with a conundrum.

What to do with 32 fighting roosters.

The roosters came to the center from the Austin Police Department, which had seized them after a cockfighting bust. They’re currently being held in two parts of the building: some on display in kennels usually reserved for cats or dogs, and many more in the loading bay, each assigned its own crate.

Texas Standard: February 7, 2022

A Texas official takes on listener questions about new vote-by-mail rules. Also, the energy implications of last week’s winter storm and the lingering psychological impacts of the winter storm of 2021. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 1, 2019

In one of the top fundraising states for Donald Trump, what does impeachment add to the political mix for Texas? We’ll take a look. Plus, NPR’s John Burnett previews his story of how one of the nation’s biggest pro-Trump regions, the Texas panhandle is dealing with its fastest growing demographic… immigrants. And the Texas Tribune joins us with a look at the week that was in Texas politics. Also, a taste of this weekends 10th annual BBQ fest. Texas monthly’s barbecue editor Daniel Vaughn stokes our appetite and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 11, 2019

The latest disturbance in the Gulf seems to be on track to hit Louisiana. But the next one could head this way. We’ll take a look at how Houston’s prepared since Harvey. Plus, a new school being built in the Texas Hill Country is billed as the most water efficient in the state. How it’s doing that and whether the model can be replicated. And strife in the tech industry. We’ll take a look at how planned Amazon protests are just one example of a potential shake-up. Also, we’ll look at teen curfews. Why some cities are reconsidering laws that punish minors for being out late or on a school day. All of that and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 14, 2019

Leaders of both the Texas senate and the house promising to hike teacher salaries so more will stay in the classroom. But how much money is enough? Also, to weather the government shutdown, the state steps in to help people who rely on what used to be known as food stamps. But experts warn of a hidden hit for grocers. We’ll hear about it. Plus a prominent Texas politician pitches his hat into the 2020 presidential race. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 8, 2017

Comey over everything. Texans glued to their radios and TVs as the former FBI director appears before senate investigators. We’ll take a look at reaction and more. Also, in the style of William Travis, a Texas mayor makes not-so-tongue in cheek plea, a call for people of good will to come to the defense of his city. Is he serious? You bet. And it’s all because of a new state law. We’ll hear about it. Also Harris county opening the jailhouse doors for scores of inmates–by court order. The county files an emergency appeal to the supreme court. We’ll have the latest. Also, the shopping habits of millennials drive a revolution in retail. It’s not just where and what they’re buying…but what they aren’t. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 21, 2016

in Houston, 65 percent of the city is within a mile of a toxic emitter. The impact’s not just environmental, but economic, we’ll explore. Also something has to change long term after the Sandra Bland case, at least that’s what some Texas lawmakers are talking about this week…but how, and how much? Plus there are shelters across the state for survivors of domestic violence—now comes an expansion to fill what may not be an obvious gap…a gender gap. And a claim made right on this broadcast: that Texas has lost more law enforcement officers in the line of duty than any other state in the nation. Is that true? We’ll do the numbers. All that and so much more today on the Texas Standard: