Reform

The ‘forever chemicals’ used in fracking in Texas

Calls for justice in Ciudad Juárez after dozen of migrants die in a fire at a detention facility. New details emerge about what happened just across the border from El Paso on Monday night.

Texas school districts banned hundreds of books last year. Now, the Legislature is looking to create standards that could pull even more books off the shelves.

Research increasingly shows that “forever chemicals” are making their way into our environment – especially in Texas, where they’re used in oil and gas extraction.

Plus an update from commentator W.F. Strong and a climate referendum in El Paso.

Texas Standard: July 28, 2021

New CDC guidelines on masks in schools this fall. Now one of Texas’ biggest teachers groups is sounding an alarm. The Texas state teachers association calling on Governor Abbott to drop his order against mask mandates as school districts prepare for a return to the classrooms and the Delta COVID-19 variant drives up cases and hospitalizations statewide. We’ll have the latest. Also the relationship between vaccination rates, media literacy, and what can be done to improve both. And an auspicious anniversary for the state’s top law enforcement official. A Politifact check and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 26, 2021

What a difference a year makes! The George Floyd ACT Poised to pass unanimously in Texas has stalled. Today we’ll tour the Texas Legislature and report on the progress, or lack there of, legislators have made. From police reform bills to bail reform to permit-less carry and marijuana related bills, we’ll take a look at the implications. Plus, in Texas literature Pulitzer Prize winner Annette Gordon Reed tells us how she mixed personal stories with history. And jolting the electric vehicle market here comes Lightning – ford’s newest F-150. Plus feral cats and the kids who are feeding them. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 20, 2021

The Legislature has the power, but does it have the will? Where’s the long promised fix to prevent massive outages like the one last winter? What happened to a much anticipated overhaul aimed at preventing another deadly round of power failures. Also an update on prison and bail reform. And as cryptocurrencies crash, the transplanted Texan who seems to have unusual power in the markets. Plus the best community college in the nation? a hint: it’s in the Lone Star State. And an historian pushes back on a project aimed at teaching what are described as Texas values. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 12, 2021

To everything there is a season, it’s said. But you might be surprised by what season is already upon us. Ross Ramsey of the Texas Tribune on what else seems to be sprouting along with the bluebonnets, as Texas politicians nurture budding would be candidacies for 2022. Also, a vote of another sort in Alabama with potential implications for efforts to unionization pushes in Texas. And is there a doctor on the line? How the pandemic may prove a long term shot in the arm for telemedicine in Texas. And something fishy getting served up in San Antonio, thanks to a British expat. Those stories and more on todays Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 18, 2021

Bottlenecks creating a backup of detentions of young people crossing the border without documentation. We’ll have the latest on what’s needed as concerns grow over the detentions of young migrants. Also a wave of bills to restrict abortion rights in Texas taken up this week by the Texas legislature, abortion opponents seeing opportunity in recent changes to the supreme court. And a red hot real estate market in parts of Texas rivaling what we’ve seen in places like California. Demand up, supply down. Are more Texans getting priced out of homeownership for the long haul? Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 13, 2020

Texans get in line to cast their ballots in one of the most consequential election years in modern memory. Polling the polling places as our reporting partners statewide check in on day one of early in-person voting in Texas’ election 2020. Also, Texas restaurants brace for a new post COVID-19 normal. What’s on the menu won’t be the same as it was before the pandemic. And the debut of a new book and documentary: Driving While Black. And under the dome in Austin, a call for more women in leadership posts. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 19, 2019

Life threatening conditions in parts of Southeast Texas as a tropical depression named Imelda moves inland and takes its toll. Water rescues underway as the first named storm since Harvey hits the Houston region. We’ll have details. Also, accusations of rising crime rates feeding into a big city mayoral contest in Texas. And, new smartphones hit the streets. Our go to tech guy on whether to buy in. All those stories and then some today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 31, 2019

On the national stage in Detroit, a declaration that Texas is in play for the Democrats in 2020. We’ll have a Texas take on the democratic debate last night. Also, the president’s border wall gets real for Starr county. NPR’s John burnett tells us what he’s learned about nearly 100 miles of new fencing. Plus a Politifact check that crime at the border’s gone way down. And an historic agreement on bail reform in Texas’ biggest county. Those stories and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 29, 2019

