radio

Ode to NPR!

Texas Standard’s Typewriter Rodeo operates by request — this poem came from a suggestion by a listener identified as @earthweaver, who asked for some verses celebrating NPR.

SpaceX satellite debris could fall from the sky and kill people, FAA report says

Where do we stand with education in the special legislative session? With Gov. Greg Abbott and the Texas House at a deadlock over school vouchers.


The Federal Aviation Administration estimates that by 2035, one person could be injured or killed by falling SpaceX Starlink debris every two years.


As the World Series gets underway tonight in Arlington; North Texans share what their hometown Texas Rangers mean to them — and why they’ve never lost faith.


Also: the week in politics with the Texas Tribune.

Remembering John Aielli

If you knew John personally, you knew he was an avid thrifter. Both his home and his desk at work were covered with secondhand art and knickknacks, as eclectic as his taste in music. John spent more than 50 years sharing stories and his thoughts through the music he played on his radio show Eklektikos. Inspired by that eclecticism, we present to you a collage of songs, sounds and remembrances of an Austin legend, from longtime colleagues, friends, Austin musicians, and listeners all over the world.

This is “Remembering John Aielli.”

Texas Standard: December 29, 2021

Peak air travel meets pandemic spike. With delays, cancellations and hassles for holiday flyers…but wait: there’s more. As bad as the holiday season’s been for air travelers, the turbulence could last a good while for the airline industry in Texas and beyond. We’ll hear more. Also, not so solitary confinement: inmates at one of Texas’ most notorious prisons rig their own radio station to find escape, with the blessings of the warden. Plus long before broadband, the isolated but ingenious rural Texans who found ways to hack the system and stay in touch. Commentator W.F. Strong with that story and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 27, 2021

The new congressional maps for Texas, not the final word on redistricting as they face a fresh legal challenge with considerable muscle. We’ll have the latest. Other stories we are tracking: the FDA green lights COVID-19 vaccinations for kids 5 to 11. Any questions? Lots of them. A Texas pediatrician and virus expert takes them on. Also investigators trying to tackle acts of anti-semitism in Austin and San Antonio. And an experimental approach to long term poverty alleviation in Fort Worth. Plus the magic of radio turned up a few notches: the psychics who once haunted the airwaves along the Texas border. Those stories and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 20, 2021

Increasing concerns among doctors and other frontline health workers in Texas as COVID-19 cases rise once again. In some places in Texas, the COVID-19 risk level has again returned to historic highs as the Covid Delta variant takes hold. We’ll talk with two Texas health experts about what the trends are signaling. Also the FDA’s approval of an Alzheimer’s drug, and why some doctors are refusing to prescribe the drug, and lawmakers are asking questions. And an historic liftoff in west Texas. Plus the end of an era for Texas’ oldest licensed radio station? Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: December 31, 2019

Immigration, elections, new laws, challenges to natural resources. What were the top stories in Texas during 2019? That’s our focus for this hour. On this New Years Eve, we’re refocusing the rear view mirror on the year that was. We’ll hear from Victoria DeFrancesco Soto of the LBJ School at UT-Austin, Brandon Rottinghaus of the University of Houston and Lauren McGaughy of the Dallas Morning News as we begin an exploration of the topics that shaped Texas over the past year.

Texas Standard: May 30, 2019

The latest front in the culture wars? A game of political chicken, sandwiches? We’ll look at the backstory behind the conservative cry to save Chick-fil-a. AT&T is one of the biggest and best known brands in the world, but it ain’t your parents Ma Bell anymore. How the Dallas based phone company is morphing into a digital media giant. And a wake up call to save older buildings across the Lone Star State. Plus how Texas got its name: there may be more to the story than you think. All of those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 23, 2018

On this Black Friday, how marketing created a legacy of pirates in the air over Texas, affecting music culture and politics way beyond. With shopping season officially underway, we often think of hyper-commercialism as a byproduct of Madison Avenue. But one could make the case that America’s hype machine got its start along the border of Texas and Mexico, a million watts of power leading to a revolution of outlaw broadcasters still making a mark today. They’re our focus this hour: the pirates of the airwaves. From coast to coast and line to line, it’s Texas Standard time.

A Radio Dream

The intimacy of the medium of radio was the inspiration for this Typewriter Rodeo poem.

Texas Standard: December 5, 2017

Lawmakers thought they’d fixed the voter ID question in Texas. Today, the state defends the new law in federal court, we’ll have the latest. Also, when hurricane Harvey made landfall, Rockport took it on the chin. As people talk about rebuilding in other parts of Texas, the question for Rockport is far more stark: can it survive? With its tax base disappearing, the mayor’s literally counting the days until coffers hit zero. Plus: four juvenile justice groups call for the state to close its youth lockups. The response from the top? You might be surprised. And a surprising study on racism south of the border. Those stories and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 13, 2017

After repeated demands by democrats, a Texas lawmaker unveils articles of impeachment against President Trump. Now what? We’ll have the latest. Also, an army task force returns to Texas from Puerto Rico. We’ll hear what they encountered, and why the need for help isn’t likely to end any time soon. Plus, once it was hailed as a super principal for helping save a troubled school now she’s on suspension. A controversy that’s stunned the Houston community. And after a long fight to win UNESCO recognition for the Alamo, the president announces plans to pull out of the UN’s cultural wing, we’ll have the implications. Plus the week in politics with the Texas tribune and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 29, 2017

New York, Chicago, parts of Florida known for large Puerto Rican communities. My, after Maria, it’s looking like destination Texas. We’ll have the story. Also, a conversation with the head of Texas Task Force One, one of the first rescue groups to arrive in Puerto Rico. Plus, that phone in your hand? Chances are, it’s also a radio. An emergency communication device even if a cell tower’s down. So why don’t all phone companies turn on the chip? Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 23, 2017

California bans official travel to Texas–over a law they say permits discrimination in adoption services. The impact and possible pushback today on the standard.

After cutting off Planned Parenthood, the state launched a healthy Texas women program. One year later, what’s the prognosis?

Also, an old phenomenon gets renewed attention: why do so many women in the workplace seem to get cut off mid-sentence? Why the issue’s bigger than just hurt feelings…

Our homestate addiction to Tex-Mex reconsidered. Fighting back against the grackles, plus the week in politics and much more…it’s the national news show of Texas on this Friday.