If another Harvey sized storm hit the Texas coast, could the state’s economy weather the hit ? A warning to Texas officials about the need to do something to protect the Galveston bay before the next so called 500 year storm event, we’ll take a look. Also a plan to get teachers to transfer to low performing schools, how’s it going? Plus how is it that a small texas town of 400 people is bankrolling projects statewide? We’ll explore. And has Texas government debt really risen 40 percent in 5 years? Politifact checks the numbers and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 17, 2019

Even after evidence of Russian attempts to hack U.S. politics, campaigns for 2020 are turning down cybersecurity help. Is that a smart move? We’ll take a look. Also, a new immigration reform plan. Todd Gillman of the Dallas Morning News tells us why Democrats say its dead on arrival. Plus, skyrocketing insulin prices? For a Texas congressman this one’s personal. Joaquin Castro tells us what he’s planning to do about it. And U.S. military veterans, more and more of them denied U.S. citizenship. We’ll hear what’s happening. Plus the week in politics with the Texas Tribune and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: February 5, 2019

If a gun is sold to a mass shooter, can the gun store be held accountable? A lawsuit against a Texas based sports shop is in the spotlight, we’ll explore. Also innocent until proven guilty, but those with money often get to walk before trial: now a move to change the rules on cash-bail statewide. We’ll talk to the Texas senator behind the effort. And what’s behind increased political polarization? According to a Texas researcher, it’s the demise of the local newspaper. If she’s right, now what? All of that and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 18, 2019

A federal appeals court hands the state of Texas a major victory in its fight to defund planned parenthood, we’ll have details. Also, after spending millions fighting civil rights lawsuits over cash bail, Harris county does a dramatic about face, pledging to end a system critics say discriminates against the poor. And what’s in the water beneath our feet? If you live near a coal power plant in Texas, quite possibly very scary stuff. We’ll hear about hidden dangers in the h2o. All that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 30, 2018

The state department denying US passports to American citizens born near the border. The accusation: fraudulent birth certificates. We’ll talk to the Washington post reporter who found that the citizenship of hundreds, possibly thousands of hispanics with American birth certificates are being stripped of their passports, and their legal status in the US thrown into question. We’ll hear the how and why. Also, Harvey trapped hundreds of thousands of Texans when major freeways flooded across Houston. Now the effort to fix what’s causing clogged arteries during storms. And smart enough to set up a smart home? A new industry emerges to help. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 2, 2017

The Affirmative Action pendulum could swing yet again. What a new document suggests about plans inside the DOJ. It wasn’t long ago the Supreme Court sided with the University of Texas’ use of affirmative action. A new administration could bring back the debate. Plus, President Trump’s proposed Border Wall may be coming sooner than expected to Texas. And, Just when you thought fried food couldn’t get any crazier, Texas brings you: the tamale donut, and a crawfish lollipop. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 28, 2016

A switch in time saved nine remember? If Ted Cruz holds his ground, what might save a nine person Supreme Court today? Also, it may sound strange with record numbers voting early, but history tells us, Texas ranks near the bottom when it comes to voter turnout. Why? We’ll explore. And the big shakeup for the Border Patrol, NPR’s John Burnett previews an in depth report on a cultural shift for the federal government’s biggest law enforcement agency. Plus after Shamu, whither Sea World? Hint: more rollercoasters may not satisfy protesters. All that plus the week in politics and so much more, today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 30, 2016

Should the size of your wallet determine whether you stay in jail or get set free? The answer maybe a matter of life of death, we’ll explore. Plus on this Memorial day, the unemployment rate hovering at what’s considered to be a healthy 5 percent, unless you’re the spouse of someone in the military where the rate’s closer to 20 percent. We’ll do the numbers. Also, after Georgia O’Keefe came to Texas, she ordered some of her early destroyed. Now 60 years later, and against all odds, a rediscovery now on display in West Texas.. We’ll hear the backstory. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard: